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1 Hawthorne Journalism- Media Studies

No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies

by

No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies Cover

 

Awards

Winner of Canada's National Business Book Award, 2001

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

There's a bad mood rising against the corporate brands. No Logo is the warning on the label.

Once a poster boy for the new economy, Bill Gates has become global whipping boy. Nike's swoosh — the marketing success of the nineties — is now equated with sweatshop labour, and teenage MacDonald's workers are joining the Teamsters. What is going on? No Logo, an incisive and insightful report from the frontlines of mounting backlash against multinational corporations, explains why some of the most revered brands in the world are finding themselves on the wrong end of a bottle of spray paint, a computer hack, or an international anti-corporate campaign.

No Logo uncovers a betrayal of the central promises of the information age: choice, interactivity, and increased freedom. And as job security disappears, the respectful reverence which corporations enjoyed as engines of the economy is also dissipating — as is their protection from worker and citizen rage.

Equal parts cultural analysis, political manifesto, mall-rat memoir, and journalistic exposé, No Logo is the first book to put the new resistance into pop-historical and clear economic perspective. Naomi Klein tells a story of rebellion and self-determination in the face of our new branded world.

Review:

"A complete, user-friendly handbook on the negative effects that '90s uberbrand marketing has had on culture, work, and consumer voice." The Village Voice

Review:

"Energetic and optimistic, Ms. Klein incarnates [her] generation's reinvention of the North American left." The New York Times

Review:

"Klein is a sharp cultural critic, and a flawless storyteller. Her analysis is thorough and thoroughly engaging." Newsweek.com

Review:

"No Logo has been a word-of-mouth sensation, giving voice to a generation of people under thirty who have never related to politics until now. The band Radiohead were so inspired by No Logo that they have banned corporate advertising from their British tour, deeming all venues 'logo free.'...Naomi Klein might just be helping re-invent politics for a new generation." Katharine Viner, The Guardian

Review:

"Klein's dense, fact-heavy book is compelling, enlightening, damning, and a surprisingly good read." Nathan Rabin, The Onion A.V. Club

Review:

"[B]y the end of the first chapter you'll be en route to the nearest McDonalds with a crate of Molotov cocktails....[No Logo] is likely to disturb even the most hardened of cynics....[A] powerful read — Chomsky without the paranoia — and, if you have even the slightest interest in popular culture, it's an essential one." Gary Marshall, Spike Magazine

Review:

"No Logo is emblematic of our day...and a handbook for activists of all ages." Jodi Molen, The Progressive

Review:

"What corporations fear most are consumers who ask questions. Naomi Klein offers us the arguments with which to take on the superbrands." Billy Bragg

Synopsis:

With a new Afterword to the 2002 edition. No Logo employs journalistic savvy and personal testament to detail the insidious practices and far-reaching effects of corporate marketing—and the powerful potential of a growing activist sect that will surely alter the course of the 21st century. First published before the World Trade Organization protests in Seattle, this is an infuriating, inspiring, and altogether pioneering work of cultural criticism that investigates money, marketing, and the anti-corporate movement.

As global corporations compete for the hearts and wallets of consumers who not only buy their products but willingly advertise them from head to toe—witness todays schoolbooks, superstores, sporting arenas, and brand-name synergy—a new generation has begun to battle consumerism with its own best weapons. In this provocative, well-written study, a front-line report on that battle, we learn how the Nike swoosh has changed from an athletic status-symbol to a metaphor for sweatshop labor, how teenaged McDonalds workers are risking their jobs to join the Teamsters, and how “culture jammers” utilize spray paint, computer-hacking acumen, and anti-propagandist wordplay to undercut the slogans and meanings of billboard ads (as in “Joe Chemo” for “Joe Camel”).

No Logo will challenge and enlighten students of sociology, economics, popular culture, international affairs, and marketing.

“This book is not another account of the power of the select group of corporate Goliaths that have gathered to form our de facto global government. Rather, it is an attempt to analyze and document the forces opposing corporate rule, and to lay out the particular set of cultural and economic conditions that made the emergence of that opposition inevitable.”—Naomi Klein, from her Introduction

Synopsis:

As global corporations compete for the loyal hearts, minds, and bodies of consumers who not only buy their products but willingly advertise them from head to toe, from schoolbooks to sporting arenas, a new generation is beginning to fight consumerism with its own best weapons. At once infuriating, provocative, and inspiring, No Logo uncovers the insidious practices and effects of corporate marketing--and the powerful potential of a growing activist movement that is changing the face of the 21st century.

