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Math and the Mona Lisa: The Art and Science of Leonardo Da Vinci

by

Math and the Mona Lisa: The Art and Science of Leonardo Da Vinci Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Leonardo da Vinci was one of history's true geniuses, equally brilliant as an artist, scientist, and mathematician. Readers of The Da Vinci Code were given a glimpse of the mysterious connections between math, science, and Leonardo's art. Math and the Mona Lisa picks up where The Da Vinci Code left off, illuminating Leonardo's life and work to uncover connections that, until now, have been known only to scholars.

Following Leonardo's own unique model, Atalay searches for the internal dynamics of art and science, revealing to us the deep unity of the two cultures. He provides a broad overview of the development of science from the dawn of civilization to today's quantum mechanics. From this base of information, Atalay offers a fascinating view into Leonardo's restless intellect and modus operandi, allowing us to see the source of his ideas and to appreciate his art from a new perspective. William D. Phillips, who won the Nobel Prize in physics in 1997, writes of the author, Atalay is indeed a modern renaissance man, and he invites us to tap the power of synthesis that is Leonardo's model.

Review:

"In this readable, if less than compelling, disquisition on the close relationship of art and science, physics professor Atalay uses as his touchstone Leonardo da Vinci, of whom he says in his prologue: 'Had [da Vinci] been able to publish the scientific ruminations found in his manuscripts in his own time, our present level of sophistication in science and technology might have been reached one or two centuries earlier.' This assertion sets the buoyant tone for the rest of the book. The author marvels at the symmetries to be found in art and the natural world, discussing the Fibonacci series (0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8...) and the golden ratio related to it designated by the Greek letter phi (1.618...) with illustrated examples ranging from da Vinci's three portraits of women to the Great Pyramid and the Parthenon. He concedes the existence of asymmetry and dissonance, but chooses not to get into such subjects as chaos theory and fractals that don't fit his harmonious view of the universe. While Atalay makes an agreeable guide, he covers too much ground that will already be familiar to his likely audience. (Apr.) Foreword: Blurbs from Jamie Wyeth and Sherwin Nuland, not to mention the current rage for all things da Vinci thanks to Dan Brown, should give a boost." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"A masterful examination of the differences and similarities in the sciences and the arts." Jamie Wyeth

Review:

"[S]o insightful, so original and so well-reasoned that it immediately becomes an essential volume in the canon of Leonardiana. I read this monumental achievement in awe of the author's perceptions." Sherwin B. Nuland, author of How we Die

Review:

"There are few like [Da Vinci] today, but Atalay is indeed a modern renaissance man, and he invites us to tap the power of synthesis that is Leonardo's model." William D. Phillips, 1997 Nobel Prize Winner in Physics

Synopsis:

Math and the Mona Lisa sees the transcendant unity of art and science in almost every aspect of Leonardo's life and work. Atalay seeks the consilience of science and art — painting, architecture, sculpture, music, mathematics, physics, biology, astronomy, and engineering — and the unity of the two cultures. He delves deeply into the underlying mathematics and aesthetics of science and art, paying special attention to the mathematical sequence called the Fibonacci series and to the related notion of the "golden ratio" or "divine proportion" — the keys to understanding the unity of art and nature.

About the Author

Bulent Atalay is a professor of physics at the University of Mary Washington.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060851194
Author:
Atalay, Bulent
Publisher:
HarpPeren
Author:
by Bulent Atalay
Subject:
Individual Artist
Subject:
Criticism
Subject:
History - Renaissance
Subject:
Leonardo
Subject:
Art and science
Subject:
History -- Philosophy.
Subject:
History
Subject:
Criticism -- Theory.
Subject:
Individual Artists - General
Subject:
Criticism and interpretation
Subject:
Leonardo - Criticism and interpretation
Subject:
Art-Theory and Criticism
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade PB
Publication Date:
20060221
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
8.06x6.02x.88 in. .83 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Artists
Arts and Entertainment » Art » General
Arts and Entertainment » Art » Theory and Criticism
History and Social Science » World History » General
Reference » Science Reference » General
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » General
Science and Mathematics » Mathematics » History
Science and Mathematics » Mathematics » Popular Surveys and Recreational

Math and the Mona Lisa: The Art and Science of Leonardo Da Vinci Used Trade Paper
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Product details 336 pages HarperCollins Publishers - English 9780060851194 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In this readable, if less than compelling, disquisition on the close relationship of art and science, physics professor Atalay uses as his touchstone Leonardo da Vinci, of whom he says in his prologue: 'Had [da Vinci] been able to publish the scientific ruminations found in his manuscripts in his own time, our present level of sophistication in science and technology might have been reached one or two centuries earlier.' This assertion sets the buoyant tone for the rest of the book. The author marvels at the symmetries to be found in art and the natural world, discussing the Fibonacci series (0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8...) and the golden ratio related to it designated by the Greek letter phi (1.618...) with illustrated examples ranging from da Vinci's three portraits of women to the Great Pyramid and the Parthenon. He concedes the existence of asymmetry and dissonance, but chooses not to get into such subjects as chaos theory and fractals that don't fit his harmonious view of the universe. While Atalay makes an agreeable guide, he covers too much ground that will already be familiar to his likely audience. (Apr.) Foreword: Blurbs from Jamie Wyeth and Sherwin Nuland, not to mention the current rage for all things da Vinci thanks to Dan Brown, should give a boost." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "A masterful examination of the differences and similarities in the sciences and the arts."
"Review" by , "[S]o insightful, so original and so well-reasoned that it immediately becomes an essential volume in the canon of Leonardiana. I read this monumental achievement in awe of the author's perceptions."
"Review" by , "There are few like [Da Vinci] today, but Atalay is indeed a modern renaissance man, and he invites us to tap the power of synthesis that is Leonardo's model."
"Synopsis" by , Math and the Mona Lisa sees the transcendant unity of art and science in almost every aspect of Leonardo's life and work. Atalay seeks the consilience of science and art — painting, architecture, sculpture, music, mathematics, physics, biology, astronomy, and engineering — and the unity of the two cultures. He delves deeply into the underlying mathematics and aesthetics of science and art, paying special attention to the mathematical sequence called the Fibonacci series and to the related notion of the "golden ratio" or "divine proportion" — the keys to understanding the unity of art and nature.
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