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Script and Scribble: The Rise and Fall of Handwriting

by

Script and Scribble: The Rise and Fall of Handwriting Cover

ISBN13: 9781933633671
ISBN10: 1933633670
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Review-A-Day

"Like many people over the age of 40, I still have a callused knobby excrescence on the third finger of my right hand, the place where pencils and ballpoints and fountain pens have been resting ever since I first began to learn the Palmer method of cursive handwriting. Kids no longer have this 'writer's bump,' since cursive isn't seriously taught any more. For the most part, young people born into the computer age can, by focusing hard, just about sign their names in longhand, but otherwise they rely almost entirely on printing or, more and more often, keyboarding. Today Truman Capote would have to quip: 'That's not writing, that's word processing.'" Michael Dirda, The Washington Post Book World (read the entire Washington Post Book World review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"Florey writes with verve." —Slate.com

"Florey . . . rattles off crackling prose in a no-nonsense voice." —The San Diego Union-Tribune

Steeped in the Palmer Method of handwriting she learned in Catholic school, Kitty Burns Florey is a self-confessed "penmanship nut" who loves the act of taking pen to paper. So when she discovered that schools today forego handwriting drills in favor of teaching something called keyboarding, it gave her pause: "There is a widespread belief that, in a digital world, forming letters on paper with a pen is pointless and obsolete," she says, "and anyone who thinks otherwise is right up there with folks who still have fallout shelters in their backyards."

Florey tackles the importance of writing by hand and its place in our increasingly electronic society in this fascinating exploration of the history of handwriting. Weaving together the evolution of writing implements and scripts, pen collecting societies, the golden age of American penmanship, the growth in popularity of handwriting analysis, and the pockets of aficionados who still prefer scribbling on paper to tapping on keys, she poses the question: Is writing by hand really no longer necessary in today's busy world?

Kitty Burns Florey is the author of Sister Bernadette's Barking Dog: The Quirky History and Lost Art of Diagramming Sentences. A veteran copy editor, she has also written nine novels and many short stories and essays. She lives in central Connecticut with her husband, Ron Savage.

Review:

Like many people over the age of 40, I still have a callused knobby excrescence on the third finger of my right hand, the place where pencils and ballpoints and fountain pens have been resting ever since I first began to learn the Palmer method of cursive handwriting. Kids no longer have this "writer's bump," since cursive isn't seriously taught any more. For the most part, young people born into the... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopsis:

Steeped in the Palmer Method of Handwriting she learned in Catholic school, Kitty Burns Florey is a self-confessed “penmanship nut” who loves the act of taking pen to paper. So when she discovered that schools today forego handwriting drills in favor of teaching something called keyboarding, it gave her pause: “There is a widespread belief that, in a digital world, forming letters on paper with a pen is pointless and obsolete,” she says, “and anyone who thinks otherwise is right up there with folks who still have fallout shelters in their backyards.”

Florey tackles the importance of writing by hand and its place in our increasingly electronic society in this fascinating exploration of the history of handwriting. Weaving together the evolution of writing implements and scripts, pen-collecting societies, the golden age of American penmanship, the growth in popularity of handwriting analysis, and the many aficionados who still prefer scribbling on paper to tapping on keys, she asks the question: Is writing by hand really no longer necessary in todays busy world?

About the Author

Kitty Burns Florey, a veteran copy editor, is the author of nine novels (Solos, Souvenir of Cold Springs) and many short stories and essays. With her husband, Ron Savage, she divides her time between central Connecticut and upstate New York.

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

monsterpants, March 5, 2009 (view all comments by monsterpants)
I just bought this book last week and cracked it open yesterday to really beginning reading it. I'm not all the way through, but here's what I have to say so far:

First of all, it's very cute- the design, layout, images, and footnotes are all very charming. I bought it because I'm crazy about handwriting, too, so naturally I like the content as well.

However, I'm really astonished at the poor editing. Footnote numbers are wrong throughout, not lining up notes with what that which they are referring to, and at one point in particular (page 31) one of the pictures even overlaps with text. What went wrong?? Who's to blame? How does a book get printed in this kind of condition?

Granted, I'm not the world's most "active reader"- I don't buy and read books as frequently as some. However I am intelligent and do have some standards as to what I expect when I pick up a book to read it. That said, I'm highly disappointed to see a book can make it through however many stages a book certainly must go through to be published, only to come out so mistake-laden.

Great concept, well-written, fun pictures, charming content- but overall poor editing leaves me pretty dissatisfied.
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(6 of 8 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9781933633671
Author:
Florey, Kitty Burns
Publisher:
Melville House Publishing
Subject:
Writing Skills
Subject:
Handwriting
Subject:
Penmanship
Subject:
History
Subject:
Graphology
Subject:
Grammar
Subject:
Art-Calligraphy
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20090131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
150 BandW PHOTOS and ILLUSTRATIONS
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
8.30x7.20x.90 in. 1.05 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Calligraphy
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General Medicine
History and Social Science » Linguistics » Specific Languages and Groups
Metaphysics » Graphology
Reference » Words Phrases and Language
Reference » Writing » General

Script and Scribble: The Rise and Fall of Handwriting Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 208 pages Melville House Publishing - English 9781933633671 Reviews:
"Review A Day" by , "Like many people over the age of 40, I still have a callused knobby excrescence on the third finger of my right hand, the place where pencils and ballpoints and fountain pens have been resting ever since I first began to learn the Palmer method of cursive handwriting. Kids no longer have this 'writer's bump,' since cursive isn't seriously taught any more. For the most part, young people born into the computer age can, by focusing hard, just about sign their names in longhand, but otherwise they rely almost entirely on printing or, more and more often, keyboarding. Today Truman Capote would have to quip: 'That's not writing, that's word processing.'" (read the entire Washington Post Book World review)
"Synopsis" by , Steeped in the Palmer Method of Handwriting she learned in Catholic school, Kitty Burns Florey is a self-confessed “penmanship nut” who loves the act of taking pen to paper. So when she discovered that schools today forego handwriting drills in favor of teaching something called keyboarding, it gave her pause: “There is a widespread belief that, in a digital world, forming letters on paper with a pen is pointless and obsolete,” she says, “and anyone who thinks otherwise is right up there with folks who still have fallout shelters in their backyards.”

Florey tackles the importance of writing by hand and its place in our increasingly electronic society in this fascinating exploration of the history of handwriting. Weaving together the evolution of writing implements and scripts, pen-collecting societies, the golden age of American penmanship, the growth in popularity of handwriting analysis, and the many aficionados who still prefer scribbling on paper to tapping on keys, she asks the question: Is writing by hand really no longer necessary in todays busy world?

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