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Night

by

Night Cover

ISBN13: 9780374500016
ISBN10: 0374500010
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A New Translation From The French By Marion Wiesel

Night is Elie Wiesels masterpiece, a candid, horrific, and deeply poignant autobiographical account of his survival as a teenager in the Nazi death camps. This new translation by Marion Wiesel, Elies wife and frequent translator, presents this seminal memoir in the language and spirit truest to the authors original intent. And in a substantive new preface, Elie reflects on the enduring importance of Night and his lifelong, passionate dedication to ensuring that the world never forgets mans capacity for inhumanity to man.

Night offers much more than a litany of the daily terrors, everyday perversions, and rampant sadism at Auschwitz and Buchenwald; it also eloquently addresses many of the philosophical as well as personal questions implicit in any serious consideration of what the Holocaust was, what it meant, and what its legacy is and will be.

Elie Wiesel is the author of more than forty internationally acclaimed works of fiction and nonfiction. He has been awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States of America Congressional Gold Medal, the French Legion of Honor, and, in 1986, the Nobel Peace Prize. He is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University.
Night is Elie Wiesel's masterpiece, a candid, horrific, and deeply poignant autobiographical account of his survival as a teenager in the Nazi death camps. This new translation by Marion Wiesel, Elie's wife and frequent translator, corrects important details and presents this seminal memoir in the language and spirit truest to the author's original intent. And in a substantive new preface, Professor Wiesel reflects on the enduring importance of Night and his lifelong, passionate dedication to ensuring that the world never forgets man's capacity for inhumanity to man.

Throughout Night, Professor Wiesel addresses many of the philosophical as well as personal questions implicit in any serious consideration of what the Holocaust was, what it meant, and what its legacy is and will be.

Also included in this new edition is his 1986 Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

“To the best of my knowledge no one has left behind so moving a record.” —Alfred Kazin
“A slim volume of terrifying power.”—The New York Times

“To the best of my knowledge no one has left behind so moving a record.” —Alfred Kazin

“I gain courage from his courage.” —Oprah Winfrey

 
"Wiesel has taken his own anguish and imaginatively metamorphosed it into art."—Curt Leviant, Saturday Review
 
"What makes this book so chilling is not the pretense of what happened but a very real description of every thought, fear and the apathetic attitude demonstrated as a response . . . Night, Wiesel's autobiographical masterpiece, is a heartbreaking memoir.  Wiesel has taken his painful memories and channeled them into an amazing document which chronicles his most intense emotions every step along the way."—Jose Del Real, Anchorage Daily News
 
"As a human document, Night is almost unbearably painful, and certainly beyond criticism."—A. Alvarez, Commentary
 
"To the best of my knowledge no one has left behind him so moving a record."—Alfred Kazin, The Reporter
 
"[Night] must be read by everyone interested in a respectable destiny for the human family."—Emerson Price, The Cleveland Press
 
"Elie Wiesel spent his early years in a small Transylvanian town as one of four children. He was the only one of the family to survive what Francois Maurois, in his introduction, calls the 'human holocaust' of the persecution of the Jews, which began with the restrictions, the singularization of the yellow star, the enclosure within the ghetto, and went on to the mass deportations to the ovens of Auschwitz and Buchenwald. There are unforgettable and horrifying scenes here in this spare and sombre memoir of this experience—of the hanging of a child, of his first farewell with his father who leaves him an inheritance of a knife and a spoon, and of his last goodbye at Buchenwald—his father's corpse is already cold—let alone the long months of survival under unconscionable conditions. The author's youthfulness helps to assure the inevitable comparison with the Anne Frank diary although over and above the sphere of suffering shared, and in this case extended—to the death march itself, there is no spiritual or emotional legacy here to offset any reader reluctance."—Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"A slim volume of terrifying power" The New York Times

Review:

"What I maintain is that this personal record, coming after so many others and describing an outrage about which we might imagine we already know all that it is possible to know, is nevertheless different, distinct, unique....Have we ever thought about the consequence of a horror that, though less apparent, less striking than the other outrages, is yet the worst of all to those of us who have faith: the death of God in the soul of a child who suddenly discovers absolute evil?" Francios Mauriac

