The Good, the Bad, and the Hungry Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


The Powell's Playlist | June 18, 2014

Daniel H. Wilson: IMG The Powell’s Playlist: Daniel H. Wilson



Like many writers, I'm constantly haunting coffee shops with a laptop out and my headphones on. I listen to a lot of music while I write, and songs... Continue »

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$17.50
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton Psychology- Autism

George and Sam: Two Boys, One Family, and Autism

by

George and Sam: Two Boys, One Family, and Autism Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

For the parents, families, and friends of the 1 in 250 autistic children born annually in the United States, George and Sam provides a unique look into the life of the autistic child.

Charlotte Moore has three children, George, Sam, and Jake. George and Sam are autistic. George and Sam takes the reader from the births of each of the two boys, along the painstaking path to diagnosis, interventions, schooling and more. She writes powerfully about her family and her sons, and allows readers to see the boys behind the label of autism. Their often puzzling behavior, unusual food aversions, and the different ways that autism effects George and Sam lend deeper insight into this confounding disorder.

George and Sam emerge from her narrative as distinct, wonderful, and at times frustrating children who both are autistic through and through. Moore does not feel the need to search for cause or cure, but simply to find the best ways to help her sons. She conveys to readers what autism is and isn't, what therapies have worked and what hasn’t been effective, and paints a moving, memorable portrait life with her boys.

Review:

"As Moore astutely points out, 'Giving birth to an autistic child doesn't make you an instant expert on the subject.' Moore, a British journalist, doesn't claim to be an expert, but as the mother of George and Sam, two autistic boys (she has a third nonautistic son as well), Moore is able to provide a perceptive look into the habits and, to a certain extent, the minds of her sons. 'A common belief among people not deeply familiar with autism,' she writes, 'is that there is a normal child trapped inside, struggling to get out. That's a false belief.... Sam has no 'normal' core.' Those casually visiting the world of autism might be frustrated by Moore's detached accounting: she merely hints at her own feelings, doesn't discuss her nonautistic son and skims over her split from the boys' father. But for anyone dealing with an autistic loved one, the details are chilling and insightful. Less memoir than road map, the book lays out every aspect of her children's lives, such as their inability to integrate at school, their eating and sleeping habits, their stims ('self-stimulation,' the autistic behavior that can soothe or calm) and the structures of their day. She shies away from nothing. With fact, theory and her own take on matters, Moore's book will reassure others in her position that they are not alone in their struggles." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"But Moore gives readers only half the information they need. She explains the symptoms that nervous parents should look out for, describes what they should do to care for these youngsters. (She stops at puberty.) She tells us what to do; she just doesn't tell us how to do it. For close to 300 pages, she becomes more austere and self-sacrificing, more and more saintly, until by the end — I'm... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"One thing that George and Sam is not is a memoir. Moore's descriptions and discussion of her boys are vivid, deeply touching, wry, and sometimes quite amusing." Philadelphia Inquirer

Review:

"Moore may disappoint some readers with her point that not all approaches work for all children and that our victories are not always clear-cut. But this reviewer found her honesty heartening, and many other parents of autistic children will as well." Library Journal

Review:

"Altogether brave and informative." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

For the parents, families, and friends of the 1 in 250 autistic children born annually in the United States, George and Sam provides a unique look into the life of the autistic child. 

 

Charlotte Moore has three children, George, Sam, and Jake.  George and Sam are autistic.  George and Sam takes the reader from the births of each of the two boys, along the painstaking path to diagnosis, interventions, schooling and more.  She writes powerfully about her family and her sons, and allows readers to see the boys behind the label of autism.  Their often puzzling behavior, unusual food aversions, and the different ways that autism effects George and Sam lend deeper insight into this confounding disorder.

 

George and Sam emerge from her narrative as distinct, wonderful, and at times frustrating children who both are autistic through and through.  Moore does not feel the need to search for cause or cure, but simply to find the best ways to help her sons.  She conveys to readers what autism is and isn't, what therapies have worked and what hasn't been effective, and paints a moving, memorable portrait life with her boys.

 
Charlotte Moore is a writer and journalist who lives in Sussex, England with her three sons. She is the author of four novels and three children's book.  For two years she wrote a highly acclaimed column in the Guardian called "Mind the Gap" about life with George and Sam.  She is a contributor to many publications.

 

Synopsis:

“Brilliant…the first book about autism Ive read that Id recommend to people who wanted to know what it was like.”

            -Nick Hornby, author of About a Boy and A Long Way Down

 

For the parents, families, and friends of the 1 in 250 autistic children born annually in the United States, George and Sam provides a unique look into the life of the autistic child. 

 

Charlotte Moore has three children, George, Sam, and Jake.  George and Sam are autistic.  George and Sam takes the reader from the births of each of the two boys, along the painstaking path to diagnosis, interventions, schooling and more.  She writes powerfully about her family and her sons, and allows readers to see the boys behind the label of autism.  Their often puzzling behavior, unusual food aversions, and the different ways that autism effects George and Sam lend deeper insight into this confounding disorder.

 

George and Sam emerge from her narrative as distinct, wonderful, and at times frustrating children who both are autistic through and through.  Moore does not feel the need to search for cause or cure, but simply to find the best ways to help her sons.  She conveys to readers what autism is and isnt, what therapies have worked and what hasnt been effective, and paints a moving, memorable portrait life with her boys.

