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3 Local Warehouse Literature- A to Z

This title in other editions

Crescent

by

Crescent Cover

 

Staff Pick

This is a kind of pampering. One enters a woman's world steeped with sensual and lyrical concerns. Psychology is laced with luxurious metaphor. A very insightful and pleasurable read.
Recommended by Mark, Powell's Books at Cedar Hills Crossing

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Thirty-nine-year-old Sirine, never married, lives with a devoted Iraqi-immigrant uncle and an adoring dog named King Babar. She works as a chef in a Lebanese restaurant, her passions aroused only by the preparation of food — until an unbearably handsome Arabic literature professor starts dropping by for a little home cooking. Falling in love brings Sirene's whole heart to a boil — stirring up memories of her parents and questions about her identity as an Arab American.

Praised by critics from The New Yorker to USA Today for her first novel, Arabian Jazz ("an oracular tale that unfurls like gossamer"), Diana Abu-Jaber weaves with spellbinding magic a multidimensional love story set in the Arab-American community of Los Angeles.

Written in a lush, lyrical style reminiscent of The God of Small Things, infused with the flavors and scents of Middle Eastern food, and spiced with history and fable, Crescent is a sensuous love story and a gripping tale of risk and commitment.

Review:

"[B]eautifully imagined and timely....Abu-Jaber's poignant contemplations of exile and her celebration of Sirine's exotic, committed domesticity...help make this novel feel as exquisite as the 'flaming, blooming' mejnoona tree behind Nadia's Cafe." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Abu-Jaber's language is miraculous....It is not possible to stop reading." GraceAnne DeCandido, Booklist (Starred Review)

Review:

"A story that unfolds beautifully, as lightly and naturally as a roll of silk." The Nation

Review:

"Abu-Jaber's voluptuous prose features insights into the Arab-American community that are wisely, warmly depicted." San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"A powerful story about the loneliness of exile and the limits of love. An impressive second outing by Abu-Jaber." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Exquisite....Readers stuffed on headlines but still hungering for something relevant will enjoy this rich meal." Christian Science Monitor

Review:

"Gorgeously written and deeply imagined, this novel is both a fable and a plea — a book that weaves a hypnotic, lasting spell." Beth Kephart, Book Magazine

Review:

"A pleasing hybrid of Like Water for Chocolate and Haroun and the Sea of Stories." Orlando Sentinel

Review:

"[A] lovely tale...an urgent mix of Scheherazade-style storytelling and treatise on the loneliness of exile." Andrea Spencer, The Oregonian

Review:

"Abu-Jaber affirms the precious fragility of life, love, family, and the human community in meaningful ways." Sena Jeter Naslund, author of Ahab's Wife: Or, the Star-Gazer

Review:

"Abu-Jaber is a high-spirited, magnificently graceful storyteller, a poet of deliciously fluted fiction, character, and culture." Naomi Shihab Nye, author of Words Under the Words

Review:

"Crescent is a rich, delicious concoction that has you rooting for the star-crossed lovers." John Muncie, The Baltimore Sun

Review:

"Radiant, wise, and passionate....[Abu-Jaber] never for an instant relinquished her grip on this willingly enchanted reader." Beth Kephart, Chicago Tribune

Review:

"Wise, spirited, and evocative, this work offers an ardent look at the human side of political cant." Library Journal

Review:

"Romantic, whimsical and wonderful in every way, being both sensuous and smart. I want to hang out all day at Nadia's Cafe." Whitney Otto, author of How to Make an American Quilt

Synopsis:

Sirine is thirty-nine, never married, and lives in the Arab-American community of Los Angeles known as Irangeles. She has a passion for cooking and works contentedly in a Lebanese restaurant, while her storytelling uncle and her saucy boss, Umm Nadia, believe she should be trying harder to find a husband. One day a handsome professor of Arabic literature, an Iraqi exile, comes to the restaurant, and Sirine finds herself falling in love and, in the process, starts questioning her identity as an Arab-American.

Synopsis:

When a handsome professor of Arabic literature and Iraqi exile enters her life, single, 39-year-old Sirine finds herself falling in love and, in the process, starts questioning her identity as an Arab-American.

