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1 Beaverton Art- History and Criticism

de Kooning's Bicycle: Artists and Writers in the Hamptons

by

de Kooning's Bicycle: Artists and Writers in the Hamptons Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Some of the twentieth century's most important artists and writers--from Jackson Pollock to Saul Steinberg, Frank O'Hara to Jean Stafford--lived and worked on the East End of Long Island years before it assumed an alternate identity as the Hamptons. The home they made there, and its effect on their work, is the subject of these searching, lyrical vignettes by the critic and poet Robert Long.

Pollock moved to Springs because he thought he wanted to stop drinking, but he found a connection to nature there that inspired some of the most significant paintings of our time. Others followed him. When Fairfield Porter bought a house in Southampton, the New York School suddenly had a new headquarters, and James Schuyler and Frank O'Hara found companionship and raw material for their poems on South Main Street and on the three-hour train ride between the city and the East End. Willem de Kooning rode his bike every day between his studio in the East Hampton woods and the bay, where the light informed every brushstroke he put to canvas from the early 1960s on.

In De Kooning's Bicycle, Long mixes storytelling with history to re-create the lives and events that shaped American art and literature as we know it today, in a landscape where town met country and the modern met America's rural past.

Robert Long is the editor of Long Island Poets and a contributor to The New Yorker and The Partisan Review, among other publications. He lives in East Hampton, New York.
Some of the twentieth century's most important artists and writersfrom Jackson Pollock to Saul Steinberg, Frank O'Hara to Jean Staffordlived and worked on the East End of Long Island. The home they made there, and its effect on their work, is the subject of these searching, lyrical vignettes by the critic and poet Robert Long.

Pollock moved to Springs because he thought he wanted to stop drinking, but he found a connection to nature there that inspired some of the most significant paintings of our time. Others followed him. When Fairfield Porter bought a house in Southampton, the New York School suddenly had a new headquarters, and James Schuyler and Frank O'Hara found companionship and raw material for their poems on South Main Street and on the three-hour train ride between the city and the East End. Willem de Kooning rode his bike every day between his studio in the East Hampton woods and the bay, where the light informed every brushstroke he put to canvas from the early 1960s on.

In De Kooning's Bicycle, Long mixes storytelling with history to re-create the lives and events that shaped American art and literature as we know it today, in a landscape where town met country and the modern met America's rural past.

"You must read these beautifully written and sensitive portraits of several of the major figures in the arts who inhabited the east end of Long Island during its great creative periodde Kooning, Pollock, Krasner, Jean Stafford, Saul Steinberg, and others. Those of us who knew these extraordinary people are grateful to have our memories sharpened; those who are meeting them for the first time here have the thrill of discovery ahead of them. This is an invaluable book."Edward Albee
 
"Before Hollywood invaded the Hamptons and McMansions replaced potato fields, the region played a vital role in the history of mid-twentieth-century American art. Poet and Hamptons native Robert Long tells this engrossing story with a novelist's flair."John Ashbery
 
"If, as de Kooning said, art is a big soup, Robert Long has given us the goggles to plumb for the most delectable bits. Long's memoir ranks with the cultural criticism of Shattuck's Banquet Years: his eye for beauty, masterful style, and historical sense make this a shining gift to the world."Mary Karr, author of Cherry
 
"De Kooning's Bicycle is a beautiful, heartbreaking book and an astonishing act of clairvoyance. Robert Long enters the minds of the brilliant deadPollock, de Kooning, O'Haraand looks through their eyes, infused with the sweetness and melancholy of the East End landscape and its marine light. The book's poetry and emotional precision ensure that it will be not just read but reread."Luc Sante, author of Low Life
 
"New York City's influence on American art and literature is a given. Less well known is the effect of bucolic Long Island. Long, the art critic for the East Hampton Star, offers a vivid history of the Hamptons as a sea-caressed mecca for Manhattan-based painters and writers, a bohemian group who flocked to the shore each summer, beginning in the Gilded Age with William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam. But Long soon wearies of factual reporting and chooses to slip into imaginary inner monologues instead, writing in the voices of Long Island's most notorious artist outlaw, Jackson Pollock; one of the island's most enduring denizens, Willem de Kooning; Fairfield Porter, who lived there with his wife and his lover, James Schuyler; as well as Frank O'Hara, Jean Stafford, and Saul Steinberg. Long's empathic projections are certainly mesmerizing and moving."Donna Seaman, Booklist
 
