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12 Local Warehouse Psychology- Autism

Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's

by

Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's Cover

ISBN13: 9780307396181
ISBN10: 0307396185
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Ever since he was small, John Robison had longed to connect with other people, but by the time he was a teenager, his odd habits — an inclination to blurt out non sequiturs, avoid eye contact, dismantle radios, and dig five-foot holes (and stick his younger brother in them) — had earned him the label "social deviant." No guidance came from his mother, who conversed with light fixtures, or his father, who spent evenings pickling himself in sherry. It was no wonder he gravitated to machines, which could, at least, be counted on.

After fleeing his parents and dropping out of high school, his savant-like ability to visualize electronic circuits landed him a gig with KISS, for whom he created their legendary fire-breathing guitars. Later, he drifted into a "real" job, as an engineer for a major toy company. But the higher Robison rose in the company, the more he had to pretend to be "normal" and do what he simply couldn't: communicate. It wasn't worth the paycheck.

It was not until he was forty that an insightful therapist told him he had the form of autism called Asperger's syndrome. That understanding transformed the way Robison saw himself — and the world.

Look Me in the Eye is the moving, darkly funny story of growing up with Asperger's at a time when the diagnosis simply didn't exist. A born storyteller, Robison takes you inside the head of a boy whom teachers and other adults regarded as "defective," who could not avail himself of KISS's endless supply of groupies, and who still has a peculiar aversion to using people's given names (he calls his wife "Unit Two"). He also provides a fascinating reverse angle on the younger brother he left at the mercy of their nutty parents — the boy who would later change his name to Augusten Burroughs and write the bestselling memoir Running with Scissors.

Ultimately, this is the story of Robison's journey from his world into ours, and his new life as a husband, father, and successful small business owner — repairing his beloved high-end automobiles. It's a strange, sly, indelible account — sometimes alien, yet always deeply human.

Review:

"Deeply felt and often darkly funny, Look Me in the Eye is a delight." People magazine

Review:

"It's a fantastic life story (highlights include building guitars for KISS) told with grace, humor, and a bracing lack of sentimentality." Entertainment Weekly

Review:

"Dramatic and revealing." Boston Globe

Review:

"Lean, powerful in its descriptive accuracy and engaging in its understated humor...Emotionally gripping." Chicago Tribune

Review:

"Not only does Robison share with his famous brother, Augusten Burroughs (Running With Scissors), a talent for writing; he also has that same deadpan, biting humor that's so irresistible." Elle magazine

Review:

"This is no misery memoir...[Robison] is a gifted storyteller with a deadpan sense of humour and the book is a rollicking read." Times (London)

Review:

"Affecting, on occasion surprisingly comic memoir about growing up with Aspergers syndrome....The view from inside this little-understood disorder offers both cold comfort and real hope, which makes it an exceptionally useful contribution to the literature." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

Robison delivers a moving, darkly funny memoir of growing up with Asperger's at a time when the diagnosis simply didn't exist. A born storyteller, Robison takes readers inside the head of a boy whom teachers and other adults regarded as defective.

Synopsis:

A cutting-edge account of the latest science of autism, from the best-selling author and advocate

Synopsis:

andldquo;The right brain has created the right book for right now.andrdquo;andmdash;Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Temple Grandin may be the most famous person with autism, a condition that affects 1 in 88 children. Since her birth in 1947, our understanding of it has undergone a great transformation, leading to more hope than ever before that we may finally learn the causes of and treatments for autism.

Weaving her own experience with remarkable new discoveries, Grandin introduces the advances in neuroimaging and genetic research that link brain science to behavior, even sharing her own brain scan to show which anomalies might explain common symptoms. Most excitingly, she argues that raising and educating kids on the autism spectrum must focus on their long-overlooked strengths to foster their unique contributions. The Autistic Brain brings Grandinandrsquo;s singular perspective into the heart of the autism revolution.

andquot;[Grandinandrsquo;s] most insightful work to date . . . The Autistic Brain is something anyone could benefit from reading, and I recommend it to anyone with a personal or professional connection to autism or neurological difference.andquot;andmdash;John Elder Robison, author of Look Me in the Eye

andquot;The Autistic Brain can both enlighten readers with little exposure to autism and offer hope and compassion to those who live with the condition.andquot;andmdash;Scientific American

Synopsis:

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

“As sweet and funny and sad and true and heartfelt a memoir as one could find.” —from the foreword by Augusten Burroughs

Ever since he was young, John Robison longed to connect with other people, but by the time he was a teenager, his odd habits—an inclination to blurt out non sequiturs, avoid eye contact, dismantle radios, and dig five-foot holes (and stick his younger brother, Augusten Burroughs, in them)—had earned him the label “social deviant.” It was not until he was forty that he was diagnosed with a form of autism called Asperger’s syndrome. That understanding transformed the way he saw himself—and the world. A born storyteller, Robison has written a moving, darkly funny memoir about a life that has taken him from developing exploding guitars for KISS to building a family of his own. It’s a strange, sly, indelible account—sometimes alien yet always deeply human.

