Poetry Madness
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | April 11, 2014

Paul Laudiero: IMG Shit Rough Draft



I was sitting in a British and Irish romantic drama class my last semester in college when the idea for Shit Rough Drafts hit me. I was working... Continue »
  1. $9.07 Sale Trade Paper add to wish list

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$9.95
List price: $26.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Local Warehouse Psychology- General

One Hundred Names for Love: A Stroke, a Marriage, and the Language of Healing

by

One Hundred Names for Love: A Stroke, a Marriage, and the Language of Healing Cover

ISBN13: 9780393072419
ISBN10: 039307241x
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $9.95!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Everyone who cherishes the gift of language will cherish Diane Ackerman's narrative masterpiece, an exquisitely written love story and medical miracle story, one that combines science, inspiration, wisdom, and heart.

One day Ackerman's husband, Paul West, an exceptionally gifted wordsmith and intellectual, suffered a terrible stroke. When he regained awareness he was afflicted with aphasia--loss of language--and could utter only a single syllable: "mem." The standard therapies yielded little result but frustration. Diane soon found, however, that by harnessing their deep knowledge of each other and her scientific understanding of language and the brain she could guide Paul back to the world of words. This triumphant book is both a humane and revealing addition to the medical literature on stroke and aphasia and an exquisitely written love story: a magnificent addition to literature, period.

Review:

"Two phrasemakers and longtime married partners had to relearn a shared, intimate conversation post-stroke as Ackerman narrates in her touching latest work. Paul West, Ackerman's 75-year-old British husband (she is 18 years younger), was a retired English professor and the author of 50-plus books, survivor of diabetes and a pacemaker, when he was struck by a massive stroke that left 'a small wasteland' in his brain, especially in the key language areas. For literary minds like West and Ackerman, his inability to formulate language (reduced to repeating numbly the sounds 'mem, mem, mem' in anger and confusion) was a shock to them both: 'o be so godlike, and yet so fragile,' his wife writes in despair. Her memoir of this terrible time, first in the hospital, then at home, records the small victories in his speech making and numerous frustrating setbacks; she even took it upon herself to make up humorous but challenging exercises for him to do, Mad Libs — style. Contrary to the bleak prognosis, West gradually made progress, while their journey makes for goofy, pun-happy reading, a little like overhearing lovers coo to each other. (Apr.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Synopsis:

"Diane Ackerman's most enjoyable, intimate, and heartrending work yet."--Atul Gawande

Synopsis:

Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize
Finalist for the National Book Circle Critics Award

"Diane Ackerman's most enjoyable, intimate, and heartrending work yet."--Atul Gawande

Video

About the Author

Diane Ackerman is the acclaimed author of A Natural History of the Senses, the bestselling The Zookeeper's Wife, Dawn Light, One Hundred Names for Love, and many other books. She lives in Ithaca, New York, and Palm Beach, Florida.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

Sara Sugihara, January 28, 2012 (view all comments by Sara Sugihara)
A brilliant, sad, moving, wonderful, funny book about a devastating stroke and the way the author's husband came back to her and to life. I cried.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
ace davis, January 1, 2012 (view all comments by ace davis)
This book speaks most eloquently of the power and the cost of hanging in with someone in most difficult and ambiguous circumstances. Fortunately, her sweetie makes a most impressive recovery, in part because of not believing dire prognoses and aggressively pursuing rehab. Just the list of pet names at the end is worth the whole book
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
N, September 23, 2011 (view all comments by N)
Fascinating book! Diane Ackerman's usual wonderful writing -- this time about her husband's stroke, aphasia and recovery. Lots of laughter, touching moments in a marriage and remarkable insight into the way the brain works. A truly amazing book!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393072419
Author:
Ackerman, Diane
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Subject:
Medical
Subject:
Biography/Medical
Subject:
Biography - General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20110431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
322
Dimensions:
9.25000 x 6.12500 in

Other books you might like

  1. You Can Count on Monsters: The First... Used Trade Paper $13.95
  2. The Last Town on Earth
    Used Hardcover $7.50

Related Subjects

Biography » General
Biography » Medical
Featured Titles » Spirituality and Wellness
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Heart Care and Stroke
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Biographies
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » General

One Hundred Names for Love: A Stroke, a Marriage, and the Language of Healing Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 322 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393072419 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Two phrasemakers and longtime married partners had to relearn a shared, intimate conversation post-stroke as Ackerman narrates in her touching latest work. Paul West, Ackerman's 75-year-old British husband (she is 18 years younger), was a retired English professor and the author of 50-plus books, survivor of diabetes and a pacemaker, when he was struck by a massive stroke that left 'a small wasteland' in his brain, especially in the key language areas. For literary minds like West and Ackerman, his inability to formulate language (reduced to repeating numbly the sounds 'mem, mem, mem' in anger and confusion) was a shock to them both: 'o be so godlike, and yet so fragile,' his wife writes in despair. Her memoir of this terrible time, first in the hospital, then at home, records the small victories in his speech making and numerous frustrating setbacks; she even took it upon herself to make up humorous but challenging exercises for him to do, Mad Libs — style. Contrary to the bleak prognosis, West gradually made progress, while their journey makes for goofy, pun-happy reading, a little like overhearing lovers coo to each other. (Apr.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Synopsis" by , "Diane Ackerman's most enjoyable, intimate, and heartrending work yet."--Atul Gawande
"Synopsis" by , Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize
Finalist for the National Book Circle Critics Award

"Diane Ackerman's most enjoyable, intimate, and heartrending work yet."--Atul Gawande
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.