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The Slightly True Story of Cedar B. Hartley (Who Planned to Live an Unusual Life)

The Slightly True Story of Cedar B. Hartley (Who Planned to Live an Unusual Life) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A wonderfully human and humane debut from the Australian Kate DiCamillo

Cedar B. Hartley is exasperating and potentially infamous.

She steps on cracks. She plans to live an unusual life. She is the winner of her school's Bat Pole Championship (which she made up). She misses her brother Barnaby, who ran away, and who sends her postcards from all over. And she's definitely a hopeless winker.

But Cedar B. Hartley has potential. She knows the long distance between an idea and the real thing. And she has a green thumb for people — which will come in handy as she discovers truths about her friends, her family, and her life.

Review:

"Cedar B. Hartley, the 12-year-old narrator of Australian author Murray's promising if uneven debut, takes pride in belonging to a three-person 'puddle' on her street: 'A puddle isn't just what's left behind, although sometimes you may feel like it is. A puddle of people is full of rich deposits.' So Cedar sticks with Caramella Zito, who is 11, extremely shy and chubby, and a 'brilliant artist'; and with Ricci, a middle-aged Yugoslavian emigree who takes Valium and dotes on her dog. Cedar's widowed mom is busy with her job, and Cedar misses her 19-year-old brother, Barnaby, who has run away from boarding school (but sends postcards with quasi-poetic messages). Then Cedar meets Kite, a boy with 'the voice of a river.' The son of a circus performer, Kite starts teaching Cedar complicated acrobatic feats, and Cedar achieves flexibility and balance both on and off the gymnastics mat. The narrative voice wobbles, and Cedar can sound precocious in places and unconvincingly na ve elsewhere. But at her best, Murray is capable of startling power, as in this description of an epiphany: 'You stop knowing how things are. Instead of what you know, there are the patterns that stars make;... the small aching spot where your feet touch the earth... And you've never felt closer to it. You think that if there is an It, you and It are nearly touching.' Ages 9-14." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

About the Author

Martine Murray is the author of THE SLIGHTLY TRUE STORY OF CEDAR B. HARTLEY, which received three starred reviews and was named to Booklist's roundup of Top Ten First Novels for Youth. She lives in Victoria, Australia.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780439486231
Publisher:
Scholastic Paperbacks
Location:
New York
Author:
Murray, Martine
Subject:
General
Subject:
Family
Subject:
Children's 9-12 - Fiction - General
Subject:
Social Situations - General
Subject:
Australia
Subject:
Juvenile fiction
Subject:
Acrobatics
Subject:
General Juvenile Fiction
Subject:
Social Issues - General
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Edition Description:
Paperback
Series Volume:
1305
Publication Date:
20040801
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 4 up to 7
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
7.63 x 5.25 in
Age Level:
09-12

Related Subjects

Children's » Middle Readers » General

The Slightly True Story of Cedar B. Hartley (Who Planned to Live an Unusual Life)
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 240 pages Scholastic Paperbacks - English 9780439486231 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Cedar B. Hartley, the 12-year-old narrator of Australian author Murray's promising if uneven debut, takes pride in belonging to a three-person 'puddle' on her street: 'A puddle isn't just what's left behind, although sometimes you may feel like it is. A puddle of people is full of rich deposits.' So Cedar sticks with Caramella Zito, who is 11, extremely shy and chubby, and a 'brilliant artist'; and with Ricci, a middle-aged Yugoslavian emigree who takes Valium and dotes on her dog. Cedar's widowed mom is busy with her job, and Cedar misses her 19-year-old brother, Barnaby, who has run away from boarding school (but sends postcards with quasi-poetic messages). Then Cedar meets Kite, a boy with 'the voice of a river.' The son of a circus performer, Kite starts teaching Cedar complicated acrobatic feats, and Cedar achieves flexibility and balance both on and off the gymnastics mat. The narrative voice wobbles, and Cedar can sound precocious in places and unconvincingly na ve elsewhere. But at her best, Murray is capable of startling power, as in this description of an epiphany: 'You stop knowing how things are. Instead of what you know, there are the patterns that stars make;... the small aching spot where your feet touch the earth... And you've never felt closer to it. You think that if there is an It, you and It are nearly touching.' Ages 9-14." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
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