Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    What I'm Giving | December 4, 2014

    Fred Armisen: IMG Fred Armisen: What I'm Giving



    At Powell's, we feel the holidays are the perfect time to share our love of books with those close to us. For this special blog series, we reached... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$10.95
List price: $16.00
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
2 Burnside Literature- A to Z
2 Hawthorne Literature- A to Z
1 Local Warehouse Literature- A to Z

Lord of the Flies: Great Books Edition (Penguin Great Books of the 20th Century)

by

Lord of the Flies: Great Books Edition (Penguin Great Books of the 20th Century) Cover

ISBN13: 9780140283334
ISBN10: 0140283331
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

William Golding's compelling story about a group of very ordinary small boys marooned on a coral island has become a modern classic. At first it seems as though it is all going to be great fun; but the fun before long becomes furious and life on the island turns into a nightmare of panic and death. As ordinary standards of behaviour collapse, the whole world the boys know collapses with them — the world of cricket and homework and adventure stories — and another world is revealed beneath, primitive and terrible.

Lord of the Flies remains as provocative today as when it was first published in 1954, igniting passionate debate with its startling, brutal portrait of human nature. Though critically acclaimed, it was largely ignored upon its initial publication. Yet soon it became a cult favorite among both students and literary critics who compared it to J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye in its influence on modern thought and literature.

Labeled a parable, an allegory, a myth, a morality tale, a parody, a political treatise, even a vision of the apocalypse, Lord of the Flies has established itself as a true classic.

From Our Staff:

In this bleak tale of a community gone awry, a group of schoolboys are stranded on a deserted island. The untenable situation soon devolves into chaos and horror. The ending is surprising and satisfying. Golding's creepy story is amazing!
Recommended by our staff at Powells.com

Review:

"Like any orthodox moralist Golding insists that Man is a fallen creature, but he refuses to hypostatize Evil or to locate it in a dimension of its own. On the contrary Beelzebub, Lord of the Flies, is Roger and Jack and you and I, ready to declare himself as soon as we permit him to." John Peter, Kenyon Review

Review:

"[S]parely and elegantly written....Lord of the Flies is a grim anti-pastoral in which adults are disguised as children who replicate the worst of their elders' heritage of ignorance, violence, and warfare." Joyce Carol Oates, New York Review of Books

Review:

"[T]his brilliant work is a frightening parody on man's return (in a few weeks) to that state of darkness from which it took him thousands of years to emerge. Fully to succeed, a fantasy must apprach very close to reality. Lord of the Flies does. It must also be superbly written. It is." The New York Times Book Review

Review:

Born in Cornwall, England, in 1911 and educated at Oxford University, William Gerald Golding's first book, Poems, was published in 1935. Following a stint in the Royal Navy and other diversions during and after World War II, Golding wrote Lord of the Flies while teaching school. This was the first of several novels including Pincher Martin, Free Fall, and The Inheritors and a play, The Brass Butterfly, which led to his being awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1983.

Synopsis:

William Golding's compelling story about a group of very ordinary small boys marooned on a coral island has become a modern classic. At first it seems as though it is all going to be great fun; but the fun before long becomes furious and life on the island turns into a nightmare of panic and death. As ordinary standards of behaviour collapse, the whole world the boys know collapses with them—the world of cricket and homework and adventure stories—and another world is revealed beneath, primitive and terrible.

Lord of the Flies remains as provocative today as when it was first published in 1954, igniting passionate debate with its startling, brutal portrait of human nature. Though critically acclaimed, it was largely ignored upon its initial publication. Yet soon it became a cult favorite among both students and literary critics who compared it to J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye in its influence on modern thought and literature.

Labeled a parable, an allegory, a myth, a morality tale, a parody, a political treatise, even a vision of the apocalypse, Lord of the Flies has established itself as a true classic.

Synopsis:

Few works in literature have received as much popular and critical attention as Nobel Laureate William Golding's Lord of the Flies. Since its publication in 1954, it has amassed a cult following, and has significantly contributed to our dystopian vision of the post-war era. When responding to the novel's dazzling power of intellectual insight, scholars and critics often invoke the works of Shakespeare, Freud, Rousseau, Sartre, Orwell, and Conrad.<P>Golding's aim to "trace the defect of society back to the defect of human nature" is elegantly pursued in this gripping adventure tale about a group of British schoolboys marooned on a tropical island. Alone in a world of uncharted possibilities, devoid of adult supervision or rules, the boys attempt to forge their own society, failing, however, in the face of terror, sin, and evil. Part parable, allegory, myth, parody, political treatise, and apocalyptic vision, Lord of the Flies is perhaps the most memorable tale about "the end of innocence, the darkness of man's heart".

About the Author

Born in Cornwall, England, in 1911 and educated at Oxford University, William Gerald Golding's first book, Poems, was published in 1935. Following a stint in the Royal Navy and other diversions during and after World War II, Golding wrote Lord of the Flies while teaching school. This was the first of several novels including Pincher Martin, Free Fall, and The Inheritors and a play, The Brass Butterfly, which led to his being awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1983.