"In a series of vividly told vignettes, critic and poet Long illustrates how the East End of Long Island indelibly etched a mark on the style and work processes of the abstract impressionists and their artistically minded friends. For artists like Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning and their respective wives, Lee Krasner and Elaine, the Hamptons were a creative playground in the 1950s. Long reimagines their lives there in stories told from the artists' points of view. Pollock, aka Jack the Dripper, and Krasner moved to the East End in 1945 in an attempt to curb the infamous inebriate's drinking and stimulate his talent, and Long cleverly narrates Pollock's artistic methods. When the artist 'unleashed screaming ribbons of cadmium yellow, it was like a hot trumpet solo,' Long writes, likening his painting process to jazz improvisations. Former MoMA curator Frank O'Hara, Fairfield Porter, Jean Stafford and New Yorker cartoonist Saul Steinberg receive similarly poetic treatment, but it's with titans like Pollock and de Kooning that Long best captures the spirit of modernism as filtered through New York's rural past."Publishers Weekly

Review:

"In a series of vividly told vignettes, critic and poet Long (Blue) illustrates how the East End of Long Island indelibly etched a mark on the style and work processes of the abstract impressionists and their artistically minded friends. For artists like Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning and their respective wives, Lee Krasner and Elaine, the Hamptons were a creative playground in the 1950s. Long reimagines their lives there in stories told from the artists' points of view. Pollock, aka Jack the Dripper, and Krasner moved to the East End in 1945 in an attempt to curb the infamous inebriate's drinking and stimulate his talent, and Long cleverly narrates Pollock's artistic methods. When the artist 'unleashed screaming ribbons of cadmium yellow, it was like a hot trumpet solo,' Long writes, likening his painting process to jazz improvisations. Former MoMA curator Frank O'Hara, Fairfield Porter, Jean Stafford and New Yorker cartoonist Saul Steinberg receive similarly poetic treatment, but it's with titans like Pollock and de Kooning that Long best captures the spirit of modernism as filtered through New York's rural past. Agent, Patricia Van der Leun." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Some of the 20th century's most important artists and writers lived and worked on the east end of Long Island years before it assumed its alternate identity as the Hamptons. The homes they made there, and the effect on their work, is the subject of these searching, lyrical vignettes.

Synopsis:

Some of the twentieth century's most important artists and writers--from Jackson Pollock to Saul Steinberg, Frank O'Hara to Jean Stafford--lived and worked on the East End of Long Island years before it assumed an alternate identity as the Hamptons. The home they made there, and its effect on their work, is the subject of these searching, lyrical vignettes by the critic and poet Robert Long.

Pollock moved to Springs because he thought he wanted to stop drinking, but he found a connection to nature there that inspired some of the most significant paintings of our time. Others followed him. When Fairfield Porter bought a house in Southampton, the New York School suddenly had a new headquarters, and James Schuyler and Frank O'Hara found companionship and raw material for their poems on South Main Street and on the three-hour train ride between the city and the East End. Willem de Kooning rode his bike every day between his studio in the East Hampton woods and the bay, where the light informed every brushstroke he put to canvas from the early 1960s on.

In De Kooning's Bicycle, Long mixes storytelling with history to re-create the lives and events that shaped American art and literature as we know it today, in a landscape where town met country and the modern met America's rural past.

Synopsis:

Some of the twentieth century's most important artists and writers--from Jackson Pollock to Saul Steinberg, Frank O'Hara to Jean Stafford--lived and worked on the East End of Long Island years before it assumed an alternate identity as the Hamptons. The home they made there, and its effect on their work, is the subject of these searching, lyrical vignettes by the critic and poet Robert Long.

Pollock moved to Springs because he thought he wanted to stop drinking, but he found a connection to nature there that inspired some of the most significant paintings of our time. Others followed him. When Fairfield Porter bought a house in Southampton, the New York School suddenly had a new headquarters, and James Schuyler and Frank O'Hara found companionship and raw material for their poems on South Main Street and on the three-hour train ride between the city and the East End. Willem de Kooning rode his bike every day between his studio in the East Hampton woods and the bay, where the light informed every brushstroke he put to canvas from the early 1960s on.

