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1 Beaverton US History- Lincoln, Abraham

This title in other editions

What Lincoln Believed: The Values and Convictions of America's Greatest President

by

What Lincoln Believed: The Values and Convictions of America's Greatest President Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"Some readers may not recognize their own cherished Lincoln in Lind's well-researched and reasoned book. Yet it adds a valuable perspective to the vast arena of Lincoln scholarship. New 'Lincolns' are perpetually discovered and rediscovered in the context of new times. Lind's aim is to give us a Lincoln in the context of his own times, as a man who lived within history and not above it." Gregory M. Lamb, the Christian Science Monitor (read the entire Christian Science Monitor review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Few biographers and historians have taken Lincoln's ideas seriously or placed him in the context of major intellectual traditions. In What Lincoln Believed, the most comprehensive study ever written of the thought of America?s most revered president, Michael Lind provides a resource to the public philosophy that guided Lincoln as a statesman and shaped the United States.

Although he is often presented as an idealist dedicated to political abstractions, Lincoln was a pragmatic politician with a lifelong interest in science, technology, and economics. Throughout his career he was a disciple of the Kentucky senator Henry Clay, whose "American System" of government support for industrial capitalism Lincoln promoted when he served in the Illinois statehouse, the U.S. Congress, and the White House.

Today Lincoln is remembered for his opposition to slavery and his leadership in guiding the Union to victory in the Civil War. But Lincoln's thinking about these subjects is widely misunderstood. His deep opposition to slavery was rooted in his allegiance to the ideals of the American Revolution. Only late in his life, however, did Lincoln abandon his support for the policy of "colonizing" black Americans abroad, which he derived from Henry Clay and Thomas Jefferson. Lincoln and most of his fellow Republicans opposed the extension of slavery outside of the South because they wanted an all-white West, not a racially integrated society.

Although the Great Emancipator was not the Great Integrationist, he was the Great Democrat. In an age in which many argued that only whites were capable of republican government, Lincoln insisted on the universality of human rights and the potential for democracy everywhere. In a century in which liberal and democratic revolutions against monarchy and dictatorship in Europe and Latin America repeatedly had failed, Lincoln believed that liberal democracy as a form of government was on trial in the American Civil War. "Our popular government has often been called an experiment," Lincoln told the U.S. Congress, insisting that the American people had to prove to the world that "when ballots have fairly, and constitutionally, decided, there can be no successful appeal, back to bullets." If the United States fell apart after the losers in an election took up arms, then people everywhere might conclude that democracy inevitably led to anarchy and "government of the people, by the people, for the people" might well "perish from the earth." "He loved his country partly because it was his own country, but mostly because it was a free country." What Lincoln said of Henry Clay could be said of him as well. In What Lincoln Believed, Michael Lind shows the enduring relevance of Lincoln's vision of the United States as a model of liberty and democracy for the world.

Review:

"Neo-con Lind...administers a much overdue beating to the vast carpet of Lincoln studies." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Ready for inevitable attacks from upholders of an 'evolving' Lincoln, Lind presents his critics with evidence they must overcome." Booklist

Synopsis:

In Independence Hall in Philadelphia on February 22, 1861, where he stopped to speak as he traveled to his inauguration as president of the United States, Lincoln asserted that “the sentiment embodied in” the Declaration of Independence had made the American Revolution a source of “hope to the world for all future time.” Lincoln asked: “Now, my friends, can this country be saved upon that basis? If it can, I will consider myself one of the happiest men in the world if I can help to save it. If it can't be saved upon that principle, it will be truly awful.”

Other presidents might have saved the American Union, and other movements might have produced forms of representative government in other countries. But Abraham Lincoln helped to ensure that “government of the people, by the people, for the people” as an ideal for all of humanity would “not perish from the earth.” Lincoln preserved both the United States and its political creed: “The theory of our government is universal freedom.”