Review:

"Wiesel has taken his own anguish and imaginatively metamorphosed it into art." Curt Leviant, Saturday Review

Review:

"As a human document, 'Night' is almost unbearably painful, and certainly beyond criticism." A. Alvarez, Commentary

Synopsis:

This powerful and gripping novel explores what life in the secret annex might have been like for Peter Van Pels.  What it was like to be forced into hiding with Anne, first to hate her and then begin falling in love with her.To sit and wait and watch while others die, and wish you were fighting. 

Annes diary ends on August 4, 1944, but Peters story continues as he details life in Auschwitz with clarity and compassion  – and the horrific fates of the Annexs occupants. Anne Frank's story has never been told quite like this.

Includes a Reader's Guide.

Synopsis:

A New Translation From The French By Marion Wiesel

Night is Elie Wiesel's masterpiece, a candid, horrific, and deeply poignant autobiographical account of his survival as a teenager in the Nazi death camps. This new translation by Marion Wiesel, Elie's wife and frequent translator, presents this seminal memoir in the language and spirit truest to the author's original intent. And in a substantive new preface, Elie reflects on the enduring importance of Night and his lifelong, passionate dedication to ensuring that the world never forgets man's capacity for inhumanity to man.

Night offers much more than a litany of the daily terrors, everyday perversions, and rampant sadism at Auschwitz and Buchenwald; it also eloquently addresses many of the philosophical as well as personal questions implicit in any serious consideration of what the Holocaust was, what it meant, and what its legacy is and will be.

About the Author

Elie Wiesel, the author of some forty books, is Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University.  Mr. Wiesel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 12 comments:

CNH1701, October 19, 2013 (view all comments by CNH1701)
Hawaii and Germany have one significant event in common: World War II. World War II has impacted billions of people, worldwide. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor in Hawai'i and the Holocaust in Germany, many people learned about things that were happening thousands of miles away and they became more aware of the worldly society. In this memoir, Night, by. Elie Wiesel, Eliezer and his family had been sent to a concentration camp in Birkenau. Throughout the memoir, Eliezer had changed and would never be the same.

In Elie Wiesel's memoir, Night, the story of the Jewish Holocaust has been told by a man that survived and lived through it all. Elie Wiesel brings you into the scenes, where you can feel the emotions of the people surrounding him. Pain, sorrow, sadness, anger, and confusion were emotions that were felt by the Jewish people being sent to concentration camps. He vividly describes the Jewish people's feelings arriving in Auschwitz in this excerpt, “But it was all in vain. Our terror could no longer be contained. Our nerves had reached a breaking point. Our very skin was aching. It was as though madness had infected all of us. We gave up."(31). He explained scenes extremely vividly to the point where we could vision it in our heads. Wiesel's strong points also consist of his diction and syntax. For example, an excerpt from Night, “And I, who believe that God is love, what answer was there to give my young interlocutor whose dark eyes still held the reflection of the angelic sadness that had appeared one day on the face of a hanged child?"(13-4). This particular excerpt was one of Wiesel's strongest quotes from the memoir, Night. The intensity of confused emotions, making many Jewish people question God and his presence with them.