In De Kooning's Bicycle, Long mixes storytelling with history to re-create the lives and events that shaped American art and literature as we know it today, in a landscape where town met country and the modern met America's rural past.

Robert Long is the editor of Long Island Poets and a contributor to The New Yorker and The Partisan Review, among other publications. He lives in East Hampton, New York. Some of the twentieth century's most important artists and writers--from Jackson Pollock to Saul Steinberg, Frank O'Hara to Jean Stafford--lived and worked on the East End of Long Island. The home they made there, and its effect on their work, is the subject of these searching, lyrical vignettes by the critic and poet Robert Long.

Pollock moved to Springs because he thought he wanted to stop drinking, but he found a connection to nature there that inspired some of the most significant paintings of our time. Others followed him. When Fairfield Porter bought a house in Southampton, the New York School suddenly had a new headquarters, and James Schuyler and Frank O'Hara found companionship and raw material for their poems on South Main Street and on the three-hour train ride between the city and the East End. Willem de Kooning rode his bike every day between his studio in the East Hampton woods and the bay, where the light informed every brushstroke he put to canvas from the early 1960s on.

In De Kooning's Bicycle, Long mixes storytelling with history to re-create the lives and events that shaped American art and literature as we know it today, in a landscape where town met country and the modern met America's rural past. You must read these beautifully written and sensitive portraits of several of the major figures in the arts who inhabited the east end of Long Island during its great creative period--de Kooning, Pollock, Krasner, Jean Stafford, Saul Steinberg, and others. Those of us who knew these extraordinary people are grateful to have our memories sharpened; those who are meeting them for the first time here have the thrill of discovery ahead of them. This is an invaluable book.--Edward Albee Before Hollywood invaded the Hamptons and McMansions replaced potato fields, the region played a vital role in the history of mid-twentieth-century American art. Poet and Hamptons native Robert Long tells this engrossing story with a novelist's flair.--John Ashbery If, as de Kooning said, art is a big soup, Robert Long has given us the goggles to plumb for the most delectable bits. Long's memoir ranks with the cultural criticism of Shattuck's Banquet Years: his eye for beauty, masterful style, and historical sense make this a shining gift to the world.--Mary Karr, author of Cherry De Kooning's Bicycle is a beautiful, heartbreaking book and an astonishing act of clairvoyance. Robert Long enters the minds of the brilliant dead--Pollock, de Kooning, O'Hara--and looks through their eyes, infused with the sweetness and melancholy of the East End landscape and its marine light. The book's poetry and emotional precision ensure that it will be not just read but reread.--Luc Sante, author of Low Life New York City's influence on American art and literature is a given. Less well known is the effect of bucolic Long Island. Long, the art critic for the East Hampton Star, offers a vivid history of the Hamptons as a sea-caressed mecca for Manhattan-based painters and writers, a bohemian group who flocked to the shore each summer, beginning in the Gilded Age with William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam. But Long soon wearies of factual reporting and chooses to slip into imaginary inner monologues instead, writing in the voices of Long Island's most notorious artist outlaw, Jackson Pollock; one of the island's most enduring denizens, Willem de Kooning; Fairfield Porter, who lived there with his wife and his lover, James Schuyler; as well as Frank O'Hara, Jean Stafford, and Saul Steinberg. Long's empathic projections are certainly mesmerizing and moving.--Donna Seaman, Booklist In a series of vividly told vignettes, critic and poet Long illustrates how the East End of Long Island indelibly etched a mark on the style and work processes of the abstract impressionists and their artistically minded friends. For artists like Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning and their respective wives, Lee Krasner and Elaine, the Hamptons were a creative playground in the 1950s. Long reimagines their lives there in stories told from the artists' points of view. Pollock, aka Jack the Dripper, and Krasner moved to the East End in 1945 in an attempt to curb the infamous inebriate's drinking and stimulate his talent, and Long cleverly narrates Pollock's artistic methods. When the artist 'unleashed screaming ribbons of cadmium yellow, it was like a hot trumpet solo, ' Long writes, likening his painting process to jazz improvisations. Former MoMA curator Frank O'Hara, Fairfield Porter, Jean Stafford and New Yorker cartoonist Saul Steinberg receive similarly poetic treatment, but it's with titans like Pollock and de Kooning that Long best captures the spirit of modernism as filtered through New York's rural past.--Publishers Weekly