Among American presidents, Abraham Lincoln may be the best known and the least understood. Everyone knows that Lincoln saved the Union and freed the slaves during the American Civil War. Yet few know what he believed and what he stood for in a lifetime as a public figure. What Lincoln Believed is the most comprehensive study ever to appear of Abraham Lincoln’s values, opinions, and political principles.

The historic Lincoln was a far more complex and fascinating figure than the noble frontiersman of American folklore. Although he was born a Baptist and drew on the Bible in his oratory, Lincoln rejected Christianity in favor of deism, the eighteenth-century creed that replaced the God of the Bible with a God known only through nature and history. “Reason, cold, calculating, unimpassioned reason” was the basis of republican government, according to Lincoln.

Born on the frontier, Lincoln preferred city life. Raised on farms, Lincoln dreamed of factories and machines. He devoted much of his political career to promoting the industrialization of the United States by means of the “American System” of his political idol, the Kentucky Senator Henry Clay: national banking, government subsidies for canals and railroads, and the protection of American manufacturing from foreign competition. Fascinated by science and technology, Lincoln was the only American president to try to patent his own invention, a device to free stranded boats from sandbars. A friend recalled, “Intense thought with him was the rule, and not, as with most of us, the exception.”

Lincoln combined a principled and passionate hatred for slavery with a dread of violent upheaval and an inability to imagine a society in which blacks and whites were equals. Only reluctantly did Lincoln make the abolition of slavery, along with the restoration of the Union, one of his aims during the Civil War. And Lincoln was also slow to abandon the policy of “colonization” he derived from Thomas Jefferson and Henry Clay—the plan for the voluntary removal of most or all blacks from the United States.

For Lincoln, the global significance of the Civil War lay not in the abolition of slavery but in the demonstration that a democracy could be strong enough to suppress an unlawful rebellion. “We must settle this question right now, whether in a free government the minority have the right to break up the government whenever they choose. If we fail it will go far to prove the incapacity of the people to govern themselves.” If the United States broke apart, then democracy might be rejected as impractical elsewhere in the world, and “government of the people, by the people, for the people” would “perish from the earth.”

“No policy that does not rest upon some philosophic public opinion can be permanently maintained,” Lincoln once declared. In this groundbreaking book, the public philosophy that guided the deeds and statements of America’s greatest president is revealed in its entirety for the first time. Shattering stereotypes and dispelling myths, What Lincoln Believed will forever transform the way his fellow Americans and the world think of Abraham Lincoln.

Synopsis:

Few biographers and historians have taken Lincoln’s ideas seriously or placed him in the context of major intellectual traditions. In What Lincoln Believed, the most comprehensive study ever written of the thought of America’s most revered president, Michael Lind provides a resource to the public philosophy that guided Lincoln as a statesman and shaped the United States.

Although he is often presented as an idealist dedicated to political abstractions, Lincoln was a pragmatic politician with a lifelong interest in science, technology, and economics. Throughout his career he was a disciple of the Kentucky senator Henry Clay, whose “American System” of government support for industrial capitalism Lincoln promoted when he served in the Illinois statehouse, the U.S. Congress, and the White House.

Today Lincoln is remembered for his opposition to slavery and his leadership in guiding the Union to victory in the Civil War. But Lincoln’s thinking about these subjects is widely misunderstood. His deep opposition to slavery was rooted in his allegiance to the ideals of the American Revolution. Only late in his life, however, did Lincoln abandon his support for the policy of “colonizing” black Americans abroad, which he derived from Henry Clay and Thomas Jefferson. Lincoln and most of his fellow Republicans opposed the extension of slavery outside of the South because they wanted an all-white West, not a racially integrated society.

