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Rhythm and Business: The Political Economy of Black Music

by

Rhythm and Business: The Political Economy of Black Music Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Who profits most from the spectacular success of black music? For generations, African-Americans have created and driven varied musical genres: gospel, blues, jazz, r&b, rock and roll, funk, hip hop, etc. Black musical creativity has, in fact, fueled the modern music industry. Yet, of the country's ten largest black businesses, not one is a record company.

Given that hip hop music alone has generated more than a billion dollars in sales, the absence of a major black record company is disturbing. (Even Motown is now a subsidiary of the Universal Music Group.) Nonetheless, little has been written about the relationship between African-Americans and the music industry. Here, for the first time, is a collection of voices and perspectives that provides a nuanced investigation into this sorry history of economic thievery.

In R&B, Public Enemy's Chuck D, author Norman Kelley, and other journalists and musicians combine forces to examine how black music has been developed, marketed, and distributed within the structure of American capitalism. The anthology dissects contemporary trends in the music industry, and explores how blacks have historically interacted with the business as artists, business-people, and as consumers. R&Balso considers how the changes and developments within the music business—from the frontier of digital technology to the consolidation of the giant music conglomerates—might affect the future roles of African-Americans in the industry.

"Want a scathing social and political satire? Look no further than Norman Kelley's second effort featuring 'bad girl' African-American PI and part-time intellectual Nina Halligan—it's a romp of a read..."

Publisher's Weekly (starred review) on The Big Mango

Norman Kelley lives in Brooklyn, and is the author of the Nina Halligan political mystery series, which includes The Big Mango (Akashic) and Black Heat (Amistad/HarperCollins).

Synopsis:

Norman Kelley joins Public Enemy's Chuck D. and others to dissect the history of black music.

Synopsis:

Cultural Writing. African American Studies. For generations, African-Americans have created and driven varied musical genres: gospel, blues, jazz, R&B, rock and roll, funk, hip hop, and others. Black musical creativity has, in fact, fueled the modern music industry. Given that hip hop music alone generates more than a billion dollars in annual sales, the absence of a major black record company is disturbing. Here, for the first time, is a collection of voices and perspectives that provides a nuanced investigation into this 'structure of stealing.' Editor Norman Kelley (author of THE BIG MANGO and BLACK HEAT, both available from SPD) joins forces with a crew of veteran journalists and principled musicians to examine how black music has been developed, marketed, and distributed within the structure of American capitalism.

Synopsis:

Who profits most from the spectacular success of black music? In "R&B, " Public Enemy's Chuck D, author Norman Kelley, and other journalists and musicians combine forces to examine how black music has been developed, marketed, and distributed within the structure of American capitalism.

About the Author

Norman Kelley has written for Newsday, the Village Voice, The Nation, and New York Press. He is the author of "The Head Negro in Charge Syndrome" (Nation Books 2004), and the Nina Halligan mystery series — Black Heat (HarperCollins), The Big Mango (Akashic), and A Phat Death (Akashic). He lives in Brooklyn.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781888451269
Editor:
Kelley, Norman
Publisher:
Akashic Books
Editor:
Kelley, Norman
Author:
Kelley, Norman
Location:
New York
Subject:
Ethnic
Subject:
Music
Subject:
Business Aspects
Subject:
Economic Conditions
Subject:
Sound recording industry
Subject:
Rhythm and blues music
Subject:
African Americans
Subject:
General Music
Subject:
Music-Folk and Ethnic
Subject:
African American Studies
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series Volume:
EDO-RC-01-8
Publication Date:
20020231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
250
Dimensions:
9.00 x 6.00 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Folk » Folk and Ethnic
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Soul and Motown
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Music Business and Songwriting
History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General

Rhythm and Business: The Political Economy of Black Music Used Hardcover
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$7.50 In Stock
Product details 250 pages Akashic Books - English 9781888451269 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Norman Kelley joins Public Enemy's Chuck D. and others to dissect the history of black music.
"Synopsis" by , Cultural Writing. African American Studies. For generations, African-Americans have created and driven varied musical genres: gospel, blues, jazz, R&B, rock and roll, funk, hip hop, and others. Black musical creativity has, in fact, fueled the modern music industry. Given that hip hop music alone generates more than a billion dollars in annual sales, the absence of a major black record company is disturbing. Here, for the first time, is a collection of voices and perspectives that provides a nuanced investigation into this 'structure of stealing.' Editor Norman Kelley (author of THE BIG MANGO and BLACK HEAT, both available from SPD) joins forces with a crew of veteran journalists and principled musicians to examine how black music has been developed, marketed, and distributed within the structure of American capitalism.
"Synopsis" by , Who profits most from the spectacular success of black music? In "R&B, " Public Enemy's Chuck D, author Norman Kelley, and other journalists and musicians combine forces to examine how black music has been developed, marketed, and distributed within the structure of American capitalism.
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