About the Author

JOhn Elder Robison lives with his wife and son in Amherst, Massachusetts. His company, J E Robison Service, repairs and restores fine European automobiles.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 4 comments:

Mark Graham, January 1, 2012 (view all comments by Mark Graham)
A look at the world from someone with Asperger's.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
MAA, July 27, 2009 (view all comments by MAA)
Great read! Straightforward storytelling in concrete language, demonstrating unexpected facility illustrating the daily, lifelong challenges that those on the Asperger/autism spectrum confront. More importantly, showing that insight into the differences, and advantages, of being on that spectrum, can lead to a happier, more fulfilling, life. A good book for anyone (everyone?) who has felt 'different' and misunderstood; and for those who interact with them. Oh, heck, I recommend it to everyone -- whether you have experienced any of this or not, it is a great window into appreciating differences.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
Terri from Illinois, July 12, 2009 (view all comments by Terri from Illinois)
This book helped me realize some of the inner feelings and thoughts of a person with Asperger's Syndrome. As a teacher of special education for 34 years, I appreciate reading books written by authors who have first hand experience with these syndromes. John Elder Robinson tells of how he learns to deal with and compensate for Asperger's characteristics, even though he didn't realize that he was "different" until the age of 40.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(3 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 4 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307396181
Subtitle:
My Life with Asperger's
Author:
Robison, John Elder
Author:
Various
Author:
Grandin, Temple
Author:
Panek, Richard
Publisher:
Broadway Books
Subject:
Psychopathology - Autism
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Specific Groups - Special Needs
Subject:
Biography - General
Subject:
Psychology-Autism
Subject:
memoir;Aspergers syndrome;autism;autism spectrum;augusten burroughs;coming of age;psychology;dysfunctional family
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20080909
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
24 b/w photos and illustrations
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
8 x 5.31 in 0.44 lb

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Related Subjects


Biography » General
Featured Titles » Biography
Health and Self-Help » Child Psychology » Autism
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Asperger Syndrome
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Autism
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Personality Disorders

Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.50 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Broadway - English 9780307396181 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Deeply felt and often darkly funny, Look Me in the Eye is a delight."
"Review" by , "It's a fantastic life story (highlights include building guitars for KISS) told with grace, humor, and a bracing lack of sentimentality."
"Review" by , "Dramatic and revealing."
"Review" by , "Lean, powerful in its descriptive accuracy and engaging in its understated humor...Emotionally gripping."
"Review" by , "Not only does Robison share with his famous brother, Augusten Burroughs (Running With Scissors), a talent for writing; he also has that same deadpan, biting humor that's so irresistible."
"Review" by , "This is no misery memoir...[Robison] is a gifted storyteller with a deadpan sense of humour and the book is a rollicking read."
"Review" by , "Affecting, on occasion surprisingly comic memoir about growing up with Aspergers syndrome....The view from inside this little-understood disorder offers both cold comfort and real hope, which makes it an exceptionally useful contribution to the literature."
"Synopsis" by , Robison delivers a moving, darkly funny memoir of growing up with Asperger's at a time when the diagnosis simply didn't exist. A born storyteller, Robison takes readers inside the head of a boy whom teachers and other adults regarded as defective.
"Synopsis" by ,
A cutting-edge account of the latest science of autism, from the best-selling author and advocate
"Synopsis" by ,
andldquo;The right brain has created the right book for right now.andrdquo;andmdash;Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Temple Grandin may be the most famous person with autism, a condition that affects 1 in 88 children. Since her birth in 1947, our understanding of it has undergone a great transformation, leading to more hope than ever before that we may finally learn the causes of and treatments for autism.

Weaving her own experience with remarkable new discoveries, Grandin introduces the advances in neuroimaging and genetic research that link brain science to behavior, even sharing her own brain scan to show which anomalies might explain common symptoms. Most excitingly, she argues that raising and educating kids on the autism spectrum must focus on their long-overlooked strengths to foster their unique contributions. The Autistic Brain brings Grandinandrsquo;s singular perspective into the heart of the autism revolution.

andquot;[Grandinandrsquo;s] most insightful work to date . . . The Autistic Brain is something anyone could benefit from reading, and I recommend it to anyone with a personal or professional connection to autism or neurological difference.andquot;andmdash;John Elder Robison, author of Look Me in the Eye

andquot;The Autistic Brain can both enlighten readers with little exposure to autism and offer hope and compassion to those who live with the condition.andquot;andmdash;Scientific American

"Synopsis" by , NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

“As sweet and funny and sad and true and heartfelt a memoir as one could find.” —from the foreword by Augusten Burroughs

Ever since he was young, John Robison longed to connect with other people, but by the time he was a teenager, his odd habits—an inclination to blurt out non sequiturs, avoid eye contact, dismantle radios, and dig five-foot holes (and stick his younger brother, Augusten Burroughs, in them)—had earned him the label “social deviant.” It was not until he was forty that he was diagnosed with a form of autism called Asperger’s syndrome. That understanding transformed the way he saw himself—and the world. A born storyteller, Robison has written a moving, darkly funny memoir about a life that has taken him from developing exploding guitars for KISS to building a family of his own. It’s a strange, sly, indelible account—sometimes alien yet always deeply human.

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