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1 Local Warehouse American Studies- 50s, 60s, and 70s

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Mad Women: The Other Side of Life on Madison Avenue in the '60s and Beyond

by

Mad Women: The Other Side of Life on Madison Avenue in the '60s and Beyond Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"Breezy and salty.” -The New York Times

“Hilarious! Honest, intimate, this book tells it as it was.” -Mary Wells Lawrence, author of A Big Life (In Advertising) and founding president of Wells Rich Greene

“Breezy and engaging [though] …The chief value of Mad Women is the witness it bears for younger women about the snobbery and sexism their mothers and grandmothers endured as the price of entry into mid-century American professional life.” -The Boston Globe

“A real-life Peggy Olson, right out of Mad Men.”  -Shelly Lazarus, Chairman, Ogilvy & Mather

What was it like to be an advertising woman on Madison Avenue in the 60s and 70s - that Mad Men era of casual sex and professional serfdom? A real-life Peggy Olson reveals it all in this immensely entertaining and bittersweet memoir.

Mad Women is a tell-all account of life in the New York advertising world by Jane Maas, a copywriter who succeeded in the primarily male jungle depicted in the hit show Mad Men.  

Fans of the show are dying to know how accurate it is: was there really that much sex at the office? Were there really three-martini lunches? Were women really second-class citizens? Jane Maas says the answer to all three questions is unequivocally “yes.” Her book, based on her own experiences and countless interviews with her peers, gives the full stories, from the junior account man whose wife almost left him when she found the copy of Screw magazine hed used to find “a date” for a client, to the Ogilvy & Mathers annual Boat Ride, a sex-and-booze filled orgy, from which it was said no virgin ever returned intact. Wickedly funny and full of juicy inside information, Mad Women also tackles some of the tougher issues of the era, such as unequal pay, rampant, jaw-dropping sexism, and the difficult choice many women faced between motherhood and their careers.

Review:

"Maas's humorous yet authoritative account of her life in advertising during the Mad Men era is a welcome look behind the curtain into a traditionally male world. Often asked if the popular show accurately depicts women's second-class standing (and the copious amounts of office sex and drinking) in the 1960s, Maas (Adventures of an Advertising Woman) says yes and no. Hired as a copywriter at Ogilvy & Mather in 1964, she rose to creative director before leaving in 1976, later working at some of Manhattan's top ad agencies. Maas takes readers through a typical office day before addressing questions of sex (yes, ad execs slept around, she realizes now), alcohol (it was customary to have a drink before, during, and after lunch), and thornier issues of balancing career demands with motherhood in a time when being a housewife was still the norm. Some of her most interesting insights come from the advertising campaigns themselves, from a failed Shake 'n Bake follow-up (Batter Fry, anyone?) to the phenomenal success of the Maas-driven 'I Love New York' campaign. Sexual harassment in the work place — especially the unsubtle advances of a particular boss Maas describes — might seem foreign, but as she points out, no human resources department existed and 'sexual harassment' hadn't entered the lexicon yet. Maas mixes personal stories with advertising history, making this a compelling read. Agent, Lynn Nesbit." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Fans of the show Mad Men are dying to know how accurate it is. Was there really that much sex at the office? Were there really three-martini lunches? Were women really second-class citizens? Jane Maas says the answer to all three questions is unequivocally "yes." Her book Mad Women, based on her own experiences and countless interviews with her peers, is a fascinating tell-all account of life as an ad woman in the male jungle of Madison Avenue.

Synopsis:

"Breezy and salty.” -The New York Times

“Hilarious! Honest, intimate, this book tells it as it was.” -Mary Wells Lawrence, author of A Big Life (In Advertising) and founding president of Wells Rich Greene

“Breezy and engaging [though] …The chief value of Mad Women is the witness it bears for younger women about the snobbery and sexism their mothers and grandmothers endured as the price of entry into mid-century American professional life.” -The Boston Globe

“A real-life Peggy Olson, right out of Mad Men.”  -Shelly Lazarus, Chairman, Ogilvy & Mather

What was it like to be an advertising woman on Madison Avenue in the 60s and 70s - that Mad Men era of casual sex and professional serfdom? A real-life Peggy Olson reveals it all in this immensely entertaining and bittersweet memoir.

Mad Women is a tell-all account of life in the New York advertising world by Jane Maas, a copywriter who succeeded in the primarily male jungle depicted in the hit show Mad Men.  

