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Fever: How Rock & Roll Transformed Gender in America

Fever: How Rock & Roll Transformed Gender in America Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In Fever, music critic Tim Riley argues that while political and athletic role models have let us down, rock and roll has provided enduring role models for men and women. From Elvis Presley to Tina Turner to Bruce Springsteen to Kurt Cobain and Courtney Love, Riley makes a persuasive case that rock and roll, far from the corrosive force that conservative critics make it out to be, has instead been a positive influence in people's lives, laying out gender-defying role models far more enduringly than movies, TV, or "real life."

Review:

"When Elvis walked onstage and sang 'Love Me Tender' or 'Hound Dog,' he changed and challenged more than just popular music. According to Riley, his gyrating hips and his invitations to nights of lusty love and rock and roll altered his audience's thinking about sexuality and gender relations, challenging their parents' more circumspect ideas and opening up new ways of freely experiencing their sexual selves. In this rather simplistic study of the impact of rock and roll on sexuality and gender, Riley opens with a comparison of John Wayne's and Elvis's sexual personas. Of course, Elvis shakes the foundations of male sexuality with his openness, his eagerness for experience and his dynamic and forthright declarations of the pleasures of love. While Elvis is shaking up the males, the girl groups — the Chantels, the Ronettes, the Crystals, the Shirelles — are providing a similar experience for the women. Perhaps sex could be saved for marriage, the songs said, but the singers insisted in their lyrics that women could experience plenty of sexual pleasures outside of marriage and that they should. Riley weaves this thesis through the history of rock and roll, tracing its development through Tina Turner, Bonnie Raitt, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Kurt Cobain and Courtney Love, among others. Whether or not rock and roll played the largely positive role in changing ideas about gender remains questionable, for many listeners — and many women in rock, such as Grace Slick — would contend that men's view of women has not changed much since John Wayne. Moreover, Riley's view is very selective, for much of rock music reinforces gender stereotypes, encouraging its audiences to do the same. While Riley's book contains some interesting moments, it fails to go far enough in looking at rock's more checkered history of gender relations. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

An insightful look at how rock & roll has changed the way men and women think about themselves--and each other.

About the Author

Tim Riley is the author of Tell Me Why and Hard Rain. His commentary on pop culture has appeared in The Washington Post, Boston magazine, The Boston Phoenix, Salon, and Feed. He is currently the pop critic for NPRs Here and Now. He lives in Boston, Massachusetts.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312286118
Subtitle:
How Rock 'n' Roll Transformed Gender in America
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Author:
Riley, Tim
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Rock
Subject:
Rock music
Subject:
Gender Studies
Subject:
Gender identity in music.
Subject:
Popular Culture - General
Subject:
Genres & Styles - Rock
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series Volume:
1170
Publication Date:
20040601
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Includes an index
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Rock » Reference and Criticism

Fever: How Rock & Roll Transformed Gender in America
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Product details 256 pages St. Martin's Press - English 9780312286118 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "When Elvis walked onstage and sang 'Love Me Tender' or 'Hound Dog,' he changed and challenged more than just popular music. According to Riley, his gyrating hips and his invitations to nights of lusty love and rock and roll altered his audience's thinking about sexuality and gender relations, challenging their parents' more circumspect ideas and opening up new ways of freely experiencing their sexual selves. In this rather simplistic study of the impact of rock and roll on sexuality and gender, Riley opens with a comparison of John Wayne's and Elvis's sexual personas. Of course, Elvis shakes the foundations of male sexuality with his openness, his eagerness for experience and his dynamic and forthright declarations of the pleasures of love. While Elvis is shaking up the males, the girl groups — the Chantels, the Ronettes, the Crystals, the Shirelles — are providing a similar experience for the women. Perhaps sex could be saved for marriage, the songs said, but the singers insisted in their lyrics that women could experience plenty of sexual pleasures outside of marriage and that they should. Riley weaves this thesis through the history of rock and roll, tracing its development through Tina Turner, Bonnie Raitt, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Kurt Cobain and Courtney Love, among others. Whether or not rock and roll played the largely positive role in changing ideas about gender remains questionable, for many listeners — and many women in rock, such as Grace Slick — would contend that men's view of women has not changed much since John Wayne. Moreover, Riley's view is very selective, for much of rock music reinforces gender stereotypes, encouraging its audiences to do the same. While Riley's book contains some interesting moments, it fails to go far enough in looking at rock's more checkered history of gender relations. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , An insightful look at how rock & roll has changed the way men and women think about themselves--and each other.
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