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The Lazy Boys

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The Lazy Boys Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Carl Shuker's risky and harrowing first-person narrative is a punch in the stomach, a sustained cry; as harsh as Less Than Zero, as brutal as A Clockwork Orange.

Carl Shuker's protagonist, Richey Sauer, is an eighteen-year-old boy who begins college for no better reason than to escape the boredom of life with his middle-class family in Timaru, New Zealand. His aimlessness finds a mirror in his friends as they mangle their way through a first year in college. Richey quickly careens beyond apathy into a wordless anger, and he takes a brutal turn at an out-of-control dorm party, which lands him in front of the disciplinary committee on a sexual harassment charge.

Richey's housemates (Matt, who removes his face from any photograph; Nick, who cannot choose between his band or the decadent slipstream of organized sport; and sixteen-year old Ursula, whose utter passivity masks a hidden pain), join him in a freefall that forces them to face their most destructive desires.

Sex, violence, and drugs fuel the despair and alienation, and their biggest concern seems to be finding the right combination of alcohol and drugs to maintain an all-night high. Yet lurking in this chilling satire are clues to a deeper evasion and a more profound trauma. Richey's actions may seem unforgivable, but the unformed and distorted world he reflects is immediate and recognizable to a generation brought up in a society indifferent to its own nihilism.

Review:

"Richard 'Souse' Sauer, the 18-year-old antihero narrator of New Zealand writer Shuker's second novel (after Method Actors) is on a violent behavior jag that would make American Psycho's Patrick Bateman proud. Souse is a sensitive, self-destructive kid made uncomfortable by his first contact with independence as a marketing student at the University of Otago. Unofficially, he has switched to the more congenial discipline of beer guzzling, with a minor in bong hits; one beer-drenched night he does some awful, sexually abusive thing that he can't quite remember to 'this blond chick' at a party. Early on, Souse is revealed to be both a sadist (he tortures Snoopy, the family dog, and reads serial killer stories for inspiration) and a sensitive soul (he has a Sylvia Plath poem tacked up in his dorm room). After he leaves college and moves in with some similarly disaffected friends, Souse's days are foggy with parties, bars, self-pity and introspection — the latter two being pretty much identical. Unfortunately, the numbing regularity of Souse's days and nights (party, stupor, self-loathing) diminish the reader's interest long before Souse's final plunge into mayhem. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information)

Review:

"Richard 'Souse' Sauer, the 18-year-old antihero narrator of New Zealand writer Shuker's second novel (after Method Actors) is on a violent behavior jag that would make American Psycho's Patrick Bateman proud. Souse is a sensitive, self-destructive kid made uncomfortable by his first contact with independence as a marketing student at the University of Otago. Unofficially, he has switched to the more congenial discipline of beer guzzling, with a minor in bong hits; one beer-drenched night he does some awful, sexually abusive thing that he can't quite remember to 'this blond chick' at a party. Early on, Souse is revealed to be both a sadist (he tortures Snoopy, the family dog, and reads serial killer stories for inspiration) and a sensitive soul (he has a Sylvia Plath poem tacked up in his dorm room). After he leaves college and moves in with some similarly disaffected friends, Souse's days are foggy with parties, bars, self-pity and introspection — the latter two being pretty much identical. Unfortunately, the numbing regularity of Souse's days and nights (party, stupor, self-loathing) diminish the reader's interest long before Souse's final plunge into mayhem." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Absent clear guidance, take these lessons: Stay clear of beer bongs. And of this book, too." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

Carl Shuker's protagonist, Richard Sauer, heads off to college for no reason other than to escape the stultifying normalcy of his middle-class family in Timaru, New Zealand. He may appear ordinary in his aimlessness, mangling his way through his first year in college, but his bonging and banging, his anger and rage, take a brutal turn at an out-of-control dorm party which lands Richey in front of the disciplinary committee with a sexual harassment charge. Dropping out of school before he's thrown out, Richey and his housemates Matt, Nick, and Ursula begin a freefall that forces Richey to face his most destructive desires.