Although the Great Emancipator was not the Great Integrationist, he was the Great Democrat. In an age in which many argued that only whites were capable of republican government, Lincoln insisted on the universality of human rights and the potential for democracy everywhere. In a century in which liberal and democratic revolutions against monarchy and dictatorship in Europe and Latin America repeatedly had failed, Lincoln believed that liberal democracy as a form of government was on trial in the American Civil War. “Our popular government has often been called an experiment,” Lincoln told the U.S. Congress, insisting that the American people had to prove to the world that “when ballots have fairly, and constitutionally, decided, there can be no successful appeal, back to bullets.” If the United States fell apart after the losers in an election took up arms, then people everywhere might conclude that democracy inevitably led to anarchy and “government of the people, by the people, for the people” might well “perish from the earth.”

“He loved his country partly because it was his own country, but mostly because it was a free country.” What Lincoln said of Henry Clay could be said of him as well. In What Lincoln Believed, Michael Lind shows the enduring relevance of Lincoln’s vision of the United States as a model of liberty and democracy for the world.

About the Author

Michael Lind is the best-selling author of a number of books of nonfiction, fiction, and poetry, including The Next American Nation (1995) and Hamilton's Republic: Readings in American Democratic Nationalism (1997). A former editor or writer for Harper's magazine, the New Yorker and the New Republic, Lind is the Whitehead Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation in Washington, D.C.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385507394
Author:
Lind, Michael
Publisher:
Random House
Author:
Lind, Michael
Location:
New York
Subject:
Historical - U.S.
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Presidents
Subject:
Social values
Subject:
Presidents & Heads of State
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Series Volume:
no. 160
Publication Date:
May 2005
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
9.76x6.08x1.13 in. 1.41 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Biography » Presidents and Heads of State
History and Social Science » US History » Presidents » Lincoln, Abraham

What Lincoln Believed: The Values and Convictions of America's Greatest President Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.95 In Stock
Product details 368 pages Doubleday Books - English 9780385507394 Reviews:
"Review A Day" by , "Some readers may not recognize their own cherished Lincoln in Lind's well-researched and reasoned book. Yet it adds a valuable perspective to the vast arena of Lincoln scholarship. New 'Lincolns' are perpetually discovered and rediscovered in the context of new times. Lind's aim is to give us a Lincoln in the context of his own times, as a man who lived within history and not above it." (read the entire Christian Science Monitor review)
"Review" by , "Neo-con Lind...administers a much overdue beating to the vast carpet of Lincoln studies."
"Review" by , "Ready for inevitable attacks from upholders of an 'evolving' Lincoln, Lind presents his critics with evidence they must overcome."
"Synopsis" by , In Independence Hall in Philadelphia on February 22, 1861, where he stopped to speak as he traveled to his inauguration as president of the United States, Lincoln asserted that “the sentiment embodied in” the Declaration of Independence had made the American Revolution a source of “hope to the world for all future time.” Lincoln asked: “Now, my friends, can this country be saved upon that basis? If it can, I will consider myself one of the happiest men in the world if I can help to save it. If it can't be saved upon that principle, it will be truly awful.”

Other presidents might have saved the American Union, and other movements might have produced forms of representative government in other countries. But Abraham Lincoln helped to ensure that “government of the people, by the people, for the people” as an ideal for all of humanity would “not perish from the earth.” Lincoln preserved both the United States and its political creed: “The theory of our government is universal freedom.”

Among American presidents, Abraham Lincoln may be the best known and the least understood. Everyone knows that Lincoln saved the Union and freed the slaves during the American Civil War. Yet few know what he believed and what he stood for in a lifetime as a public figure. What Lincoln Believed is the most comprehensive study ever to appear of Abraham Lincoln’s values, opinions, and political principles.

The historic Lincoln was a far more complex and fascinating figure than the noble frontiersman of American folklore. Although he was born a Baptist and drew on the Bible in his oratory, Lincoln rejected Christianity in favor of deism, the eighteenth-century creed that replaced the God of the Bible with a God known only through nature and history. “Reason, cold, calculating, unimpassioned reason” was the basis of republican government, according to Lincoln.