About the Author

Robert Long is the editor of Long Island Poets and a contributor to The New Yorker and The Partisan Review, among other publications. He lives in East Hampton, New York.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780374165383
Subtitle:
Artists and Writers in the Hamptons
Author:
Long, Robert
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Subject:
General
Subject:
History - General
Subject:
American - General
Subject:
19th century
Subject:
Arts, American
Subject:
History - Modern (Late 19th Century to 1945)
Subject:
American
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20051116
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
24 Illustrations
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8.72 x 5.76 x 0.9 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » History and Criticism
Arts and Entertainment » Art » New York
History and Social Science » Literary History » United States » 20th Century
History and Social Science » Literary History » United States » General

de Kooning's Bicycle: Artists and Writers in the Hamptons Used Hardcover
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Product details 224 pages Farrar Straus Giroux - English 9780374165383 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In a series of vividly told vignettes, critic and poet Long (Blue) illustrates how the East End of Long Island indelibly etched a mark on the style and work processes of the abstract impressionists and their artistically minded friends. For artists like Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning and their respective wives, Lee Krasner and Elaine, the Hamptons were a creative playground in the 1950s. Long reimagines their lives there in stories told from the artists' points of view. Pollock, aka Jack the Dripper, and Krasner moved to the East End in 1945 in an attempt to curb the infamous inebriate's drinking and stimulate his talent, and Long cleverly narrates Pollock's artistic methods. When the artist 'unleashed screaming ribbons of cadmium yellow, it was like a hot trumpet solo,' Long writes, likening his painting process to jazz improvisations. Former MoMA curator Frank O'Hara, Fairfield Porter, Jean Stafford and New Yorker cartoonist Saul Steinberg receive similarly poetic treatment, but it's with titans like Pollock and de Kooning that Long best captures the spirit of modernism as filtered through New York's rural past. Agent, Patricia Van der Leun." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Some of the 20th century's most important artists and writers lived and worked on the east end of Long Island years before it assumed its alternate identity as the Hamptons. The homes they made there, and the effect on their work, is the subject of these searching, lyrical vignettes.
"Synopsis" by ,
Some of the twentieth century's most important artists and writers--from Jackson Pollock to Saul Steinberg, Frank O'Hara to Jean Stafford--lived and worked on the East End of Long Island years before it assumed an alternate identity as the Hamptons. The home they made there, and its effect on their work, is the subject of these searching, lyrical vignettes by the critic and poet Robert Long.

Pollock moved to Springs because he thought he wanted to stop drinking, but he found a connection to nature there that inspired some of the most significant paintings of our time. Others followed him. When Fairfield Porter bought a house in Southampton, the New York School suddenly had a new headquarters, and James Schuyler and Frank O'Hara found companionship and raw material for their poems on South Main Street and on the three-hour train ride between the city and the East End. Willem de Kooning rode his bike every day between his studio in the East Hampton woods and the bay, where the light informed every brushstroke he put to canvas from the early 1960s on.

In De Kooning's Bicycle, Long mixes storytelling with history to re-create the lives and events that shaped American art and literature as we know it today, in a landscape where town met country and the modern met America's rural past.

"Synopsis" by , Some of the twentieth century's most important artists and writers--from Jackson Pollock to Saul Steinberg, Frank O'Hara to Jean Stafford--lived and worked on the East End of Long Island years before it assumed an alternate identity as the Hamptons. The home they made there, and its effect on their work, is the subject of these searching, lyrical vignettes by the critic and poet Robert Long.

Pollock moved to Springs because he thought he wanted to stop drinking, but he found a connection to nature there that inspired some of the most significant paintings of our time. Others followed him. When Fairfield Porter bought a house in Southampton, the New York School suddenly had a new headquarters, and James Schuyler and Frank O'Hara found companionship and raw material for their poems on South Main Street and on the three-hour train ride between the city and the East End. Willem de Kooning rode his bike every day between his studio in the East Hampton woods and the bay, where the light informed every brushstroke he put to canvas from the early 1960s on.

In De Kooning's Bicycle, Long mixes storytelling with history to re-create the lives and events that shaped American art and literature as we know it today, in a landscape where town met country and the modern met America's rural past.

