Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | August 21, 2014

Richard Bausch: IMG Why Literature Can Save Us



Our title is, of course, a problem. "Why Literature Can Save Us." And of course the problem is one of definition: what those words mean. What is... Continue »
  1. $18.87 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Before, During, After

    Richard Bausch 9780307266262

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$7.50
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside - Bldg. 2 Artificial Intelligence- Robotics

Loving the Machine: The Art and Science of Japanese Robots

by

Loving the Machine: The Art and Science of Japanese Robots Cover

ISBN13: 9784770030122
ISBN10: 4770030126
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: None
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $7.50!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:


Japan stands out for its long love affair with humanoid robots, a phenomenon that is creating what will likely be the worlds first mass robot culture. While U.S. companies have produced robot vacuum cleaners and war machines, Japan has created warm and fuzzy life-like robot therapy pets. While the U.S. makes movies like Robocop and The Terminator, Japan is responsible for the friendly Mighty Atom, Aibo and Asimo. While the U.S. sponsors robot-on-robot destruction contests, Japan's feature tasks that mimic nonviolent human activities. The Steven Spielberg film, AI, was a disaster at the world box office except in Japan, where it was a huge hit. Why is this? What can account for Japan's unique relationship with robots as potential colleagues in life, rather than as potential adversaries?

Loving the Machine attempts to answer this fundamental query by looking at Japan's historical connections with robots, its present fascination and leading technologies, and what the future holds. Through in-depth interviews with scientists, researchers, historians, artists, writers and others involved with or influenced by robots today, author Timothy N. Hornyak looks at robots in Japan from the perspectives of culture, psychology and history, as well as technology; and brings understanding to an endlessly evolving subject. From the Edo-period humanoid automatons, through popular animation icons and into the high tech labs of todays researchers into robotic action and intelligence, the author traces a fascinating trail of passion and development.

Book News Annotation:

This study of Japan's love of robots will convince any reader to abandon all fear and dance into the future on mechanical arms. Although in the West robots are seen as threatening "terminators," in Japan, robots are more commonly seen as partners. Hornyak's examination of the reasons behind Japan's affection for robots begins in the 1600s, when craftsmen formed automated dolls that served tea, and traces the trajectory of that interest to industrial trade fairs and assembly lines, where robots are playing a major role in Japan's economic success. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Japan stands out for its long love affair with humanoid robots, a phenomenon that is creating what will likely be the world's first mass robot culture. While U.S. companies have produced robot vacuum cleaners and war machines, Japan has created warm and fuzzy life-like robot therapy pets. While the U.S. makes movies like "Robocop" and "The Terminator," Japan is responsible for the friendly Mighty Atom, Aibo and Asimo. While the U.S. sponsors robot-on-robot destruction contests, Japan's feature tasks that mimic nonviolent human activities. The Steven Spielberg film, "AI," was a disaster at the world box office-except in Japan, where it was a huge hit. Why is this? What can account for Japan's unique relationship with robots as potential colleagues in life, rather than as potential adversaries? Loving the Machine attempts to answer this fundamental query by looking at Japan's historical connections with robots, its present fascination and leading technologies, and what the future holds. Through in-depth interviews with scientists, researchers, historians, artists, writers and others involved with or influenced by robots today, author Timothy N. Hornyak looks at robots in Japan from the perspectives of culture, psychology and history, as well as technology; and brings understanding to an endlessly evolving subject. From the Edo-period humanoid automatons, through popular animation icons and into the high tech labs of today's researchers into robotic action and intelligence, the author traces a fascinating trail of passion and development.

Synopsis:

What can account for Japan's unique relationship with robots as potential colleagues in life, rather than as potential adversaries? This volume attempts to answer this fundamental query by looking at Japan's historical connections with robots, its present fascination and leading technologies, and what the future holds.

About the Author

TIMOTHY N. HORNYAK moved to Japan in 1999 after working as a freelance science and technology journalist in Montreal. He worked at the international desk of Kyodo News in Tokyo, and has written about Japanese culture, technology and history for Scientific American, the Far Eastern Economic Review and other publications.

Product Details

ISBN:
9784770030122
Subtitle:
The Art and Science of Japanese Robots
Author:
Hornyak, Timothy N.
Author:
null, Timothy N.
Publisher:
Kodansha USA
Subject:
Social aspects
Subject:
Robotics
Subject:
Androids
Subject:
Sociology | Popular Culture
Subject:
Artificial Intelligence-Robotics
Copyright:
Publication Date:
September 2006
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
80 color plates
Pages:
160
Dimensions:
9.90x7.76x.76 in. 1.57 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. Follow the Story: How to Write... Used Trade Paper $9.00
  2. The religion of technology :the... Used Hardcover $6.95
  3. Inside the Robot Kingdom: Japan,... Used Hardcover $12.95
  4. Build Your Own Underwater Robot: And...
    New Spiral/comb $20.00

Related Subjects

Computers and Internet » Artificial Intelligence » Robotics
Reference » Science Reference » Experiments
Reference » Science Reference » Technology

Loving the Machine: The Art and Science of Japanese Robots Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.50 In Stock
Product details 160 pages Kodansha International (JPN) - English 9784770030122 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Japan stands out for its long love affair with humanoid robots, a phenomenon that is creating what will likely be the world's first mass robot culture. While U.S. companies have produced robot vacuum cleaners and war machines, Japan has created warm and fuzzy life-like robot therapy pets. While the U.S. makes movies like "Robocop" and "The Terminator," Japan is responsible for the friendly Mighty Atom, Aibo and Asimo. While the U.S. sponsors robot-on-robot destruction contests, Japan's feature tasks that mimic nonviolent human activities. The Steven Spielberg film, "AI," was a disaster at the world box office-except in Japan, where it was a huge hit. Why is this? What can account for Japan's unique relationship with robots as potential colleagues in life, rather than as potential adversaries? Loving the Machine attempts to answer this fundamental query by looking at Japan's historical connections with robots, its present fascination and leading technologies, and what the future holds. Through in-depth interviews with scientists, researchers, historians, artists, writers and others involved with or influenced by robots today, author Timothy N. Hornyak looks at robots in Japan from the perspectives of culture, psychology and history, as well as technology; and brings understanding to an endlessly evolving subject. From the Edo-period humanoid automatons, through popular animation icons and into the high tech labs of today's researchers into robotic action and intelligence, the author traces a fascinating trail of passion and development.
"Synopsis" by , What can account for Japan's unique relationship with robots as potential colleagues in life, rather than as potential adversaries? This volume attempts to answer this fundamental query by looking at Japan's historical connections with robots, its present fascination and leading technologies, and what the future holds.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.