Fans of the show are dying to know how accurate it is: was there really that much sex at the office? Were there really three-martini lunches? Were women really second-class citizens? Jane Maas says the answer to all three questions is unequivocally “yes.” Her book, based on her own experiences and countless interviews with her peers, gives the full stories, from the junior account man whose wife almost left him when she found the copy of Screw magazine hed used to find “a date” for a client, to the Ogilvy & Mathers annual Boat Ride, a sex-and-booze filled orgy, from which it was said no virgin ever returned intact. Wickedly funny and full of juicy inside information, Mad Women also tackles some of the tougher issues of the era, such as unequal pay, rampant, jaw-dropping sexism, and the difficult choice many women faced between motherhood and their careers.

About the Author

JANE MAAS began her career at Ogilvy & Mather as a copywriter in 1964 and rose to become a creative director and agency officer. Ultimately, she became president of a New York agency. A Matrix Award winner and an Advertising Woman of the Year, she is best known for her direction of the “I Love New York” campaign. She is the author of Adventures of an Advertising Woman and co-author of the classic How to Advertise, which has been translated into seventeen languages.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312640231
Subtitle:
The Other Side of Life on Madison Avenue in the '60s and Beyond
Author:
Maas, Jane
Publisher:
St. Martin's Griffin
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Historical
Subject:
Business
Subject:
General
Subject:
Biography/Business
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20130129
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Includes 6 black-and-white photographs t
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in

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Related Subjects

Biography » Business
Biography » Historical
Biography » Women
Business » Advertising
History and Social Science » American Studies » 50s, 60s, and 70s

Mad Women: The Other Side of Life on Madison Avenue in the '60s and Beyond Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.95 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Thomas Dunne Books - English 9780312640231 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Maas's humorous yet authoritative account of her life in advertising during the Mad Men era is a welcome look behind the curtain into a traditionally male world. Often asked if the popular show accurately depicts women's second-class standing (and the copious amounts of office sex and drinking) in the 1960s, Maas (Adventures of an Advertising Woman) says yes and no. Hired as a copywriter at Ogilvy & Mather in 1964, she rose to creative director before leaving in 1976, later working at some of Manhattan's top ad agencies. Maas takes readers through a typical office day before addressing questions of sex (yes, ad execs slept around, she realizes now), alcohol (it was customary to have a drink before, during, and after lunch), and thornier issues of balancing career demands with motherhood in a time when being a housewife was still the norm. Some of her most interesting insights come from the advertising campaigns themselves, from a failed Shake 'n Bake follow-up (Batter Fry, anyone?) to the phenomenal success of the Maas-driven 'I Love New York' campaign. Sexual harassment in the work place — especially the unsubtle advances of a particular boss Maas describes — might seem foreign, but as she points out, no human resources department existed and 'sexual harassment' hadn't entered the lexicon yet. Maas mixes personal stories with advertising history, making this a compelling read. Agent, Lynn Nesbit." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,

Fans of the show Mad Men are dying to know how accurate it is. Was there really that much sex at the office? Were there really three-martini lunches? Were women really second-class citizens? Jane Maas says the answer to all three questions is unequivocally "yes." Her book Mad Women, based on her own experiences and countless interviews with her peers, is a fascinating tell-all account of life as an ad woman in the male jungle of Madison Avenue.

"Synopsis" by ,

"Breezy and salty.” -The New York Times

“Hilarious! Honest, intimate, this book tells it as it was.” -Mary Wells Lawrence, author of A Big Life (In Advertising) and founding president of Wells Rich Greene

“Breezy and engaging [though] …The chief value of Mad Women is the witness it bears for younger women about the snobbery and sexism their mothers and grandmothers endured as the price of entry into mid-century American professional life.” -The Boston Globe

“A real-life Peggy Olson, right out of Mad Men.”  -Shelly Lazarus, Chairman, Ogilvy & Mather

What was it like to be an advertising woman on Madison Avenue in the 60s and 70s - that Mad Men era of casual sex and professional serfdom? A real-life Peggy Olson reveals it all in this immensely entertaining and bittersweet memoir.

Mad Women is a tell-all account of life in the New York advertising world by Jane Maas, a copywriter who succeeded in the primarily male jungle depicted in the hit show Mad Men.  

Fans of the show are dying to know how accurate it is: was there really that much sex at the office? Were there really three-martini lunches? Were women really second-class citizens? Jane Maas says the answer to all three questions is unequivocally “yes.” Her book, based on her own experiences and countless interviews with her peers, gives the full stories, from the junior account man whose wife almost left him when she found the copy of Screw magazine hed used to find “a date” for a client, to the Ogilvy & Mathers annual Boat Ride, a sex-and-booze filled orgy, from which it was said no virgin ever returned intact. Wickedly funny and full of juicy inside information, Mad Women also tackles some of the tougher issues of the era, such as unequal pay, rampant, jaw-dropping sexism, and the difficult choice many women faced between motherhood and their careers.

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