About the Author

Diana Abu-Jaber lives in Florida and teaches at the University of Miami. She is also the author of Arabian Jazz.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 6 comments:

jadelin, March 6, 2010 (view all comments by jadelin)
Crescent is a story of stories. It is a beautiful, poignant and at times, bittersweet, love story, one with deep roots in history and culture. At first, the novel seemed to be headed in the direction of a conventional love story. However, about one-third of the way through, the author adds a tremendous amount of life by way of disclosing what is beneath the surface literally and figuratively--from the past and present, with hints toward what is to come. Be warned, the book revolves around detailed and scrumptious Middle Eastern cooking and food--you might not want to read it on an empty stomach!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Cakey, January 17, 2010 (view all comments by Cakey)
Everyone should read this book. Everyone. It was such a pleasure to read, with some tragedy mixed in. I keep waiting for the movie -- which should be made with smell-a-vision. You'll understand that comment if you read the book.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)
kimberly8, January 1, 2010 (view all comments by kimberly8)
I felt like I could just taste everything the main character made. I felt like I was one of her customers, yet also privy to her life in the kitchen, that was a character unto itself. The bantering with the family and the customers were heartfelt, poignant and just funny at times. I loved the story that was told at the beginning of the chapter and how it seemed to parallel to foreshadow what would happen next. And then there was the love between two people helping to find themselves and their place in America and the World. Yes, food and love; love and food.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
View all 6 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393325546
Author:
Abu-Jaber, Diana
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Subject:
General
Subject:
Restaurants
Subject:
College teachers
Subject:
Los angeles (calif.)
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st paperback ed.
Publication Date:
May 2004
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
6" x 8"

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Related Subjects

Featured Titles » Literature
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Romance » General

Crescent Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$2.50 In Stock
Product details 416 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393325546 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

This is a kind of pampering. One enters a woman's world steeped with sensual and lyrical concerns. Psychology is laced with luxurious metaphor. A very insightful and pleasurable read.

"Review" by , "[B]eautifully imagined and timely....Abu-Jaber's poignant contemplations of exile and her celebration of Sirine's exotic, committed domesticity...help make this novel feel as exquisite as the 'flaming, blooming' mejnoona tree behind Nadia's Cafe."
"Review" by , "Abu-Jaber's language is miraculous....It is not possible to stop reading."
"Review" by , "A story that unfolds beautifully, as lightly and naturally as a roll of silk."
"Review" by , "Abu-Jaber's voluptuous prose features insights into the Arab-American community that are wisely, warmly depicted."
"Review" by , "A powerful story about the loneliness of exile and the limits of love. An impressive second outing by Abu-Jaber."
"Review" by , "Exquisite....Readers stuffed on headlines but still hungering for something relevant will enjoy this rich meal."
"Review" by , "Gorgeously written and deeply imagined, this novel is both a fable and a plea — a book that weaves a hypnotic, lasting spell."
"Review" by , "A pleasing hybrid of Like Water for Chocolate and Haroun and the Sea of Stories."
"Review" by , "[A] lovely tale...an urgent mix of Scheherazade-style storytelling and treatise on the loneliness of exile."
"Review" by , "Abu-Jaber affirms the precious fragility of life, love, family, and the human community in meaningful ways."
"Review" by , "Abu-Jaber is a high-spirited, magnificently graceful storyteller, a poet of deliciously fluted fiction, character, and culture."
"Review" by , "Crescent is a rich, delicious concoction that has you rooting for the star-crossed lovers."
"Review" by , "Radiant, wise, and passionate....[Abu-Jaber] never for an instant relinquished her grip on this willingly enchanted reader."
"Review" by , "Wise, spirited, and evocative, this work offers an ardent look at the human side of political cant."
"Review" by , "Romantic, whimsical and wonderful in every way, being both sensuous and smart. I want to hang out all day at Nadia's Cafe."
"Synopsis" by , Sirine is thirty-nine, never married, and lives in the Arab-American community of Los Angeles known as Irangeles. She has a passion for cooking and works contentedly in a Lebanese restaurant, while her storytelling uncle and her saucy boss, Umm Nadia, believe she should be trying harder to find a husband. One day a handsome professor of Arabic literature, an Iraqi exile, comes to the restaurant, and Sirine finds herself falling in love and, in the process, starts questioning her identity as an Arab-American.
"Synopsis" by , When a handsome professor of Arabic literature and Iraqi exile enters her life, single, 39-year-old Sirine finds herself falling in love and, in the process, starts questioning her identity as an Arab-American.
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