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Original Essays | September 15, 2014

Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



There's this writer, William Shakespeare. Perhaps you've heard of him. He wrote this play, Romeo and Juliet. Maybe you've heard of it as well. It's... Continue »
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    Juliet's Nurse

    Lois Leveen 9781476757445

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1 Beaverton Literature- A to Z

Galway Bay

by

Galway Bay Cover

ISBN13: 9780446579001
ISBN10: 0446579009
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $7.95!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Here at last is one Irish family's epic journey, capturing the tragedy and triumph of the Irish-American experience. In a rousing tale that echoes the myths and legends of Ireland herself, young Honora Keeley and Michael Kelly wed and start a family, inhabiting a hidden Ireland where fishermen and tenant farmers find solace in their ancient faith, songs, stories, and communal celebrations. Selling both their catch — and their crops — to survive, these people subsist on the potato crop — their only staple food. But when blight destroys the potatoes three times in four years, a callous government and uncaring landlords turn a natural disaster into The Great Starvation that will kill one million. Honora and Michael vow their children will live. The family joins two million other Irish refugees in one of the greatest rescues in human history: the Irish Emigration to America. Danger and hardship await them there. Honora and her unconventional sister Maire watch their seven sons as they transform Chicago from a frontier town to the City of the Century, fight the Civil War, and enlist in the cause of Ireland's freedom. The Kelly clan is victorious. This heroic story sheds brilliant light on the ancestors of today's 44 million Irish Americans.

In the author's colorful and eclectic life, she has written and directed award-winning documentaries on Irish subjects, as well as the dramatic feature Proud. She's been an associate producer on Good Morning America and Saturday Night Live, written books on Martin Scorsese, World War II, and Bosnia, and a novel based on her experiences as a former nun — Special Intentions. She is a frequent contributor to Irish America Magazine and has a PhD in English and Irish literature.

Review:

"In this scattered retelling of her own family's struggles during the Great Irish Starvation, Kelly captures the suffering but neglects the inner lives of her thinly drawn characters. In Bearna, Ireland, in 1839, Honora Keeley falls in love with Michael Kelly after finding him swimming in Galway Bay, and they soon marry despite her father's objections. For a short time, life, while far from perfect, is sweet. Then comes the blight, destroying most of their potato crop. After losing the harvest for the third time in four years, the Kellys flee to America and settle in Chicago. Though the research is meticulous and the famine horrors are catalogued in great detail, the Kellys' lives in America are presented haphazardly, making it difficult to keep track of the huge cast of characters when decades are skipped seemingly at random. The characters themselves function more as types — greedy landlords, arrogant Englishmen — to further the plot. Despite its flaws, the novel may appeal to fans of Frank McCourt and Irish history, as the trials of the Kelly family echo the struggle of the Irish to assimilate while retaining their own heritage." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

In a rousing tale that echoes the myths and legends of Ireland herself, young Honora Keeley and Michael Kelly wed and start a family. So begins one Irish family's epic journey, in this novel that captures the tragedy and triumph of the Irish-American experience.

Synopsis:

In a hidden Ireland where fishermen and tenant farmers find solace in their ancient faith, songs, stories, and communal celebrations, young Honora Keeley and Michael Kelly wed and start a family. Because they and their countrymen must sell both their catch and their crops to pay exorbitant rents, potatoes have become their only staple food.

But when blight destroys the potatoes three times in four years, a callous government and uncaring landlords turn a natural disaster into The Great Starvation that will kill one million. Honora and Michael vow their children will live. The family joins two million other Irish refugees--victims saving themselves--in the emigration from Ireland.

Danger and hardship await them in America. Honora, her unconventional sister Máire, and their seven sons help transform Chicago from a frontier town to the "City of the Century." The boys go on to fight in the Civil War and enlist in the cause of Ireland's freedom.

Spanning six generations and filled with joy, sadness, and heroism, GALWAY BAY sheds brilliant light on the ancestors of today's forty-four million Irish Americans--and is a universal story you will never forget.

