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When to Walk

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When to Walk Cover

ISBN13: 9781841959467
ISBN10: 1841959464
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

One part Melissa Bank and another part George Saunders, When to Walk is a laceratingly funny and deeply compassionate take on how one woman reinvents herself and learns that, no matter how late, there can always be a new beginning in life. When Ramble's husband calls her an "autistic vampire" and abruptly ends their marriage over lunch, she isn't quite sure what to do. She has no rent money, a looming deadline for work, and new neighbors who seem to have involved her in petty crime. Faced with the dissolution of a life she hadn't really wanted, Ramble takes stock of what she has left.

In Rebecca Gowers's sharp debut, Ramble begins to reconsider everything her screwy family and unreliable but loyal friends have taught her so far. She spends a week taking apart her life and deciding which parts she wants to keep. Called "a mercurial delight" by the New Statesman and "brilliant...unforgettable" by Scotland on Sunday, When to Walk is a disarmingly honest portrayal of a young woman coming into her own — lit with hope, rich in magnificent characters, and hilariously wise.

Review:

"British writer Gowers follows her nonfiction work on Victorian criminals, The Swamp of Death, with a fictive weeklong journey inside the head of Ramble, a London woman quietly going crazy. Handicapped, partially deaf Ramble provides first-person narration that careens from her thoughts on photocopying pound notes to her grandmother's childhood to 1840s Stamp Office clerks with barely a breath. When husband Con calls her an 'autistic vampire' and takes off with the petty criminal living downstairs, Ramble comes unglued, and the narrative goes along with her: 'Remedial wise, give HER! The short shrift treatment NOW! And in a few days hence you will be beholding to no one: a law unto yourself. Oh yes!' While several quirky characters — particularly Stella, Ramble's dementia-suffering grandmother, and Johnson Pike, her childhood friend — are well imagined, Ramble's voice isn't enough to hold the book together as she flies apart." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Clever, comical and unpredictable, When to Walk took me inside the mind of a woman half-way between stupor and crack-up, a mind in an odd equilibrium, half appalled and half wonderstruck by existence. I love the way the narrator thinks. She's clever, obtuse, pliant, stubborn, solemn, funny, easy-going, angry; a teasing creation." Tim Pears

Review:

"As darkly funny as Sylvia Plath and as eccentric as George Saunders. Gowers is a genius." Scarlett Thomas

Review:

"In spite of her frailties, Ramble is an engaging and entertaining narrator." Library Journal

Review:

"A sharp, literate roman à clef for readers who like their female empowerment free from sentimentality." Kirkus Reviews

About the Author

Rebecca Gowers was born in the West Country and brought up, south of the river, in London. She currently lives in Oxford. Her first book, The Swamp of Death, was shortlisted in 2004 for a CWA Non-Fiction Golden Dagger Award. When to Walk is her first novel and was longlisted for the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction 2007.

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

bgelean, March 4, 2008 (view all comments by bgelean)
I had a hard time concentrating on this book at the outset. The book covers 1 week (each day a chapter) in the life of Ramble (how aptly named she is!) Saturday left me very confused and seemed more erratic than necessary, but by Monday I was getting into how it flows. The first part of the book was definitely difficult, and left me mostly confused and wondering when it could possibly garner some cohesion. It took me fewer days to get through the rest of the book which was enjoyable, but the first part I really dragged through. Once a bond was made with a neighbor, Ramble began to become more real to me. Once you get into the convoluted mind of Ramble, you can begin to enjoy her non-adventures as a travel writer who never goes anywhere. She definitely has an interesting command of the English language and her research methods are quite fascinating. For the full week her mind narrates the book, but I for one felt that the end was rather predictable. The book in itself is an interesting scenario of how a mind can work, but do we ever really know who she is by the end? I would have to leave that to future readers. Nevertheless, it is a very different book, full of unorthodox ideas and fun as well. Worth the read, although I'm not sure who I would most recommend it to. Certainly to anyone who is more interested in the psyche, and how people react to various crises. I believe Ramble is stronger than she knows and her current predicament is somewhat of a blessing. An unusual book, well researched in an odd way.
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Don Alsafi, February 15, 2008 (view all comments by Don Alsafi)
When to Walk is a fantastic read, but you wouldn't know it from a back-cover blurb or review synopsis: We're told that Ramble's marriage suddenly ends over lunch, her husband calling her an "autistic vampire", how does she go on, blah blah blah. One is forced to (rightly) wonder: Surely this isn't compelling stuff? Is there really anything original left to say on this subject?

