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How I Became Stupid

by

How I Became Stupid Cover

ISBN13: 9780142004951
ISBN10: 0142004952
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A pop-culture farce from one of France's hottest new voices.

Ignorance is bliss, or so hopes Antoine, the lead character in Martin Page's stinging satire, How I Became Stupid — a modern-day Candide with a Darwin Award-like sensibility. A twenty-five-year-old Aramaic scholar, Antoine has had it with being brilliant and deeply self-aware in today's culture. So tortured is he by the depth of his perception and understanding of himself and the world around him that he vows to denounce his intelligence by any means necessary — in order to become "stupid" enough to be a happy, functioning member of society. What follows is a dark and hilarious odyssey as Antoine tries everything from alcoholism to stock-trading in order to lighten the burden of his brain on his soul.

Review:

"Philosophy meets farce in a slim debut novel that follows its hero on a madcap search for an antidote to intellectualism. Antoine, a shy 25-year-old, has determined that his sharp intelligence is the cause of his emotional distress. His first two stabs at numbing his overactive mind-an attempt at alcoholism and an overearnest foray into suicide — end before they begin. Like a modern-day Goldilocks, he finds his 'just right' solution in a prescription for Happyzac, which promises him a 'simpler, more beautiful' life. As the pills do their work, he decorates with posters of cars and women, plays Monopoly and video games instead of chess, bulks up at the gym and eats at McDonald's. An old acquaintance hires him as a stockbroker, and he accidentally becomes stinking rich. With his newfound wealth, Antoine tries to complete his stupidity spiral by mimicking the consumption habits of his peers. But when his boss shows him that he can also acquire women with money, his drugged-up consciousness starts percolating. With help from Flaubert's letters, a visit from the 'premature ghost' of a living pop singer and an exorcism-style intervention by his pre-stupidity friends, Antoine ends up as he predicted — back on the side of intelligence — in Page's smart, playful and critical look at human folly." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Imc.)

Review:

"[D]elightfully over-the-top....[T]here is always an audience — if not an enormous one — for novels that skewer thick-headed simplicity, and this absurdist comedy mounts a formidable attack." Booklist

Review:

"A wild yet powerful book." Elle

Review:

"Page's first novel deftly combines biting satire and hilarious slapstick. His characters are highly introspective misfits, and the story makes for insightful commentary on life in the 'developed' world. Recommended." Library Journal

Review:

"A harmonious and surprising mixture of optimism and nihilism." La Vie Magazine

Synopsis:

Ignorance is bliss, or so hopes Antoine, the lead character in Martin Page?s stinging satire, How I Became Stupid?a modern day Candide with a Darwin Award?like sensibility. A twenty-five-year-old Aramaic scholar, Antoine has had it with being brilliant and deeply self-aware in today?s culture. So tortured is he by the depth of his perception and understanding of himself and the world around him that he vows to denounce his intelligence by any means necessary?in order to become ?stupid? enough to be a happy, functioning member of society. What follows is a dark and hilarious odyssey as Antoine tries everything from alcoholism to stock-trading in order to lighten the burden of his brain on his soul.

About the Author

Martin Page was born in 1975. He is a student of anthropology. This is his first novel.

Adriana Hunter is the English translator of eighteen books. She has been short-listed for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize for the last three years.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

pdx lydia, December 29, 2009 (view all comments by pdx lydia)
"How I Became Stupid" is a short but witty and entertaining read. Tired of trying to live up to society's standards of happiness, Antoine decides to become an alcoholic and swim in a sea of ignorance. When his attempt hilariously fails, he does not give up his mission to become stupid. This satire about the meaning of happiness is well worth reading and full of insights about modern culture and what it means to find satisfaction and happiness in today's world.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
getdriver85, March 29, 2009 (view all comments by getdriver85)
Hilarious! It's a Must Read! I couldn't believe I had never heard of this book. I found while randomly searching through the shelf and it was worth every penny! Even more. I would buy again just to make sure that the author is compensated for amazing literally skills! YOU WON'T REGRET IT! TAKE A CHANCE AND YOU WILL SEE!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(3 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)
njm, December 14, 2007 (view all comments by njm)
This book will satisfy the sense of self-grandeur of anyone who secretly thinks that he or she is smarter than, well, everyone. This book is sharp, clever, and funny in a way that makes you think twice.
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(4 of 8 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780142004951
Author:
Page, Martin
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Translator:
Hunter, Adriana
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st U.S. ed.
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
December 2004
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
176
Dimensions:
7.04x5.12x.47 in. .29 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Humor » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Romance » General

How I Became Stupid Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
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Product details 176 pages Penguin Books - English 9780142004951 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Philosophy meets farce in a slim debut novel that follows its hero on a madcap search for an antidote to intellectualism. Antoine, a shy 25-year-old, has determined that his sharp intelligence is the cause of his emotional distress. His first two stabs at numbing his overactive mind-an attempt at alcoholism and an overearnest foray into suicide — end before they begin. Like a modern-day Goldilocks, he finds his 'just right' solution in a prescription for Happyzac, which promises him a 'simpler, more beautiful' life. As the pills do their work, he decorates with posters of cars and women, plays Monopoly and video games instead of chess, bulks up at the gym and eats at McDonald's. An old acquaintance hires him as a stockbroker, and he accidentally becomes stinking rich. With his newfound wealth, Antoine tries to complete his stupidity spiral by mimicking the consumption habits of his peers. But when his boss shows him that he can also acquire women with money, his drugged-up consciousness starts percolating. With help from Flaubert's letters, a visit from the 'premature ghost' of a living pop singer and an exorcism-style intervention by his pre-stupidity friends, Antoine ends up as he predicted — back on the side of intelligence — in Page's smart, playful and critical look at human folly." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Imc.)
"Review" by , "[D]elightfully over-the-top....[T]here is always an audience — if not an enormous one — for novels that skewer thick-headed simplicity, and this absurdist comedy mounts a formidable attack."
"Review" by , "A wild yet powerful book."
"Review" by , "Page's first novel deftly combines biting satire and hilarious slapstick. His characters are highly introspective misfits, and the story makes for insightful commentary on life in the 'developed' world. Recommended."
"Review" by , "A harmonious and surprising mixture of optimism and nihilism."
"Synopsis" by ,
Ignorance is bliss, or so hopes Antoine, the lead character in Martin Page?s stinging satire, How I Became Stupid?a modern day Candide with a Darwin Award?like sensibility. A twenty-five-year-old Aramaic scholar, Antoine has had it with being brilliant and deeply self-aware in today?s culture. So tortured is he by the depth of his perception and understanding of himself and the world around him that he vows to denounce his intelligence by any means necessary?in order to become ?stupid? enough to be a happy, functioning member of society. What follows is a dark and hilarious odyssey as Antoine tries everything from alcoholism to stock-trading in order to lighten the burden of his brain on his soul.

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