 

Charlotte Moore is a writer and journalist who lives in Sussex, England with her three sons. She is the author of four novels and three children's book.  For two years she wrote a highly acclaimed column in the Guardian called “Mind the Gap” about life with George and Sam.  She is a contributor to many publications.

 

 

About the Author

Charlotte Moore is a writer and journalist who lives in Sussex, England with her three sons. She is the author of four novels and three children's book. For two years she wrote a highly acclaimed column in the Guardian called "Mind the Gap" about life with George and Sam. She is a contributor to many publications.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312358938
Subtitle:
Two Boys, One Family, and Autism
Author:
Moore, Charlotte
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Subject:
Children with Special Needs
Subject:
Pediatrics
Subject:
Specific Groups - Special Needs
Subject:
Autistic children
Subject:
Autism in children
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
BIO026000
Subject:
Autism Spectrum Disorders
Subject:
People with disabilities
Copyright:
Edition Description:
St Martin's Pre
Publication Date:
20061128
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Plus one 8-page bandw photo insert
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.625 x 1 in

Other books you might like

  1. The Places In Between
    Used Trade Paper $3.95
  2. Strange Piece of Paradise Used Trade Paper $7.50

Related Subjects

Biography » General
Health and Self-Help » Child Psychology » Autism
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Autism

George and Sam: Two Boys, One Family, and Autism Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$17.50 In Stock
Product details 320 pages St. Martin's Press - English 9780312358938 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "As Moore astutely points out, 'Giving birth to an autistic child doesn't make you an instant expert on the subject.' Moore, a British journalist, doesn't claim to be an expert, but as the mother of George and Sam, two autistic boys (she has a third nonautistic son as well), Moore is able to provide a perceptive look into the habits and, to a certain extent, the minds of her sons. 'A common belief among people not deeply familiar with autism,' she writes, 'is that there is a normal child trapped inside, struggling to get out. That's a false belief.... Sam has no 'normal' core.' Those casually visiting the world of autism might be frustrated by Moore's detached accounting: she merely hints at her own feelings, doesn't discuss her nonautistic son and skims over her split from the boys' father. But for anyone dealing with an autistic loved one, the details are chilling and insightful. Less memoir than road map, the book lays out every aspect of her children's lives, such as their inability to integrate at school, their eating and sleeping habits, their stims ('self-stimulation,' the autistic behavior that can soothe or calm) and the structures of their day. She shies away from nothing. With fact, theory and her own take on matters, Moore's book will reassure others in her position that they are not alone in their struggles." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "One thing that George and Sam is not is a memoir. Moore's descriptions and discussion of her boys are vivid, deeply touching, wry, and sometimes quite amusing."
"Review" by , "Moore may disappoint some readers with her point that not all approaches work for all children and that our victories are not always clear-cut. But this reviewer found her honesty heartening, and many other parents of autistic children will as well."
"Review" by , "Altogether brave and informative."
"Synopsis" by ,
For the parents, families, and friends of the 1 in 250 autistic children born annually in the United States, George and Sam provides a unique look into the life of the autistic child. 

 

Charlotte Moore has three children, George, Sam, and Jake.  George and Sam are autistic.  George and Sam takes the reader from the births of each of the two boys, along the painstaking path to diagnosis, interventions, schooling and more.  She writes powerfully about her family and her sons, and allows readers to see the boys behind the label of autism.  Their often puzzling behavior, unusual food aversions, and the different ways that autism effects George and Sam lend deeper insight into this confounding disorder.

 

George and Sam emerge from her narrative as distinct, wonderful, and at times frustrating children who both are autistic through and through.  Moore does not feel the need to search for cause or cure, but simply to find the best ways to help her sons.  She conveys to readers what autism is and isn't, what therapies have worked and what hasn't been effective, and paints a moving, memorable portrait life with her boys.

 
Charlotte Moore is a writer and journalist who lives in Sussex, England with her three sons. She is the author of four novels and three children's book.  For two years she wrote a highly acclaimed column in the Guardian called "Mind the Gap" about life with George and Sam.  She is a contributor to many publications.

 

"Synopsis" by ,

“Brilliant…the first book about autism Ive read that Id recommend to people who wanted to know what it was like.”

            -Nick Hornby, author of About a Boy and A Long Way Down

 

For the parents, families, and friends of the 1 in 250 autistic children born annually in the United States, George and Sam provides a unique look into the life of the autistic child. 

 

Charlotte Moore has three children, George, Sam, and Jake.  George and Sam are autistic.  George and Sam takes the reader from the births of each of the two boys, along the painstaking path to diagnosis, interventions, schooling and more.  She writes powerfully about her family and her sons, and allows readers to see the boys behind the label of autism.  Their often puzzling behavior, unusual food aversions, and the different ways that autism effects George and Sam lend deeper insight into this confounding disorder.

 

George and Sam emerge from her narrative as distinct, wonderful, and at times frustrating children who both are autistic through and through.  Moore does not feel the need to search for cause or cure, but simply to find the best ways to help her sons.  She conveys to readers what autism is and isnt, what therapies have worked and what hasnt been effective, and paints a moving, memorable portrait life with her boys.

 

Charlotte Moore is a writer and journalist who lives in Sussex, England with her three sons. She is the author of four novels and three children's book.  For two years she wrote a highly acclaimed column in the Guardian called “Mind the Gap” about life with George and Sam.  She is a contributor to many publications.

 

 

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.