What's most surprising is what the blurbs DON'T say: namely, how extraordinarily FUNNY the book is! Ramble, deaf in one ear and with "a dysfunctional pelvis", has a mind that's both brilliant and bent; her attention to detail is almost panoptical, and her tendency towards digression, reflection, and bewildering interpretation is no less hysterical than it is astounding. Her internal dialogue can make the strangest sidesteps - as when the sudden appearance of someone surprises her, and she promptly recalls the earliest OED citation (c. 1513) of the word "wow".

This is the tenor of the novel's narration, and you'll either love it or hate it. The lunchtime pronouncement is a clear illustration, as it's NOT what the husband said, so much as her instant rewording: "He didn't put it like this, didn't use either of the words I'm about to use, but I found he was telling me that in the person of his wife, I have degraded into an autistic vampire." She's incredibly intelligent, possibly gifted, hopelessly internal in her workings, and one gets the sense of her being slightly surprised by most everything - if only for a second. At one point her husband complains that she spends too much time inside her own head, and we're annoyed to concede that he might have a point. (Not that this makes him any less of a bastard.)

The novel takes place over a single week - each of the seven chapters comprising a single day - and, given the kind of story it is, doesn't have the greatest amount of plot. This has seemingly frustrated some readers, but I had no quarrel with that fact; Ramble's character and voice are such a singular mixture of ridiculous and affecting, that my only complaint was that it ended at all: I gladly would have read many more weeks' worth of her strange and comical misadventures.

When to Walk is Rebecca Gowers' first novel, and it's an astonishing debut. I'll be anxiously awaiting her second.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781841959467
Author:
Gowers, Rebecca
Publisher:
Canongate Books
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Contemporary Women
Subject:
Authors
Subject:
Middle aged women
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20070931
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 10 oz

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Contemporary Women

When to Walk Used Trade Paper
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$3.50 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Canongate U.S. - English 9781841959467 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "British writer Gowers follows her nonfiction work on Victorian criminals, The Swamp of Death, with a fictive weeklong journey inside the head of Ramble, a London woman quietly going crazy. Handicapped, partially deaf Ramble provides first-person narration that careens from her thoughts on photocopying pound notes to her grandmother's childhood to 1840s Stamp Office clerks with barely a breath. When husband Con calls her an 'autistic vampire' and takes off with the petty criminal living downstairs, Ramble comes unglued, and the narrative goes along with her: 'Remedial wise, give HER! The short shrift treatment NOW! And in a few days hence you will be beholding to no one: a law unto yourself. Oh yes!' While several quirky characters — particularly Stella, Ramble's dementia-suffering grandmother, and Johnson Pike, her childhood friend — are well imagined, Ramble's voice isn't enough to hold the book together as she flies apart." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Clever, comical and unpredictable, When to Walk took me inside the mind of a woman half-way between stupor and crack-up, a mind in an odd equilibrium, half appalled and half wonderstruck by existence. I love the way the narrator thinks. She's clever, obtuse, pliant, stubborn, solemn, funny, easy-going, angry; a teasing creation."
"Review" by , "As darkly funny as Sylvia Plath and as eccentric as George Saunders. Gowers is a genius."
"Review" by , "In spite of her frailties, Ramble is an engaging and entertaining narrator."
"Review" by , "A sharp, literate roman à clef for readers who like their female empowerment free from sentimentality."
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