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Rock, Paper, Scissors: Game Theory in Everyday Life

by

Rock, Paper, Scissors: Game Theory in Everyday Life Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A world-class mathematician and regular contributor to the New York Times hosts a delightful tour of the greatest ideas of math, revealing how it connects to literature, philosophy, law, medicine, art, business, even pop culture in ways we never imagined

Did O.J. do it? How should you flip your mattress to get the maximum wear out of it? How does Google search the Internet? How many people should you date before settling down? Believe it or not, math plays a crucial role in answering all of these questions and more.

Math underpins everything in the cosmos, including us, yet too few of us understand this universal language well enough to revel in its wisdom, its beauty and#8212; and its joy. This deeply enlightening, vastly entertaining volume translates math in a way that is at once intelligible and thrilling. Each trenchant chapter of The Joy ofand#160;x offers an and#8220;aha!and#8221; moment, starting with why numbers are so helpful, and progressing through the wondrous truths implicit in and#960;, the Pythagorean theorem, irrational numbers, fat tails, even the rigors and surprising charms of calculus. Showing why he has won awards as a professor at Cornell and garnered extensive praise for his articles about math for the New York Times, Strogatz presumes of his readers only curiosity and common sense. And he rewards them with clear, ingenious, and often funny explanations of the most vital and exciting principles of his discipline.

Whether you aced integral calculus or arenand#8217;t sure what an integer is, youand#8217;ll find profound wisdom and persistent delight in The Joy of x.

Review:

"Physicist and Ig Nobel Prize — winner Fisher (How to Dunk a Doughnut) explores how game theory illuminates social behavior in this lively study. Developed in the 1940s, game theory is concerned with the decisions people make when confronted with competitive situations, especially when they have limited information about the other players' choices. Every competitive situation has a point called a Nash Equilibrium, in which parties cannot change their course of action without sabotaging themselves, and Fisher demonstrates that situations can be arranged so that the Nash Equilibrium is the best possible outcome for everyone. To this end, he examines how social norms and our sense of fair play can produce cooperative solutions rather than competitive ones. Fisher comes up short of solving the problem of human competitiveness, but perhaps that is too tall an order. Game theory works better as a toolkit for understanding behavior than as a rule book for directing it. Fisher does succeed in making the complex nature of game theory accessible and relevant, showing how mathematics applies to the dilemmas we face on a daily basis." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

The IgNobel Prize-winning author of How to Dunk a Doughnut draws on the science of game theory to explain how human beings cooperate in everyday life.

Synopsis:

A delightful tour of the greatest ideas of math, showing how math intersects withand#160;philosophy, science, art, business, current events, and everyday life, by an acclaimed science communicator and regular contributor to the New York Times.

Synopsis:

"Delightful . . . easily digestible chapters include plenty of helpful examples and illustrations. You'll never forget the Pythagorean theorem again!"and#8212;Scientific American

Many people take math in high school and promptly forget much of it. But math plays a part in all of our lives all of the time, whether we know it or not. In The Joy of x, Steven Strogatz expands on his hit New York Times series to explain the big ideas of math gently and clearly, with wit, insight, and brilliant illustrations.

Whether he is illuminating how often you should flip your mattress to get the maximum lifespan from it, explaining just how Google searches the internet, or determining how many people you should date before settling down, Strogatz shows how math connects to every aspect of life. Discussing pop culture, medicine, law, philosophy, art, and business, Strogatz is the math teacher you wish youand#8217;d had. Whether you aced integral calculus or arenand#8217;t sure what an integer is, youand#8217;ll find profound wisdom and persistent delight in The Joy of x.

Synopsis:

Praised by Entertainment Weekly as “the man who put the fizz into physics,” Dr. Len Fisher turns his attention to the science of cooperation in his lively and thought-provoking book. Fisher shows how the modern science of game theory has helped biologists to understand the evolution of cooperation in nature, and investigates how we might apply those lessons to our own society. In a series of experiments that take him from the polite confines of an English dinner party to crowded supermarkets, congested Indian roads, and the wilds of outback Australia, not to mention baseball strategies and the intricacies of quantum mechanics, Fisher sheds light on the problem of global cooperation. The outcomes are sometimes hilarious, sometimes alarming, but always revealing. A witty romp through a serious science, Rock, Paper, Scissors will both teach and delight anyone interested in what it what it takes to get people to work together.