Sex, violence, mutilation, and drugs fuel the despair and alienation of these disaffected youth — those once innocent but now struggle to find the right combination of alcohol and drugs to keep an all-night buzz. Like a punch in the stomach or a sustained cry, Carl Shuker's risky and harrowing first person narrative is as visceral as Fight Club and as brutal as A Clockwork Orange. On the surface Richey's actions are unforgivable, but his unformed and distorted world is immediate and recognizable to a generation brought up in a society indifferent to its own nihilism.

About the Author

Carl Shuker won the 2006 Prize in Modern Letters for The Method Actors, the only debut to have ever been so honored, also an Entertainment Weekly Top 25 Summer Read. Carl was born in 1974 and is a graduate of Victoria University of Wellington.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781593761233
Author:
Shuker, Carl
Publisher:
Shoemaker & Hoard
Author:
Shuker, R. Carl
Subject:
Thrillers
Subject:
Youth
Subject:
College students
Subject:
Nihilism
Subject:
Apathy.
Subject:
Popular Fiction-Contemporary Thrillers
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20061031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 13.5 oz

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Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Popular Fiction » Contemporary Thrillers

The Lazy Boys Used Trade Paper
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$4.95 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Shoemaker & Hoard - English 9781593761233 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Richard 'Souse' Sauer, the 18-year-old antihero narrator of New Zealand writer Shuker's second novel (after Method Actors) is on a violent behavior jag that would make American Psycho's Patrick Bateman proud. Souse is a sensitive, self-destructive kid made uncomfortable by his first contact with independence as a marketing student at the University of Otago. Unofficially, he has switched to the more congenial discipline of beer guzzling, with a minor in bong hits; one beer-drenched night he does some awful, sexually abusive thing that he can't quite remember to 'this blond chick' at a party. Early on, Souse is revealed to be both a sadist (he tortures Snoopy, the family dog, and reads serial killer stories for inspiration) and a sensitive soul (he has a Sylvia Plath poem tacked up in his dorm room). After he leaves college and moves in with some similarly disaffected friends, Souse's days are foggy with parties, bars, self-pity and introspection — the latter two being pretty much identical. Unfortunately, the numbing regularity of Souse's days and nights (party, stupor, self-loathing) diminish the reader's interest long before Souse's final plunge into mayhem. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information)
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Richard 'Souse' Sauer, the 18-year-old antihero narrator of New Zealand writer Shuker's second novel (after Method Actors) is on a violent behavior jag that would make American Psycho's Patrick Bateman proud. Souse is a sensitive, self-destructive kid made uncomfortable by his first contact with independence as a marketing student at the University of Otago. Unofficially, he has switched to the more congenial discipline of beer guzzling, with a minor in bong hits; one beer-drenched night he does some awful, sexually abusive thing that he can't quite remember to 'this blond chick' at a party. Early on, Souse is revealed to be both a sadist (he tortures Snoopy, the family dog, and reads serial killer stories for inspiration) and a sensitive soul (he has a Sylvia Plath poem tacked up in his dorm room). After he leaves college and moves in with some similarly disaffected friends, Souse's days are foggy with parties, bars, self-pity and introspection — the latter two being pretty much identical. Unfortunately, the numbing regularity of Souse's days and nights (party, stupor, self-loathing) diminish the reader's interest long before Souse's final plunge into mayhem." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Absent clear guidance, take these lessons: Stay clear of beer bongs. And of this book, too."
"Synopsis" by ,
Carl Shuker's protagonist, Richard Sauer, heads off to college for no reason other than to escape the stultifying normalcy of his middle-class family in Timaru, New Zealand. He may appear ordinary in his aimlessness, mangling his way through his first year in college, but his bonging and banging, his anger and rage, take a brutal turn at an out-of-control dorm party which lands Richey in front of the disciplinary committee with a sexual harassment charge. Dropping out of school before he's thrown out, Richey and his housemates Matt, Nick, and Ursula begin a freefall that forces Richey to face his most destructive desires.

Sex, violence, mutilation, and drugs fuel the despair and alienation of these disaffected youth — those once innocent but now struggle to find the right combination of alcohol and drugs to keep an all-night buzz. Like a punch in the stomach or a sustained cry, Carl Shuker's risky and harrowing first person narrative is as visceral as Fight Club and as brutal as A Clockwork Orange. On the surface Richey's actions are unforgivable, but his unformed and distorted world is immediate and recognizable to a generation brought up in a society indifferent to its own nihilism.

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