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Just Enough Liebling

Just Enough Liebling Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The restaurants of the Latin Quarter and the city rooms of midtown Manhattan; the beachhead of Normandy and the boxing gyms of Times Square; the trackside haunts of bookmakers and the shadowy redoubts of Southern politicians--these are the places that A.J. Liebling shows to us in his unforgettable New Yorker articles, brought together here so that a new generation of readers might discover Liebling as if for the first time.

Born a hundred years ago, Abbott Joseph "Joe" Liebling was the first of the great New Yorker writers, a colorful and tireless figure who helped set the magazine's urbane style. Today, he is best known as a celebrant of the "sweet science" of boxing or as a "feeder" who ravishes the reader with his descriptions of food and wine. But as David Remnick, a Liebling devotee, suggests in his fond and insightful introduction, Liebling was a writer bounded only by his intelligence, taste, and ardor for life. Like his nemesis William Randolph Hearst, he changed the rules of modern journalism, banishing the distinctions between reporting and storytelling, between news and art. Whatever his role, Liebling is a most companionable figure, and to read the pieces in this grand and generous book is to be swept along on a thrilling adventure in a world of confidence men, rogues, press barons and political cronies, with an inimitable writer as one's guide.

Review:

"As one of the first top New Yorker writers in the 1930s and beyond, Liebling helped set the magazine's sophisticated, urbane tone, and his essays are crackling enough to remain unique decades later. The writer took on a range of subjects, from the earthy to the urbane, and blurred the line between reportage and essay writing. Remnick isolates the qualities that made Liebling a powerful force in the magazine's early years, noting that his work was almost invariably vibrant, no matter the topic. Heady words, considering the breadth of subjects in this volume; Liebling's discourses are stuffed with the observations of a savvy globetrotter. Even as a child, he created a 'small personal Olympus' that included George Washington, Lillian Russell and Enrico Caruso, and he explains the quirks that landed each in his affections. As an adult, Liebling was fond of food, preferably foreign, and boxing, especially bare knuckled. Also included is considerable WWII reporting, blending description with minor detail. Throughout, Liebling's style is zesty, lifting readers up with erudition, but keeping them grounded: 'In the light of what Proust wrote with so mild a stimulus, it is the world's loss that he did not have a heartier appetite.' Fans of gourmand and bon vivant Liebling won't have the same complaint. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Liebling, it's now apparent, is not just one of the great American reporters but one of the great American writers....There can never be enough Liebling around but Just Enough Liebling is a wonderful start, and a necessary purchase for anyone who cares about American style." Adam Gopnik, author of Paris to the Moon

Review:

"All great city reporting begins in the general vicinity of the little desks that pack Liebling's Jollity Building, and, now that I've revisited all those airless offices and always-manned phonebooths yet again, it probably ends there too." Robert Sullivan, author of Rats

Review:

"The only thing wrong with this book is its title: No amount of Liebling is ever enough. He had a raptor's eye, a virtuoso's ear, and an enormous heart. He was wildly funny and frequently profound, and he may well have been the greatest American prose stylist of the twentieth century. " Luc Sante, author of Low Life

Review:

"[A] useful window on Liebling's vast body of writing and a reminder, to those lucky enough to have read him the first time around, of why he was so beloved." Charles McGrath, The New York Times Book Review

Synopsis:

To read these pieces by one of the first great New Yorker writers is to be swept along on a thrilling adventure in a world of confident men, rogues, press barons and political cronies, with an inimitable writer as one's guide.

Synopsis:

Abbott Joseph Liebling was one of the greatest of all New Yorker writers, a colorful figure who helped set the magazine's urbane tone and style. Just Enough Liebling gathers in one volume the vividest and most enjoyable of his pieces. Charles McGrath (in The New York Times Book Review) praised it as "a judicious sampling-a useful window on Liebling's vast body of writing and a reminder, to those lucky enough to have read him the first time around, of why he was so beloved." Today Liebling is best known as a celebrant of the "sweet science" of boxing, and as a "feeder" who ravishes the reader with his descriptions of food and wine. But as David Remnick observes in his fond and insightful introduction, Liebling is "boundlessly curious, a listener, a boulevardier, a man of appetites and sympathy"-and a writer who, with his great friend and colleague Joseph Mitchell, deftly traversed the boundaries between reporting and storytelling, between news and art.

About the Author

A. J. Liebling joined the staff of The New Yorker in 1935 and wrote for the magazine until his death in 1963. David Remnick is the editor of The New Yorker.