This is a memoir that opens your eyes to help you see things through different perspectives. Wiesel's memoir, Night, keeps you on your toes and keeps you from putting the book down! You always question what is going to happen, because it seems as if anything could happen on any day.
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Maddie I, October 19, 2013 (view all comments by Maddie I)
Everyone hears stories about World War II and the horrible things that had happened to the Jewish people. We read a couple things in books and articles about it and shudder at the thought of it happening to us. Night by Elie Wiesel is another one of those unique stories told by someone who actually experienced the horrible internment camps during the Holocaust.
World War II has always intrigued me because I've always wanted to learn more about the experience and how some of the Jewish managed to survive. Night is a great memoir to read if you're looking for someone who lived through the nightmare themselves and can explain the events that happened in great detail.
This memoir is also more than just a story. Elie taps into the subject of religion and how the human mind works under extreme conditions. Although he doesn't outright say it, Elie gets you to think about religion and if your god actually exists and wants to help you. He starts questioning his god about why He hasn't come to save him and everyone else from the concentration camps. Elie also explains how many people become incredibly selfish and self-centered when their lives are on the line.
I really enjoyed this memoir and couldn't stop reading it. It has impacted me a lot by showing me that I should be more grateful to things I have and that I have food on the table everyday because someday it could all be suddenly taken away.
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(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
Linda Cha, September 22, 2012 (view all comments by Linda Cha)
The first time I read this book, I was in high school and it was one of the books we were assigned to read in Honors English. I thought it would be just another assigned reading. The first night we were supposed to read only three chapters. I ended up reading the entire book, which isn't hard it wasn't that thick. I also cried, the sort of sobbing cry when your heart hurts. By the time I was done with the book, I could not help but be stunned at the intensity that such words could bring forth. It is SUCH a good book. Now that I am much older, I have been meaning to buy this book to add to my collection. I'll probably cry if I read it again.
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(2 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780374500016
Author:
Wiesel, Elie
Publisher:
Hill & Wang
Translator:
Wiesel, Marion
Author:
Unknown
Author:
Wiesel, Marion
Author:
Dogar, Sharon
Subject:
Non-Classifiable
Subject:
World war, 1939-1945
Subject:
Jews
Subject:
Holocaust
Subject:
Holocaust, jewish (1939-1945)
Subject:
Historical - Holocaust
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
General Biography
Subject:
Wiesel, Elie - Childhood and youth
Subject:
Jews - Romania - Sighet
Subject:
Concentration camps
Subject:
Romania
Subject:
Biography-Historical
Subject:
Biography - General
Copyright:
Edition Number:
Revised Edition
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
Oprah's Book Club
Publication Date:
20060131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 7
Language:
English
Pages:
144
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 12

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Night Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.95 In Stock
Product details 144 pages Hill & Wang - English 9780374500016 Reviews:
"Review" by , "A slim volume of terrifying power" The New York Times
"Review" by , "What I maintain is that this personal record, coming after so many others and describing an outrage about which we might imagine we already know all that it is possible to know, is nevertheless different, distinct, unique....Have we ever thought about the consequence of a horror that, though less apparent, less striking than the other outrages, is yet the worst of all to those of us who have faith: the death of God in the soul of a child who suddenly discovers absolute evil?"
"Review" by , "Wiesel has taken his own anguish and imaginatively metamorphosed it into art."
"Review" by , "As a human document, 'Night' is almost unbearably painful, and certainly beyond criticism."
"Synopsis" by , This powerful and gripping novel explores what life in the secret annex might have been like for Peter Van Pels.  What it was like to be forced into hiding with Anne, first to hate her and then begin falling in love with her.To sit and wait and watch while others die, and wish you were fighting. 

Annes diary ends on August 4, 1944, but Peters story continues as he details life in Auschwitz with clarity and compassion  – and the horrific fates of the Annexs occupants. Anne Frank's story has never been told quite like this.

Includes a Reader's Guide.

"Synopsis" by ,
A New Translation From The French By Marion Wiesel

Night is Elie Wiesel's masterpiece, a candid, horrific, and deeply poignant autobiographical account of his survival as a teenager in the Nazi death camps. This new translation by Marion Wiesel, Elie's wife and frequent translator, presents this seminal memoir in the language and spirit truest to the author's original intent. And in a substantive new preface, Elie reflects on the enduring importance of Night and his lifelong, passionate dedication to ensuring that the world never forgets man's capacity for inhumanity to man.

Night offers much more than a litany of the daily terrors, everyday perversions, and rampant sadism at Auschwitz and Buchenwald; it also eloquently addresses many of the philosophical as well as personal questions implicit in any serious consideration of what the Holocaust was, what it meant, and what its legacy is and will be.

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