Table of Contents

One: The Sound Of The Shell
Two: Fire On The Mountain
Three: Huts On The Beach
Four: Painted Faces And Long Hair
Five: Beast From Water
Six: Beast From Air
Seven: Shadows And Tall Trees
Eight: Gift For The Darkness
Nine: A View To A Death
Ten: The Shell And The Glasses
Eleven: Castle Rock
Twelve: Cry Of The Hunters

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

waitingtoleave, February 9, 2007 (view all comments by waitingtoleave)
When I read this in my high school English class, my best friend and I were convinced "Lord of the Flies" was a religious metaphor, and everyone else thought we were crazy, until the teacher sided with us. I cannot emphasize how helpful it can be to read Messiah stories to question your own faith; this can be a chance to test your own beliefs, or if you aren't Christian, a great look at how Christianity uses themes that translate to great storytelling. The Bible is the most popular book of all time, you know!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(9 of 18 readers found this comment helpful)
luckygreen, January 31, 2007 (view all comments by luckygreen)
An fantastic tail of the good and evil of mankind. Golding shows both the good and the inner demons of humans.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(7 of 17 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780140283334
Author:
Golding, William
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Location:
New York, N.Y., U.S.A.
Subject:
Boys
Subject:
Interpersonal Relations
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
British and irish fiction (fictional works by
Subject:
Adventure stories
Subject:
Americans
Subject:
Human relations
Subject:
Islands
Subject:
Golding, william, 1911-1993
Subject:
Adventure fiction
Subject:
Castaways
Subject:
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc.
Subject:
Fiction, Adult
Subject:
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Mass Market
Series:
Penguin Great Books of the 20th Century
Series Volume:
135
Publication Date:
19991031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
8.39x5.64x.54 in. .51 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

Other books you might like

  1. Threads of Time: Recollections Used Hardcover $6.95
  2. Nip the Buds, Shoot the Kids Used Trade Paper $6.50
  3. A Clockwork Orange (Norton Paperback...
    Used Trade Paper $7.95
  4. Riddley Walker :a novel Used Hardcover $5.95
  5. The Chocolate War
    Used Mass Market $3.50
  6. A Separate Peace
    Used Trade Paper $2.50

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Lord of the Flies: Great Books Edition (Penguin Great Books of the 20th Century) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.95 In Stock
Product details 192 pages Penguin Books - English 9780140283334 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Like any orthodox moralist Golding insists that Man is a fallen creature, but he refuses to hypostatize Evil or to locate it in a dimension of its own. On the contrary Beelzebub, Lord of the Flies, is Roger and Jack and you and I, ready to declare himself as soon as we permit him to."
"Review" by , "[S]parely and elegantly written....Lord of the Flies is a grim anti-pastoral in which adults are disguised as children who replicate the worst of their elders' heritage of ignorance, violence, and warfare."
"Review" by , "[T]his brilliant work is a frightening parody on man's return (in a few weeks) to that state of darkness from which it took him thousands of years to emerge. Fully to succeed, a fantasy must apprach very close to reality. Lord of the Flies does. It must also be superbly written. It is."
"Review" by , Born in Cornwall, England, in 1911 and educated at Oxford University, William Gerald Golding's first book, Poems, was published in 1935. Following a stint in the Royal Navy and other diversions during and after World War II, Golding wrote Lord of the Flies while teaching school. This was the first of several novels including Pincher Martin, Free Fall, and The Inheritors and a play, The Brass Butterfly, which led to his being awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1983.
"Synopsis" by ,
William Golding's compelling story about a group of very ordinary small boys marooned on a coral island has become a modern classic. At first it seems as though it is all going to be great fun; but the fun before long becomes furious and life on the island turns into a nightmare of panic and death. As ordinary standards of behaviour collapse, the whole world the boys know collapses with them—the world of cricket and homework and adventure stories—and another world is revealed beneath, primitive and terrible.

Lord of the Flies remains as provocative today as when it was first published in 1954, igniting passionate debate with its startling, brutal portrait of human nature. Though critically acclaimed, it was largely ignored upon its initial publication. Yet soon it became a cult favorite among both students and literary critics who compared it to J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye in its influence on modern thought and literature.

Labeled a parable, an allegory, a myth, a morality tale, a parody, a political treatise, even a vision of the apocalypse, Lord of the Flies has established itself as a true classic.

"Synopsis" by , Few works in literature have received as much popular and critical attention as Nobel Laureate William Golding's Lord of the Flies. Since its publication in 1954, it has amassed a cult following, and has significantly contributed to our dystopian vision of the post-war era. When responding to the novel's dazzling power of intellectual insight, scholars and critics often invoke the works of Shakespeare, Freud, Rousseau, Sartre, Orwell, and Conrad.<P>Golding's aim to "trace the defect of society back to the defect of human nature" is elegantly pursued in this gripping adventure tale about a group of British schoolboys marooned on a tropical island. Alone in a world of uncharted possibilities, devoid of adult supervision or rules, the boys attempt to forge their own society, failing, however, in the face of terror, sin, and evil. Part parable, allegory, myth, parody, political treatise, and apocalyptic vision, Lord of the Flies is perhaps the most memorable tale about "the end of innocence, the darkness of man's heart".

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.