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Stuffed and Starved: The Hidden Battle for the World Food System

by

Stuffed and Starved: The Hidden Battle for the World Food System Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"One of the most dazzling books I have read in a very long time. The product of a brilliant mind and a gift to a world hungering for justice." Naomi Klein, author of No Logoand The Shock Doctrine

Half the world is malnourished, the other half obese-both symptoms of the corporate food monopoly. To show how a few powerful distributors control the health of the entire world, Raj Patel conducts a global investigation, traveling from the "green deserts"of Brazil and protester-packed streets of South Korea to bankrupt Ugandan coffee farms and barren fields of India. What he uncovers is shocking — the real reasons for famine in Asia and Africa, an epidemic of farmer suicides, and the false choices and conveniences in supermarkets. Yet he also finds hope — in international resistance movements working to create a more democratic, sustainable, and joyful food system.

From seed to store to plate, Stuffed and Starvedexplains the steps to regain control of the global food economy, stop the exploitation of farmers and consumers, and rebalance global sustenance.

Review:

"Journalist and scholar Patel (Promised Land: Competing Visions of Agrarian Reform) focuses attention on the unfortunate irony of the current world food situation, in which the imbalance of world resources has created an epidemic of obesity in some parts of the world while millions in the 'Global South' endure starvation. To make sense of the situation, Patel addresses the entire system of global food production, distribution and sale, concluding that 'unless you're a corporate food executive, the food system isn't working for you.' 'Record levels of diet-related disease' plague consumers, cruel market realities (and unsympathetic officials) doom farmers, and communities are beset by a supermarket system that provides 'cheap calories' while 'bleeding local economies.' Patel analyzes what can be done, presenting logical recommendations and strategies for individuals-eat locally, seasonally, and ecologically; support local business, workers' rights, and living wages; create a sustainable food system-though several primary components of his big vision (including ending agribusiness subsidies and corporate farming, and levying a tax on processed foods) are clearly a long way off. Those concerned about global health, social justice and the environment will be aware of many of the issues presented here, but should still find much to learn." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

If you think the biggest food problems you are ever likely to face are safety issues like outbreaks of salmonella (spinach in 2006, tomatoes and jalapeno peppers this summer) and the high cost of organic produce, you're woefully naive.

Because, as Paul Roberts and Raj Patel will tell you, the food we eat is part of a global system, one made possible by international trade and transportation... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Book News Annotation:

Patel investigates why so many people are starving in the world while others have more than enough food. He describes how the global food system is shaped by farming communities, corporations, governments, consumers, activists, and movements, and looks at problems in a variety of countries such as farmer suicides and trade treaties. He also examines how the system evolved after World War II, how agribusiness corporations benefit, the importance of the soybean crop, and the power of the supermarket. He then addresses the impact of consumer tastes and how they can wield their influence. Patel (UC Berkeley Center for African Studies) is a policy analyst for Food First. Annotation ©2008 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

How can starving people also be obese?

Why does everything have soy in it?

How do petrochemicals and biofuels control the price of food?

It's a perverse fact of modern life: There are more starving people in the world than ever before (800 million) while there are also more people overweight (1 billion).

To find out how we got to this point and what we can do about it, Raj Patel launched a comprehensive investigation into the global food network. It took him from the colossal supermarkets of California to India's wrecked paddy-fields and Africa's bankrupt coffee farms, while along the way he ate genetically engineered soy beans and dodged flying objects in the protestor-packed streets of South Korea.

What he found was shocking, from the false choices given us by supermarkets to a global epidemic of farmer suicides, and real reasons for famine in Asia and Africa.

Yet he also found great cause for hope—in international resistance movements working to create a more democratic, sustainable and joyful food system. Going beyond ethical consumerism, Patel explains, from seed to store to plate, the steps to regain control of the global food economy, stop the exploitation of both farmers and consumers, and rebalance global sustenance.

About the Author

RAJ PATEL, former policy analyst for Food First, a leading food think tank, is a visiting scholar at the UC Berkeley Center for African Studies. He has written for the Los Angeles Times and The Financial Times, and though he has worked for the World Bank, WTO and the UN, he's also been tear-gassed on four continents protesting them.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Susan Jacobson, November 25, 2009 (view all comments by Susan Jacobson)
this is a wonderful book--clearly very well researched and well thought out. i like that the author does more than just present the scary, gloomy facts--he also offers practical solutions that every one can implement.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781933633497
Subtitle:
The Hidden Battle for the World Food System
Author:
Patel, Raj
Author:
Patel, Rajeev Charles
Publisher:
Melville House
Subject:
General Current Events
Subject:
Poverty
Subject:
Food supply
Subject:
Industries - General
Subject:
Industries - Agribusiness
Subject:
General Political Science
Subject:
Business - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20080401
Binding:
Undefined
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
8.00 x 5.50 in

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Related Subjects

» BLOCKED
» Business » General
» History and Social Science » Economics » Global Economics
» History and Social Science » Sociology » Poverty
» Home and Garden » Sustainable Living » Food
» Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Food and Famine

Stuffed and Starved: The Hidden Battle for the World Food System Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.95 In Stock
Product details 416 pages Melville House Publishing - English 9781933633497 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Journalist and scholar Patel (Promised Land: Competing Visions of Agrarian Reform) focuses attention on the unfortunate irony of the current world food situation, in which the imbalance of world resources has created an epidemic of obesity in some parts of the world while millions in the 'Global South' endure starvation. To make sense of the situation, Patel addresses the entire system of global food production, distribution and sale, concluding that 'unless you're a corporate food executive, the food system isn't working for you.' 'Record levels of diet-related disease' plague consumers, cruel market realities (and unsympathetic officials) doom farmers, and communities are beset by a supermarket system that provides 'cheap calories' while 'bleeding local economies.' Patel analyzes what can be done, presenting logical recommendations and strategies for individuals-eat locally, seasonally, and ecologically; support local business, workers' rights, and living wages; create a sustainable food system-though several primary components of his big vision (including ending agribusiness subsidies and corporate farming, and levying a tax on processed foods) are clearly a long way off. Those concerned about global health, social justice and the environment will be aware of many of the issues presented here, but should still find much to learn." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , How can starving people also be obese?

Why does everything have soy in it?

How do petrochemicals and biofuels control the price of food?

It's a perverse fact of modern life: There are more starving people in the world than ever before (800 million) while there are also more people overweight (1 billion).

To find out how we got to this point and what we can do about it, Raj Patel launched a comprehensive investigation into the global food network. It took him from the colossal supermarkets of California to India's wrecked paddy-fields and Africa's bankrupt coffee farms, while along the way he ate genetically engineered soy beans and dodged flying objects in the protestor-packed streets of South Korea.

What he found was shocking, from the false choices given us by supermarkets to a global epidemic of farmer suicides, and real reasons for famine in Asia and Africa.

Yet he also found great cause for hope—in international resistance movements working to create a more democratic, sustainable and joyful food system. Going beyond ethical consumerism, Patel explains, from seed to store to plate, the steps to regain control of the global food economy, stop the exploitation of both farmers and consumers, and rebalance global sustenance.

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