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Freeman

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Freeman Cover

ISBN13: 9781932841640
ISBN10: 1932841644
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Freeman, the new novel by Leonard Pitts, Jr., takes place in the first few months following the Confederate surrender and the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Upon learning of Lee's surrender, Sam--a runaway slave who once worked for the Union Army--decides to leave his safe haven in Philadelphia and set out on foot to return to the war-torn South. What compels him on this almost-suicidal course is the desire to find his wife, the mother of his only child, whom he and their son left behind 15 years earlier on the Mississippi farm to which they all "belonged."

At the same time, Sam's wife, Tilda, is being forced to walk at gunpoint with her owner and two of his other slaves from the charred remains of his Mississippi farm into Arkansas, in search of an undefined place that would still respect his entitlements as slaveowner and Confederate officer.

The book's third main character, Prudence, is a fearless, headstrong white woman of means who leaves her Boston home for Buford, Mississippi, to start a school for the former bondsmen, and thus honor her fathers dying wish.

At bottom, Freeman is a love story--sweeping, generous, brutal, compassionate, patient--about the feelings people were determined to honor, despite the enormous constraints of the times. It is this aspect of the book that should ensure it a strong, vocal, core audience of African-American women, who will help propel its likely critical acclaim to a wider audience. At the same time, this book addresses several themes that are still hotly debated today, some 145 years after the official end of the Civil War. Like Cold Mountain, Freeman illuminates the times and places it describes from a fresh perspective, with stunning results. It has the potential to become a classic addition to the literature dealing with this period. Few other novels so powerfully capture the pathos and possibility of the era particularly as it reflects the ordeal of the black slaves grappling with the promise--and the terror--of their new status as free men and women.

Review:

"Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Pitts once again demonstrates his gift for historical fiction; having examined the African-American experience of the 20th century in 2009's Before I Forget, he turns his lens to the painful aftermath of the Civil War in his newest. The traumatic period is viewed from the perspectives of two very different, but equally inspirational protagonists. As soon as the end of the fighting has been announced, runaway slave Sam can only think of reuniting with his wife, Tilda, whom he has not seen in 15 years. Despite the difficulties of travelling from his current home of Philadelphia to Buford, Mississippi, and his uncertainty about how warmly she will welcome him, Sam perseveres. His encounters in the South, which jarringly assert that the end of the war does not equal an end to bigotry and hatred, parallel those of Prudence Kent. An affluent white woman from Boston, Kent is headed to Buford to establish a school for former slaves, an idealistic vision that rapidly earns the violent wrath of white Southerners. In lyrical prose, Pitts unflinchingly and movingly portrays the period's cruelties, and triumphs in capturing the spirit of the times through eminently-identifiable lead characters. (May)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

In the months following the Confederate surrender and the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, Sam--a runaway slave who once worked for the Union Army--sets out on foot to return to the war-torn South. He is compelled to find his wife, whom he and their son left behind 15 years earlier on the farm to which they all belonged.

At the same time, Sam's wife, Tilda, is forced to walk at gunpoint with her owner from the charred remains of the Mississippi farm into Arkansas. In search of a place that will still respect his entitlements as slave-owner and Confederate officer.

Meanwhile, Prudence, a headstrong white woman of means leaves her Boston home for Buford, Mississippi, to start a school for former bondsmen, and honor her father's dying wish.

Freeman is a love story, sweeping, generous, brutal and compassionate. Few novels so powerfully capture the pathos and possibility of black slaves grappling with the promise and terror of their new status as free men and women.

About the Author

Leonard Pitts, Jr. was born and raised in Southern California and now lives in suburban Washington, DC, with his wife and children. He is a columnist for the Miami Herald and won the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for commentary, in addition to many other awards. He is also the author of the novel Before I Forget (Agate Bolden, 2009); the collection Forward From this Moment: Selected Columns, 1994-2009, Daily Triumphs, Tragedies, and Curiosities (Agate Bolden, 2009); and Becoming Dad: Black Men and the Journey to Fatherhood (Agate Bolden, 2006).

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

bybookie, January 31, 2013 (view all comments by bybookie)
Though this is a work of fiction set in the immediate Post-Civil War period it has a universal message about love prevailing over hate and good prevailing over evil.
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Laura Swan, January 1, 2013 (view all comments by Laura Swan)
A soul-stirring read; the beautiful language in no way slowed down the plot. These are characters you want to spend time with; their story begins the day Abraham Lincoln was shot.
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Bill Houghton, August 13, 2012 (view all comments by Bill Houghton)
This is a thoughtful, emotional book on the lives of people, black and white, in the immediate aftermath of the Civil War. It's distinctly written from the black and abolitionist viewpoint, but that's just fine; that's what Leonard Pitts wanted to talk about. One of the cores around which the book is written is the search, by many of those who'd recently been slaves, for the families - wives, husbands, mothers, fathers, sons and daughters - who'd been sold away from them (or vice versa).

You won't regret reading this book; you may, as I did, find yourself weeping at the end, but also impressed by the resilience of the characters.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781932841640
Author:
Pitts, Leonard Jr
Publisher:
Agate Bolden
Author:
Pitts, Leonard
Subject:
General-General
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20120508
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Language:
English
Pages:
432
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » African American » Historical
History and Social Science » Politics » General

Freeman Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.95 In Stock
Product details 432 pages Agate Bolden - English 9781932841640 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Pitts once again demonstrates his gift for historical fiction; having examined the African-American experience of the 20th century in 2009's Before I Forget, he turns his lens to the painful aftermath of the Civil War in his newest. The traumatic period is viewed from the perspectives of two very different, but equally inspirational protagonists. As soon as the end of the fighting has been announced, runaway slave Sam can only think of reuniting with his wife, Tilda, whom he has not seen in 15 years. Despite the difficulties of travelling from his current home of Philadelphia to Buford, Mississippi, and his uncertainty about how warmly she will welcome him, Sam perseveres. His encounters in the South, which jarringly assert that the end of the war does not equal an end to bigotry and hatred, parallel those of Prudence Kent. An affluent white woman from Boston, Kent is headed to Buford to establish a school for former slaves, an idealistic vision that rapidly earns the violent wrath of white Southerners. In lyrical prose, Pitts unflinchingly and movingly portrays the period's cruelties, and triumphs in capturing the spirit of the times through eminently-identifiable lead characters. (May)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , In the months following the Confederate surrender and the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, Sam--a runaway slave who once worked for the Union Army--sets out on foot to return to the war-torn South. He is compelled to find his wife, whom he and their son left behind 15 years earlier on the farm to which they all belonged.

At the same time, Sam's wife, Tilda, is forced to walk at gunpoint with her owner from the charred remains of the Mississippi farm into Arkansas. In search of a place that will still respect his entitlements as slave-owner and Confederate officer.

Meanwhile, Prudence, a headstrong white woman of means leaves her Boston home for Buford, Mississippi, to start a school for former bondsmen, and honor her father's dying wish.

Freeman is a love story, sweeping, generous, brutal and compassionate. Few novels so powerfully capture the pathos and possibility of black slaves grappling with the promise and terror of their new status as free men and women.

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