About the Author

Naomi Klein, born in Montreal in 1970, is an award-winning journalist. She writes a weekly column in The Globe and Mail, Canada's national newspaper, and is also a frequent columnist for the British Guardian. For the past five years, Klein has traveled throughout North America, Asia, and Europe, tracking the rise of anti-corporate activism. She is a frequent media commentator and has guest-lectured at Harvard, Yale, and New York University. She lives in Toronto. For more information, please visit her website at www.nologo.org.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312271923
Subtitle:
Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies
Author:
Klein, Naomi
Publisher:
Picador
Location:
New York, N.Y.
Subject:
Non-Classifiable
Subject:
Advertising & Promotion
Subject:
Corporations
Subject:
Brand name products
Subject:
International business enterprises
Subject:
Social responsibility of business
Subject:
Economics - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
1st Picador USA pbk. ed.
Series Volume:
10381
Publication Date:
January 2001
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Includes bandw photos throughout
Pages:
512
Dimensions:
9.02x7.00x1.03 in. 2.90 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Business » Marketing
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » American Studies » Popular Culture
History and Social Science » Economics » Global Economics
History and Social Science » Journalism » Media Studies

No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 512 pages Picador USA - English 9780312271923 Reviews:
"Review" by , "A complete, user-friendly handbook on the negative effects that '90s uberbrand marketing has had on culture, work, and consumer voice."
"Review" by , "Energetic and optimistic, Ms. Klein incarnates [her] generation's reinvention of the North American left."
"Review" by , "Klein is a sharp cultural critic, and a flawless storyteller. Her analysis is thorough and thoroughly engaging."
"Review" by , "No Logo has been a word-of-mouth sensation, giving voice to a generation of people under thirty who have never related to politics until now. The band Radiohead were so inspired by No Logo that they have banned corporate advertising from their British tour, deeming all venues 'logo free.'...Naomi Klein might just be helping re-invent politics for a new generation."
"Review" by , "Klein's dense, fact-heavy book is compelling, enlightening, damning, and a surprisingly good read."
"Review" by , "[B]y the end of the first chapter you'll be en route to the nearest McDonalds with a crate of Molotov cocktails....[No Logo] is likely to disturb even the most hardened of cynics....[A] powerful read — Chomsky without the paranoia — and, if you have even the slightest interest in popular culture, it's an essential one."
"Review" by , "No Logo is emblematic of our day...and a handbook for activists of all ages."
"Review" by , "What corporations fear most are consumers who ask questions. Naomi Klein offers us the arguments with which to take on the superbrands."
"Synopsis" by ,
With a new Afterword to the 2002 edition. No Logo employs journalistic savvy and personal testament to detail the insidious practices and far-reaching effects of corporate marketing—and the powerful potential of a growing activist sect that will surely alter the course of the 21st century. First published before the World Trade Organization protests in Seattle, this is an infuriating, inspiring, and altogether pioneering work of cultural criticism that investigates money, marketing, and the anti-corporate movement.

As global corporations compete for the hearts and wallets of consumers who not only buy their products but willingly advertise them from head to toe—witness todays schoolbooks, superstores, sporting arenas, and brand-name synergy—a new generation has begun to battle consumerism with its own best weapons. In this provocative, well-written study, a front-line report on that battle, we learn how the Nike swoosh has changed from an athletic status-symbol to a metaphor for sweatshop labor, how teenaged McDonalds workers are risking their jobs to join the Teamsters, and how “culture jammers” utilize spray paint, computer-hacking acumen, and anti-propagandist wordplay to undercut the slogans and meanings of billboard ads (as in “Joe Chemo” for “Joe Camel”).

No Logo will challenge and enlighten students of sociology, economics, popular culture, international affairs, and marketing.

“This book is not another account of the power of the select group of corporate Goliaths that have gathered to form our de facto global government. Rather, it is an attempt to analyze and document the forces opposing corporate rule, and to lay out the particular set of cultural and economic conditions that made the emergence of that opposition inevitable.”—Naomi Klein, from her Introduction

"Synopsis" by , As global corporations compete for the loyal hearts, minds, and bodies of consumers who not only buy their products but willingly advertise them from head to toe, from schoolbooks to sporting arenas, a new generation is beginning to fight consumerism with its own best weapons. At once infuriating, provocative, and inspiring, No Logo uncovers the insidious practices and effects of corporate marketing--and the powerful potential of a growing activist movement that is changing the face of the 21st century.
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