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1 Burnside History of Science- General

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Galileo's Gout: Science in an Age of Endarkenment

by

Galileo's Gout: Science in an Age of Endarkenment Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:


Embryonic stem cell research. Evolution versus intelligent design. The transformation of medicine into “healthcare.” Climate change.

Never before has science been so intertwined with politics; never have we been more dependent on scientific solutions for the preservation of the species. As at home with Galileo and his daughter in Florence as he is with Diderot in Enlightenment France, William and Alice James in fin-de-siècle Boston, or the latest research on the genome, Gerald Weissmann distills the lessons of history to guide us through our troubled age. His message is clear: “Experimental science is our defense—perhaps our best defense—against humbug and the Endarkenment.”

Review:

"Weissmann, a research professor at NYU's School of Medicine, is concerned about what he calls the coming endarkenment, which he contrasts with the Enlightenment, and warns that our lack of scientific understanding is beginning to cause serious problems for society. For instance, he sees as emblematic of the endarkenment the displacement of science by religious doctrine in the evolution/creationism controversy and the federal government's efforts to do rigorous scientific studies of faith-based alternative medical treatments. As in other books, such as Darwin's Audubon and The Woods Hole Cantata, Weissmann offers brief chapters (most previously published in a variety of venues), which allows him to touch on many topics but at the expense of depth. Although Weissmann models his work after that of his mentor, Lewis Thomas, his writing is not as poetic; his ideas, however, are every bit as important. Two chapters, one on Thomas and one on Thomas's mentor, Hans Zinsser, are particularly well done and serve as an intellectual family history for Weissmann. Like those two greats, Weissmann is a staunch defender of experimental science and of medical practitioners who take the time to listen to and learn from their patients, all of which he fears will be lost in the approaching endarkenment. B&w illus." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Today's controversies in science and medicine, brilliantly illuminated in historic context.

Synopsis:

“Oliver Sacks, Richard Selzer, Lewis Thomas . . . Weissmann is in this noble tradition.”—Los Angeles Times

“Weissmann introduces us to a new way of thinking about the connections between art and medicine.”—The New York Times Book Review

Embryonic stem cell research. Evolution versus intelligent design. The transformation of medicine into “healthcare.” Climate change. Never before has science been so intertwined with politics; never have we been more dependent on scientific solutions for the preservation of the species. As at home with Galileo and his daughter in Florence as he is with Diderot in Enlightenment France, William and Alice James in fin-de-siècle Boston, or the latest research on the genome, Gerald Weissmann distills the lessons of history to guide us through our troubled age. His message is clear: “Experimental science is our defense—perhaps our best defense—against humbug and the Endarkenment.”

These reflections on the historical roots of the current culture wars in science and medicine again reveal Weissmann to be “by any standard, one of the major essayists of our time” (Eric Kandel, winner of the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 2000).

Gerald Weissmann, MD, is a research professor of medicine, editor in chief of The FASEB Journal, and director of the Biotechnology Study Center at New York University School of Medicine. His essays and reviews have appeared in numerous publications worldwide, including the London Review of Books and The New York Times Book Review. He is the author, most recently, of The Year of the Genome (2002). He lives in New York City and Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

About the Author

Gerald Weissmann, M.D., is a research professor of medicine, Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal, and Director of the Biotechnology Study Center at New York University School of Medicine. He is the author, most recently, of "Galileo's Gout: Science in an Age of Endarkenment." He lives in New York City and Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781934137000
Author:
Weissmann, Gerald
Publisher:
Bellevue Literary Press
Subject:
General
Subject:
General science
Subject:
Science
Subject:
History
Subject:
Discoveries in science
Subject:
Science -- History.
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Science Reference-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
April 2007
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
21 BandW photographs and illustrations
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
9.3 x 6.3 x 0.7 in 14 oz

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Essays
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » History of Medicine
Reference » Science Reference » General
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » General
Science and Mathematics » Popular Science » Essays

Galileo's Gout: Science in an Age of Endarkenment Used Hardcover
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$11.95 In Stock
Product details 192 pages Bellevue Literary Press - English 9781934137000 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Weissmann, a research professor at NYU's School of Medicine, is concerned about what he calls the coming endarkenment, which he contrasts with the Enlightenment, and warns that our lack of scientific understanding is beginning to cause serious problems for society. For instance, he sees as emblematic of the endarkenment the displacement of science by religious doctrine in the evolution/creationism controversy and the federal government's efforts to do rigorous scientific studies of faith-based alternative medical treatments. As in other books, such as Darwin's Audubon and The Woods Hole Cantata, Weissmann offers brief chapters (most previously published in a variety of venues), which allows him to touch on many topics but at the expense of depth. Although Weissmann models his work after that of his mentor, Lewis Thomas, his writing is not as poetic; his ideas, however, are every bit as important. Two chapters, one on Thomas and one on Thomas's mentor, Hans Zinsser, are particularly well done and serve as an intellectual family history for Weissmann. Like those two greats, Weissmann is a staunch defender of experimental science and of medical practitioners who take the time to listen to and learn from their patients, all of which he fears will be lost in the approaching endarkenment. B&w illus." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
Today's controversies in science and medicine, brilliantly illuminated in historic context.
"Synopsis" by ,

“Oliver Sacks, Richard Selzer, Lewis Thomas . . . Weissmann is in this noble tradition.”—Los Angeles Times

“Weissmann introduces us to a new way of thinking about the connections between art and medicine.”—The New York Times Book Review

Embryonic stem cell research. Evolution versus intelligent design. The transformation of medicine into “healthcare.” Climate change. Never before has science been so intertwined with politics; never have we been more dependent on scientific solutions for the preservation of the species. As at home with Galileo and his daughter in Florence as he is with Diderot in Enlightenment France, William and Alice James in fin-de-siècle Boston, or the latest research on the genome, Gerald Weissmann distills the lessons of history to guide us through our troubled age. His message is clear: “Experimental science is our defense—perhaps our best defense—against humbug and the Endarkenment.”

These reflections on the historical roots of the current culture wars in science and medicine again reveal Weissmann to be “by any standard, one of the major essayists of our time” (Eric Kandel, winner of the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 2000).

Gerald Weissmann, MD, is a research professor of medicine, editor in chief of The FASEB Journal, and director of the Biotechnology Study Center at New York University School of Medicine. His essays and reviews have appeared in numerous publications worldwide, including the London Review of Books and The New York Times Book Review. He is the author, most recently, of The Year of the Genome (2002). He lives in New York City and Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

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