About the Author

Len Fisher, Ph.D., is Visiting Research Fellow in the Physics Department at the University of Bristol. He is the author of Weighing the Soul and How to Dunk a Doughnut, which was named Best Popular Science Book of 2004 by the American Institute of Physics. He has been featured on the BBC, CBS, and the Discovery Channel, as well as in newspapers such as the Wall Street Journal, the San Francisco Chronicle, and more. He is the recipient of a 1999 IgNobel Prize for calculating the optimal way to dunk a doughnut. He lives in Wiltshire, England, and Blackheath, Australia.

Table of Contents

Prefaceand#8195;ix

Part Oneand#8195;Numbers

From Fish to Infinityand#8195;3

An introduction to numbers, pointing out their upsides (theyand#8217;re efficient) as well as their downsides (theyand#8217;re ethereal)

Rock Groupsand#8195;7

Treating numbers concretelyand#8212;think rocksand#8212;can make calculations less baffling.

The Enemy of My Enemyand#8195;15

The disturbing concept of subtraction, and how we deal with the fact that negative numbers seem so .and#160;.and#160;. negative

Commutingand#8195;23

When you buy jeans on sale, do you save more money if the clerk applies the discount after the tax, or before?

Division and Its Discontentsand#8195;29

Helping Verizon grasp the difference between .002 dollars and .002 cents

Location, Location, Locationand#8195;35

How the place-value system for writing numbers brought arithmetic to the masses

Part Twoand#8195;Relationships

The Joy of xand#8195;45

Arithmetic becomes algebra when we begin working with unknowns and formulas.

Finding Your Rootsand#8195;51

Complex numbers, a hybrid of the imaginary and the real, are the pinnacle of number systems.

My Tub Runneth Overand#8195;59

Turning peril to pleasure in word problems

Working Your Quadsand#8195;67

The quadratic formula may never win any beauty contests, but the ideas behind it are ravishing.

Power Toolsand#8195;75

In math, the function of functions is to transform.

Part Threeand#8195;Shapes

Square Dancingand#8195;85

Geometry, intuition, and the long road from Pythagoras to Einstein

Something from Nothingand#8195;93

Like any other creative act, constructing a proof begins with inspiration.

The Conic Conspiracyand#8195;101

The uncanny similarities between parabolas and ellipses suggest hidden forces at work.

Sine Qua Nonand#8195;113

Sine waves everywhere, from Ferris wheels to zebra stripes

Take It to the Limitand#8195;121

Archimedes recognized the power of the infinite and in the process laid the groundwork for calculus.

Part Fourand#8195;Change

Change We Can Believe Inand#8195;131

Differential calculus can show you the best path from A to B, and Michael Jordanand#8217;s dunks help explain why.

It Slices, It Dicesand#8195;139

The lasting legacy of integral calculus is a Veg-O-Matic view of the universe.

All about eand#8195;147

How many people should you date before settling down? Your grandmother knowsand#8212;and so does the number e.

Loves Me, Loves Me Notand#8195;155

Differential equations made sense of planetary motion. But the course of true love? Now thatand#8217;s confusing.

Step Into the Lightand#8195;161

A light beam is a pas de deux of electric and magnetic fields, and vector calculus is its choreographer.

Part Fiveand#8195;Data

The New Normaland#8195;175

Bell curves are out. Fat tails are in.

Chances Areand#8195;183

The improbable thrills of probability theory

Untangling the Weband#8195;191

How Google solved the Zen riddle of Internet search using linear algebra

Part Sixand#8195;Frontiers

The Loneliest Numbersand#8195;201

Prime numbers, solitary and inscrutable, space themselves apart in mysterious ways.

Group Thinkand#8195;211

Group theory, one of the most versatile parts of math, bridges art and science.