About the Author

Mary Patricia Kelly is the author of a novel Special Intentions, and nonfiction on subjects as varied as Martin Scorsese and the rescue of Scott O'Grady from Bosnia. In her life, she has been everything from a nun to a documentary filmmaker to a producer of short films for "Saturday Night Live". She lives in New York City.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 5 comments:

gealachleanbh, October 17, 2011 (view all comments by gealachleanbh)
Mary Pat Kelly created a world in which, unfortunately, my relatives also lived in right in Galway. I was so moved by this book, I could not stop reading it even when it was searing my senses. My husband, good man that he is, got me a signed copy for Christmas the year it came out. It holds a treasured spot on my bookshelf. Some day, I will have the courage to read it again, and remember what my family went through. Thank you Mary Kelly.
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(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)
Dutchlvr1, June 30, 2009 (view all comments by Dutchlvr1)
After reading all the reviews on this book, It's on my TBR list. This would be a new author for me, which I always love finding.
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(0 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
Ellen Howard, February 19, 2009 (view all comments by Ellen Howard)
This is a terrific story! You will never forget the horrors suffered in Ireland by Honora and her sister Maire, the women's courage to cross the Atlantic, and their ultimate triumph over adversity in Chicago. In today's harsh economic times, perhaps we can draw strength from reflecting on the many privations our ancestors overcame. Highly recommended. If you read the review in Publishers Weekly, the only negative one I've seen, please also see Kirkus Reviews, Library Journal, Booklist, America Magazine, and Romantic Times--all great!
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(3 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780446579001
Author:
Kelly, Mary Pat
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing
Subject:
History
Subject:
Ireland
Subject:
General
Subject:
Historical - General
Subject:
Historical fiction
Subject:
Domestic fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Literary
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20110228
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
576
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 1.5 in 1.38 lb

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Galway Bay Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 576 pages Grand Central Publishing - English 9780446579001 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In this scattered retelling of her own family's struggles during the Great Irish Starvation, Kelly captures the suffering but neglects the inner lives of her thinly drawn characters. In Bearna, Ireland, in 1839, Honora Keeley falls in love with Michael Kelly after finding him swimming in Galway Bay, and they soon marry despite her father's objections. For a short time, life, while far from perfect, is sweet. Then comes the blight, destroying most of their potato crop. After losing the harvest for the third time in four years, the Kellys flee to America and settle in Chicago. Though the research is meticulous and the famine horrors are catalogued in great detail, the Kellys' lives in America are presented haphazardly, making it difficult to keep track of the huge cast of characters when decades are skipped seemingly at random. The characters themselves function more as types — greedy landlords, arrogant Englishmen — to further the plot. Despite its flaws, the novel may appeal to fans of Frank McCourt and Irish history, as the trials of the Kelly family echo the struggle of the Irish to assimilate while retaining their own heritage." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , In a rousing tale that echoes the myths and legends of Ireland herself, young Honora Keeley and Michael Kelly wed and start a family. So begins one Irish family's epic journey, in this novel that captures the tragedy and triumph of the Irish-American experience.
"Synopsis" by , In a hidden Ireland where fishermen and tenant farmers find solace in their ancient faith, songs, stories, and communal celebrations, young Honora Keeley and Michael Kelly wed and start a family. Because they and their countrymen must sell both their catch and their crops to pay exorbitant rents, potatoes have become their only staple food.

But when blight destroys the potatoes three times in four years, a callous government and uncaring landlords turn a natural disaster into The Great Starvation that will kill one million. Honora and Michael vow their children will live. The family joins two million other Irish refugees--victims saving themselves--in the emigration from Ireland.

Danger and hardship await them in America. Honora, her unconventional sister Máire, and their seven sons help transform Chicago from a frontier town to the "City of the Century." The boys go on to fight in the Civil War and enlist in the cause of Ireland's freedom.

Spanning six generations and filled with joy, sadness, and heroism, GALWAY BAY sheds brilliant light on the ancestors of today's forty-four million Irish Americans--and is a universal story you will never forget.

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