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1 Beaverton Literature- A to Z

The Assistant

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The Assistant Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Introduction by Jonathan Rosen

Bernard Malamuds second novel, originally published in 1957, is the story of Morris Bober, a grocer in postwar Brooklyn, who “wants better” for himself and his family. First two robbers appear and hold him up; then things take a turn for the better when broken-nosed Frank Alpine becomes his assistant. But there are complications: Frank, whose reaction to Jews is ambivalent, falls in love with Helen Bober; at the same time he begins to steal from the store.

Like Malamuds best stories, this novel unerringly evokes an immigrant world of cramped circumstances and great expectations. Malamud defined the immigrant experience in a way that has proven vital for several generations of writers.

Bernard Malamud (1914-1986) published eight novels, including The Fixer, which won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. The Magic Barrel, a collection of short stories, also won the National Book Award. Born in Brooklyn, Malamud was a beloved teacher for many years at Bennington College in Vermont.

Bernard Malamud's second novel, originally published in 1957, is the story of Morris Bober, a grocer in postwar Brooklyn, who "wants better" for himself and his family. First two robbers appear and hold him up; then things improve when broken-nosed Frank Alpine becomes his assistant. But there are complications: Frank, whose reaction to Jews is ambivalent, falls in love with Helen Bober; at the same time, he begins to steal from the store.

Like Malamud's best short stories, this novel unerringly evokes an immigrant world of cramped circumstances and great expectations. In it Malamud defined the immigrant experience in a way that has proven vital for several generations of readers.

"Perfect . . . A lyric marvel."—The Nation

"Malamud's best novel . . . The Assistant is as tightly written as a prose poem."—Morris Dickstein, author of Leopards in the Temple: The Transformation of American Fiction, 1945-1970

"Rightness . . . permeates this book . . . Malamud's people are memorable and real as rock."—William Goyen, The New York Times

"There is a binding theme throughout the book, a search for fundamental truths through the study of ordinary people, their mundane pleasures and pains . . . Malamud's visions, style and world are distinctively original."—San Francisco Chronicle

Synopsis:

Malamud's second novel, originally published in 1957, is the story of Morris Bober, a grocer in postwar Brooklyn, who "wants better" for himself and his family. Like Malamud's best stories, this novel unerringly evokes an immigrant world of cramped circumstances and great expectations.

Synopsis:

Introduction by Jonathan Rosen

Bernard Malamuds second novel, originally published in 1957, is the story of Morris Bober, a grocer in postwar Brooklyn, who “wants better” for himself and his family. First two robbers appear and hold him up; then things take a turn for the better when broken-nosed Frank Alpine becomes his assistant. But there are complications: Frank, whose reaction to Jews is ambivalent, falls in love with Helen Bober; at the same time he begins to steal from the store.

Like Malamuds best stories, this novel unerringly evokes an immigrant world of cramped circumstances and great expectations. Malamud defined the immigrant experience in a way that has proven vital for several generations of writers.

About the Author

Bernard Malamud (1914-1986) also wrote eight novels, he won the Pulitzer Prize and a second National Book award for The Fixer. Born in Brooklyn, he taught for many years at Bennington College in Vermont.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780374504847
Author:
Malamud, Bernard
Publisher:
Farrar Straus Giroux
Author:
Rosen, Jonathan
Location:
New York
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Criminals
Subject:
New york (n.y.)
Subject:
Italian americans
Subject:
Psychological fiction
Subject:
Love stories
Subject:
Domestic fiction
Subject:
Jewish families
Subject:
Brooklyn
Subject:
Jewish fiction.
Subject:
Grocers.
Subject:
Jewish converts from Christianity.
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paperback
Series Volume:
[v.20].
Publication Date:
20030731
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
New Introduction
Pages:
264
Dimensions:
8.26 x 5.45 x 0.72 in

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Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

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Product details 264 pages Farrar Straus Giroux - English 9780374504847 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Malamud's second novel, originally published in 1957, is the story of Morris Bober, a grocer in postwar Brooklyn, who "wants better" for himself and his family. Like Malamud's best stories, this novel unerringly evokes an immigrant world of cramped circumstances and great expectations.
"Synopsis" by ,
Introduction by Jonathan Rosen

Bernard Malamuds second novel, originally published in 1957, is the story of Morris Bober, a grocer in postwar Brooklyn, who “wants better” for himself and his family. First two robbers appear and hold him up; then things take a turn for the better when broken-nosed Frank Alpine becomes his assistant. But there are complications: Frank, whose reaction to Jews is ambivalent, falls in love with Helen Bober; at the same time he begins to steal from the store.

Like Malamuds best stories, this novel unerringly evokes an immigrant world of cramped circumstances and great expectations. Malamud defined the immigrant experience in a way that has proven vital for several generations of writers.

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