Twist and Shoutand#8195;219

Playing with Mand#246;bius strips and music boxes, and a better way to cut a bagel

Think Globallyand#8195;229

Differential geometry reveals the shortest route between two points on a globe or any other curved surface.

Analyze This!and#8195;237

Why calculus, once so smug and cocky, had to put itself on the couch

The Hilbert Hoteland#8195;249

An exploration of infinity as this book, not being infinite, comes to an end

Acknowledgmentsand#8195;257

Notesand#8195;261

Creditsand#8195;307

Indexand#8195;309

Product Details

ISBN:
9780465009381
Author:
Fisher, Len
Publisher:
Basic Books (AZ)
Author:
Strogatz, Steven
Subject:
General science
Subject:
General
Subject:
Game Theory
Subject:
System Theory
Subject:
Mathematics-Modeling
Subject:
General Mathematics
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20081131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
154 b/w Illustrations
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1.18 lb

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Economics » General
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Reference » Science Reference » General
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Science and Mathematics » Mathematics » General
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Rock, Paper, Scissors: Game Theory in Everyday Life Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.50 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Basic Books - English 9780465009381 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Physicist and Ig Nobel Prize — winner Fisher (How to Dunk a Doughnut) explores how game theory illuminates social behavior in this lively study. Developed in the 1940s, game theory is concerned with the decisions people make when confronted with competitive situations, especially when they have limited information about the other players' choices. Every competitive situation has a point called a Nash Equilibrium, in which parties cannot change their course of action without sabotaging themselves, and Fisher demonstrates that situations can be arranged so that the Nash Equilibrium is the best possible outcome for everyone. To this end, he examines how social norms and our sense of fair play can produce cooperative solutions rather than competitive ones. Fisher comes up short of solving the problem of human competitiveness, but perhaps that is too tall an order. Game theory works better as a toolkit for understanding behavior than as a rule book for directing it. Fisher does succeed in making the complex nature of game theory accessible and relevant, showing how mathematics applies to the dilemmas we face on a daily basis." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
The IgNobel Prize-winning author of How to Dunk a Doughnut draws on the science of game theory to explain how human beings cooperate in everyday life.
"Synopsis" by ,
A delightful tour of the greatest ideas of math, showing how math intersects withand#160;philosophy, science, art, business, current events, and everyday life, by an acclaimed science communicator and regular contributor to the New York Times.
"Synopsis" by ,
"Delightful . . . easily digestible chapters include plenty of helpful examples and illustrations. You'll never forget the Pythagorean theorem again!"and#8212;Scientific American

Many people take math in high school and promptly forget much of it. But math plays a part in all of our lives all of the time, whether we know it or not. In The Joy of x, Steven Strogatz expands on his hit New York Times series to explain the big ideas of math gently and clearly, with wit, insight, and brilliant illustrations.

Whether he is illuminating how often you should flip your mattress to get the maximum lifespan from it, explaining just how Google searches the internet, or determining how many people you should date before settling down, Strogatz shows how math connects to every aspect of life. Discussing pop culture, medicine, law, philosophy, art, and business, Strogatz is the math teacher you wish youand#8217;d had. Whether you aced integral calculus or arenand#8217;t sure what an integer is, youand#8217;ll find profound wisdom and persistent delight in The Joy of x.

"Synopsis" by ,
Praised by Entertainment Weekly as “the man who put the fizz into physics,” Dr. Len Fisher turns his attention to the science of cooperation in his lively and thought-provoking book. Fisher shows how the modern science of game theory has helped biologists to understand the evolution of cooperation in nature, and investigates how we might apply those lessons to our own society. In a series of experiments that take him from the polite confines of an English dinner party to crowded supermarkets, congested Indian roads, and the wilds of outback Australia, not to mention baseball strategies and the intricacies of quantum mechanics, Fisher sheds light on the problem of global cooperation. The outcomes are sometimes hilarious, sometimes alarming, but always revealing. A witty romp through a serious science, Rock, Paper, Scissors will both teach and delight anyone interested in what it what it takes to get people to work together.
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