Table of Contents

Introduction by David Remnick

At Table in Paris

A Good Appetite

Paris the First

Just Enough Money

The War and After

Letter from Paris, December 22, 1939

Letter from Paris, June 1, 1940

Westbound Tanker

The Foamy Fields

Quest for Mollie

Days with the Daydaybay

The Hounds with Sad Voices

City Life

The Jollity Building

from The Honest Rainmaker

Boxiana

Sugar Ray and the Milling Cove

Ahab and Nemesis

The University of Eighth Avenue

Poet and Pedagogue

The Press

The World of Sport

My Name in Big Letters

Obits

The Man Who Changed the Rules

Death on the One Hand

Harold Ross--The Impresario

The Earl of Louisiana

"Joe Sims, Where the Hell?"

Nothing but a Little Pissant

Blam-Blam-Blam

Epilogue

Paysage de Crépuscule

Product Details

ISBN:
9780374104436
Subtitle:
Classic Work by the Legendary New Yorker Writer
Introduction:
Remnick, David
Introduction:
Remnick, David
Author:
Liebling, A. J.
Author:
Remnick, David
Publisher:
North Point Press
Subject:
General
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
American - General
Edition Description:
First
Publication Date:
20051005
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
560
Dimensions:
8.24 x 5.4 x 1.56 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Journalism » Journalists

Just Enough Liebling
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 560 pages Farrar Straus Giroux - English 9780374104436 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "As one of the first top New Yorker writers in the 1930s and beyond, Liebling helped set the magazine's sophisticated, urbane tone, and his essays are crackling enough to remain unique decades later. The writer took on a range of subjects, from the earthy to the urbane, and blurred the line between reportage and essay writing. Remnick isolates the qualities that made Liebling a powerful force in the magazine's early years, noting that his work was almost invariably vibrant, no matter the topic. Heady words, considering the breadth of subjects in this volume; Liebling's discourses are stuffed with the observations of a savvy globetrotter. Even as a child, he created a 'small personal Olympus' that included George Washington, Lillian Russell and Enrico Caruso, and he explains the quirks that landed each in his affections. As an adult, Liebling was fond of food, preferably foreign, and boxing, especially bare knuckled. Also included is considerable WWII reporting, blending description with minor detail. Throughout, Liebling's style is zesty, lifting readers up with erudition, but keeping them grounded: 'In the light of what Proust wrote with so mild a stimulus, it is the world's loss that he did not have a heartier appetite.' Fans of gourmand and bon vivant Liebling won't have the same complaint. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Liebling, it's now apparent, is not just one of the great American reporters but one of the great American writers....There can never be enough Liebling around but Just Enough Liebling is a wonderful start, and a necessary purchase for anyone who cares about American style."
"Review" by , "All great city reporting begins in the general vicinity of the little desks that pack Liebling's Jollity Building, and, now that I've revisited all those airless offices and always-manned phonebooths yet again, it probably ends there too."
"Review" by , "The only thing wrong with this book is its title: No amount of Liebling is ever enough. He had a raptor's eye, a virtuoso's ear, and an enormous heart. He was wildly funny and frequently profound, and he may well have been the greatest American prose stylist of the twentieth century. "
"Review" by , "[A] useful window on Liebling's vast body of writing and a reminder, to those lucky enough to have read him the first time around, of why he was so beloved."
"Synopsis" by , To read these pieces by one of the first great New Yorker writers is to be swept along on a thrilling adventure in a world of confident men, rogues, press barons and political cronies, with an inimitable writer as one's guide.
"Synopsis" by ,
Abbott Joseph Liebling was one of the greatest of all New Yorker writers, a colorful figure who helped set the magazine's urbane tone and style. Just Enough Liebling gathers in one volume the vividest and most enjoyable of his pieces. Charles McGrath (in The New York Times Book Review) praised it as "a judicious sampling-a useful window on Liebling's vast body of writing and a reminder, to those lucky enough to have read him the first time around, of why he was so beloved." Today Liebling is best known as a celebrant of the "sweet science" of boxing, and as a "feeder" who ravishes the reader with his descriptions of food and wine. But as David Remnick observes in his fond and insightful introduction, Liebling is "boundlessly curious, a listener, a boulevardier, a man of appetites and sympathy"-and a writer who, with his great friend and colleague Joseph Mitchell, deftly traversed the boundaries between reporting and storytelling, between news and art.

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