Born on the frontier, Lincoln preferred city life. Raised on farms, Lincoln dreamed of factories and machines. He devoted much of his political career to promoting the industrialization of the United States by means of the “American System” of his political idol, the Kentucky Senator Henry Clay: national banking, government subsidies for canals and railroads, and the protection of American manufacturing from foreign competition. Fascinated by science and technology, Lincoln was the only American president to try to patent his own invention, a device to free stranded boats from sandbars. A friend recalled, “Intense thought with him was the rule, and not, as with most of us, the exception.”

Lincoln combined a principled and passionate hatred for slavery with a dread of violent upheaval and an inability to imagine a society in which blacks and whites were equals. Only reluctantly did Lincoln make the abolition of slavery, along with the restoration of the Union, one of his aims during the Civil War. And Lincoln was also slow to abandon the policy of “colonization” he derived from Thomas Jefferson and Henry Clay—the plan for the voluntary removal of most or all blacks from the United States.

For Lincoln, the global significance of the Civil War lay not in the abolition of slavery but in the demonstration that a democracy could be strong enough to suppress an unlawful rebellion. “We must settle this question right now, whether in a free government the minority have the right to break up the government whenever they choose. If we fail it will go far to prove the incapacity of the people to govern themselves.” If the United States broke apart, then democracy might be rejected as impractical elsewhere in the world, and “government of the people, by the people, for the people” would “perish from the earth.”

“No policy that does not rest upon some philosophic public opinion can be permanently maintained,” Lincoln once declared. In this groundbreaking book, the public philosophy that guided the deeds and statements of America’s greatest president is revealed in its entirety for the first time. Shattering stereotypes and dispelling myths, What Lincoln Believed will forever transform the way his fellow Americans and the world think of Abraham Lincoln.

"Synopsis" by , Few biographers and historians have taken Lincoln’s ideas seriously or placed him in the context of major intellectual traditions. In What Lincoln Believed, the most comprehensive study ever written of the thought of America’s most revered president, Michael Lind provides a resource to the public philosophy that guided Lincoln as a statesman and shaped the United States.

Although he is often presented as an idealist dedicated to political abstractions, Lincoln was a pragmatic politician with a lifelong interest in science, technology, and economics. Throughout his career he was a disciple of the Kentucky senator Henry Clay, whose “American System” of government support for industrial capitalism Lincoln promoted when he served in the Illinois statehouse, the U.S. Congress, and the White House.

Today Lincoln is remembered for his opposition to slavery and his leadership in guiding the Union to victory in the Civil War. But Lincoln’s thinking about these subjects is widely misunderstood. His deep opposition to slavery was rooted in his allegiance to the ideals of the American Revolution. Only late in his life, however, did Lincoln abandon his support for the policy of “colonizing” black Americans abroad, which he derived from Henry Clay and Thomas Jefferson. Lincoln and most of his fellow Republicans opposed the extension of slavery outside of the South because they wanted an all-white West, not a racially integrated society.

Although the Great Emancipator was not the Great Integrationist, he was the Great Democrat. In an age in which many argued that only whites were capable of republican government, Lincoln insisted on the universality of human rights and the potential for democracy everywhere. In a century in which liberal and democratic revolutions against monarchy and dictatorship in Europe and Latin America repeatedly had failed, Lincoln believed that liberal democracy as a form of government was on trial in the American Civil War. “Our popular government has often been called an experiment,” Lincoln told the U.S. Congress, insisting that the American people had to prove to the world that “when ballots have fairly, and constitutionally, decided, there can be no successful appeal, back to bullets.” If the United States fell apart after the losers in an election took up arms, then people everywhere might conclude that democracy inevitably led to anarchy and “government of the people, by the people, for the people” might well “perish from the earth.”

“He loved his country partly because it was his own country, but mostly because it was a free country.” What Lincoln said of Henry Clay could be said of him as well. In What Lincoln Believed, Michael Lind shows the enduring relevance of Lincoln’s vision of the United States as a model of liberty and democracy for the world.

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