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My Last Best Friend

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My Last Best Friend Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

As Ida May begins fourth grade, she is determined never to make another best friend--because her last best friend moved away. This is a doable plan at first. Thanks to bratty, bossy Jenna Drews who hates Ida, no one in class has ever really noticed her before.  
    
It's when the sparkly Stacey Merriweather comes to her school that her plan goes awry. Ida reaches out despite her fear, but doesn't say hello—instead she writes Stacey anonymous notes. Soon their friendship develops without Ida ever having to reveal her real identity. Until she has no choice. And that's when the true friendship begins.

    

Debut author Julie Bowe tells a charming story that will win the heart of any girl who's faced her fear sideways.

Review:

"Starting fourth grade is a lonely business for Ida May since Elizabeth, her "last best friend," moved away. To make things worse, mean Jenna Drews, daughter of the PTA president, is making Ida's life miserable by taunting Ida every chance she gets. Ida wishes that she could find a new best friend in Stacey Merriweather, a girl with a "big-crayon" smile, who has just moved to town. But part of Ida fears that if she gets close to Stacey, the girl might disappear just as Elizabeth did ("Trust me, you don't want to get too close to big-crayon smiles. That's because people with big-crayon smiles don't stick around very long," Ida laments). In this heartfelt, slice-of-life story, first-time novelist Bowe explores both the uncertainties and rewards of friendship as she traces her wistful heroine's first few weeks of school. Ida's hurt at being bullied by Jenna is skillfully evoked, but what readers will feel most strongly is Ida's yearning to share simple pleasures like "Messy art projects. Corny jokes." and "Mild cheddar cheese" with someone special, who likes her just for who she is. Throughout the novel, Ida cautiously approaches Stacey, using anonymous notes as a vehicle to introduce herself to the newcomer. Stacey's replies to the secret messages reveal that she has told some "emergency" lies about her living situation and may have to leave town soon, just as Ida has feared. If the book's resolution is a little too tidy, Bowe's characters emerge fully formed. Ida embodies the universal longing to connect with a kindred spirit. Ages 7-10. (Apr.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"'Starting fourth grade is a lonely business for Ida May since Elizabeth, her 'last best friend,' moved away. To make things worse, mean Jenna Drews, daughter of the PTA president, is making Ida's life miserable by taunting Ida every chance she gets. Ida wishes that she could find a new best friend in Stacey Merriweather, a girl with a 'big-crayon' smile, who has just moved to town. But part of Ida fears that if she gets close to Stacey, the girl might disappear just as Elizabeth did ('Trust me, you don't want to get too close to big-crayon smiles. That's because people with big-crayon smiles don't stick around very long,' Ida laments). In this heartfelt, slice-of-life story, first-time novelist Bowe explores both the uncertainties and rewards of friendship as she traces her wistful heroine's first few weeks of school. Ida's hurt at being bullied by Jenna is skillfully evoked, but what readers will feel most strongly is Ida's yearning to share simple pleasures like 'Messy art projects. Corny jokes.' and 'Mild cheddar cheese' with someone special, who likes her just for who she is. Throughout the novel, Ida cautiously approaches Stacey, using anonymous notes as a vehicle to introduce herself to the newcomer. Stacey's replies to the secret messages reveal that she has told some 'emergency' lies about her living situation and may have to leave town soon, just as Ida has feared. If the book's resolution is a little too tidy, Bowe's characters emerge fully formed. Ida embodies the universal longing to connect with a kindred spirit. Ages 7-10. (Apr.)' Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Fourth grade is tough for self-deprecating misfit Ida May when her quirky best friend moves away

About the Author

JULIE BOWE lives in Wisconsin. My Last Best Friend is her first novel for young readers.

 

Product Details

ISBN:
9780152057770
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt P
Subject:
Girls & Women
Author:
Bowe, Julie
Subject:
Family - Marriage & Divorce
Subject:
Situations / Friendship
Subject:
Social Issues - Friendship
Subject:
Friendship
Subject:
Schools
Subject:
General Juvenile Fiction
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-Friendship
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series:
Friends for Keeps
Publication Date:
20070431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 2 to 5
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Jacket illustration by Jana Christy
Pages:
160
Dimensions:
7.5 x 5 in 0.31 lb
Age Level:
07-10

Related Subjects

Children's » Middle Readers » General
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Friendship

My Last Best Friend
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 160 pages Harcourt - English 9780152057770 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Starting fourth grade is a lonely business for Ida May since Elizabeth, her "last best friend," moved away. To make things worse, mean Jenna Drews, daughter of the PTA president, is making Ida's life miserable by taunting Ida every chance she gets. Ida wishes that she could find a new best friend in Stacey Merriweather, a girl with a "big-crayon" smile, who has just moved to town. But part of Ida fears that if she gets close to Stacey, the girl might disappear just as Elizabeth did ("Trust me, you don't want to get too close to big-crayon smiles. That's because people with big-crayon smiles don't stick around very long," Ida laments). In this heartfelt, slice-of-life story, first-time novelist Bowe explores both the uncertainties and rewards of friendship as she traces her wistful heroine's first few weeks of school. Ida's hurt at being bullied by Jenna is skillfully evoked, but what readers will feel most strongly is Ida's yearning to share simple pleasures like "Messy art projects. Corny jokes." and "Mild cheddar cheese" with someone special, who likes her just for who she is. Throughout the novel, Ida cautiously approaches Stacey, using anonymous notes as a vehicle to introduce herself to the newcomer. Stacey's replies to the secret messages reveal that she has told some "emergency" lies about her living situation and may have to leave town soon, just as Ida has feared. If the book's resolution is a little too tidy, Bowe's characters emerge fully formed. Ida embodies the universal longing to connect with a kindred spirit. Ages 7-10. (Apr.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "'Starting fourth grade is a lonely business for Ida May since Elizabeth, her 'last best friend,' moved away. To make things worse, mean Jenna Drews, daughter of the PTA president, is making Ida's life miserable by taunting Ida every chance she gets. Ida wishes that she could find a new best friend in Stacey Merriweather, a girl with a 'big-crayon' smile, who has just moved to town. But part of Ida fears that if she gets close to Stacey, the girl might disappear just as Elizabeth did ('Trust me, you don't want to get too close to big-crayon smiles. That's because people with big-crayon smiles don't stick around very long,' Ida laments). In this heartfelt, slice-of-life story, first-time novelist Bowe explores both the uncertainties and rewards of friendship as she traces her wistful heroine's first few weeks of school. Ida's hurt at being bullied by Jenna is skillfully evoked, but what readers will feel most strongly is Ida's yearning to share simple pleasures like 'Messy art projects. Corny jokes.' and 'Mild cheddar cheese' with someone special, who likes her just for who she is. Throughout the novel, Ida cautiously approaches Stacey, using anonymous notes as a vehicle to introduce herself to the newcomer. Stacey's replies to the secret messages reveal that she has told some 'emergency' lies about her living situation and may have to leave town soon, just as Ida has feared. If the book's resolution is a little too tidy, Bowe's characters emerge fully formed. Ida embodies the universal longing to connect with a kindred spirit. Ages 7-10. (Apr.)' Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
Fourth grade is tough for self-deprecating misfit Ida May when her quirky best friend moves away

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