Robert Long is the editor of Long Island Poets and a contributor to The New Yorker and The Partisan Review, among other publications. He lives in East Hampton, New York. Some of the twentieth century's most important artists and writers--from Jackson Pollock to Saul Steinberg, Frank O'Hara to Jean Stafford--lived and worked on the East End of Long Island. The home they made there, and its effect on their work, is the subject of these searching, lyrical vignettes by the critic and poet Robert Long.

Pollock moved to Springs because he thought he wanted to stop drinking, but he found a connection to nature there that inspired some of the most significant paintings of our time. Others followed him. When Fairfield Porter bought a house in Southampton, the New York School suddenly had a new headquarters, and James Schuyler and Frank O'Hara found companionship and raw material for their poems on South Main Street and on the three-hour train ride between the city and the East End. Willem de Kooning rode his bike every day between his studio in the East Hampton woods and the bay, where the light informed every brushstroke he put to canvas from the early 1960s on.

In De Kooning's Bicycle, Long mixes storytelling with history to re-create the lives and events that shaped American art and literature as we know it today, in a landscape where town met country and the modern met America's rural past. You must read these beautifully written and sensitive portraits of several of the major figures in the arts who inhabited the east end of Long Island during its great creative period--de Kooning, Pollock, Krasner, Jean Stafford, Saul Steinberg, and others. Those of us who knew these extraordinary people are grateful to have our memories sharpened; those who are meeting them for the first time here have the thrill of discovery ahead of them. This is an invaluable book.--Edward Albee Before Hollywood invaded the Hamptons and McMansions replaced potato fields, the region played a vital role in the history of mid-twentieth-century American art. Poet and Hamptons native Robert Long tells this engrossing story with a novelist's flair.--John Ashbery If, as de Kooning said, art is a big soup, Robert Long has given us the goggles to plumb for the most delectable bits. Long's memoir ranks with the cultural criticism of Shattuck's Banquet Years: his eye for beauty, masterful style, and historical sense make this a shining gift to the world.--Mary Karr, author of Cherry De Kooning's Bicycle is a beautiful, heartbreaking book and an astonishing act of clairvoyance. Robert Long enters the minds of the brilliant dead--Pollock, de Kooning, O'Hara--and looks through their eyes, infused with the sweetness and melancholy of the East End landscape and its marine light. The book's poetry and emotional precision ensure that it will be not just read but reread.--Luc Sante, author of Low Life New York City's influence on American art and literature is a given. Less well known is the effect of bucolic Long Island. Long, the art critic for the East Hampton Star, offers a vivid history of the Hamptons as a sea-caressed mecca for Manhattan-based painters and writers, a bohemian group who flocked to the shore each summer, beginning in the Gilded Age with William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam. But Long soon wearies of factual reporting and chooses to slip into imaginary inner monologues instead, writing in the voices of Long Island's most notorious artist outlaw, Jackson Pollock; one of the island's most enduring denizens, Willem de Kooning; Fairfield Porter, who lived there with his wife and his lover, James Schuyler; as well as Frank O'Hara, Jean Stafford, and Saul Steinberg. Long's empathic projections are certainly mesmerizing and moving.--Donna Seaman, Booklist In a series of vividly told vignettes, critic and poet Long illustrates how the East End of Long Island indelibly etched a mark on the style and work processes of the abstract impressionists and their artistically minded friends. For artists like Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning and their respective wives, Lee Krasner and Elaine, the Hamptons were a creative playground in the 1950s. Long reimagines their lives there in stories told from the artists' points of view. Pollock, aka Jack the Dripper, and Krasner moved to the East End in 1945 in an attempt to curb the infamous inebriate's drinking and stimulate his talent, and Long cleverly narrates Pollock's artistic methods. When the artist 'unleashed screaming ribbons of cadmium yellow, it was like a hot trumpet solo, ' Long writes, likening his painting process to jazz improvisations. Former MoMA curator Frank O'Hara, Fairfield Porter, Jean Stafford and New Yorker cartoonist Saul Steinberg receive similarly poetic treatment, but it's with titans like Pollock and de Kooning that Long best captures the spirit of modernism as filtered through New York's rural past.--Publishers Weekly

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