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Marry Him: The Case for Settling for Mr. Good Enough

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Marry Him: The Case for Settling for Mr. Good Enough Cover

ISBN13: 9780525951513
ISBN10: 0525951512
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Lori Gottlieb discusses Marry Him in a video on The Atlantic website. You have a fulfilling job, a great group of friends, the perfect apartment, and no shortage of dates. So what if you haven't found The One just yet. Surely he'll come along, right?

But what if he doesn't? Or even worse, what if he already has, but you just didn't realize it?

Suddenly finding herself forty and single, Lori Gottlieb said the unthinkable in her March 2008 article in The Atlantic: Maybe she and single women everywhere, needed to stop chasing the elusive Prince Charming and instead go for Mr. Good Enough.

Looking at her friends' happy marriages to good enough guys who happen to be excellent husbands and fathers, Gottlieb declared it time to reevaluate what we really need in a partner. Her ideas created a firestorm of controversy from outlets like the Today show to The Washington Post, which wrote, "Given the perennial shortage of perfect men, Gottlieb's probably got a point," to Newsweek and NPR, which declared, "Lori Gottlieb didn't want to take her mother's advice to be less picky, but now that she's turned forty, she wonders if her mother is right." Women all over the world were talking. But while many people agreed that they should have more realistic expectations, what did that actually mean out in the real world, where Gottlieb and women like her were inexorably drawn to their "type"?

That's where Marry Him comes in.

By looking at everything from culture to biology, in Marry Him Gottlieb frankly explores the dilemma that so many women today seem to face--how to reconcile the strong desire for a husband and family with a list of must-haves so long and complicated that many great guys get rejected out of the gate. Here Gottlieb shares her own journey in the quest for romantic fulfillment, and in the process gets wise guidance and surprising insights from marital researchers, matchmakers, dating coaches, behavioral economists, neuropsychologists, sociologists, couples therapists, divorce lawyers, and clergy--as well as single and married men and women, ranging in age from their twenties to their sixties.

Marry Him is an eye-opening, often funny, sometimes painful, and always truthful in-depth examination of the modern dating landscape, and ultimately, a provocative wake-up call about getting real about Mr. Right.

Review:

"Building on her Atlantic article, 40-something single mom Gottlieb (Stick Figure) sought the advice of matchmakers, dating coaches, clergy, economists, and psychologists in her quest for a husband. She learned that women today bring a dangerous sense of entitlement to dating. Instead, Gottlieb says, women need to be more open-minded and realistic, and just choose the best available option when it comes to a mate and appreciate him. Although familiar, the advice doled out also makes good sense, and Gottlieb is personable and appealing." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

In an eye-opening, brutally honest, often funny, sometimes painful journey that culminates in a redefining of romance, Gottlieb expands on her 2008 article in "The Atlantic" that explores women's acceptance of Mr. Good-Enough rather than waiting for Prince Charming.

Synopsis:

The controversial national bestseller!

Nearly forty and single, Lori Gottlieb faced the unthinkable: she'd wasted her best years chasing an elusive Prince Charming who might not even exist. Meanwhile, her friends who'd "settled" for Mr. Good Enough ended up married to excellent husbands and fathers.

This is an eye-opening, funny, painful, and always truthful in-depth examination of modern relationships and a wake-up call about getting real about Mr. Right.

Synopsis:

When Lori Gottlieb found herself forty and still single, she came to an uncomfortable realization. If so many of her friends were very happily married to good enough guys, the type of men who might not make you weak in the knees but made great partners and fathers, maybe she had been approaching her dating life completely wrong. If she hadn't found Mr. Right, maybe she'd been focused on the wrong things. Could her Mr. Right have been, well, right in front of her all along?

In the March 2008 issue of The Atlantic, she asked, Would you rather hold out for Prince Charming and risk that he'll never show up, or be more realistic and share your life with a guy who'll make a good teammate in the trenches of family life? Lori Gottlieb argued for the latter. The furor that erupted was immediate, with coverage in media outlets as varied as Today, NPR, and The Wall Street Journal. Some accused her of setting feminism back decades; others spoke warmly of marriages in which love grew slowly over time. Men complained that women were too picky; women believed they were entitled to be picky. Clearly, she had touched a nerve.

The most common response came from women who said that they couldn't seem to meet the right guy, and just weren't feeling it with the nice guys they'd met. How important was it? How, they wondered, do you separate compromising from settling? In Marry Him, Lori decides to find out. Along the way, she talks to marital researchers, behavioral economists, neuropsychologists, sociologists, couples therapists, divorce lawyers, matchmakers, dating coaches, and clergy about the realities of the modern dating landscape. The result is an eye-opening, brutally honest, often funny, sometimes painful journey that culminates in a redefining of romance.

About the Author

Lori Gottlieb is the author of the national bestseller Stick Figure: A Diary of My Former Self and a journalist whose work has appeared in The New York Times, The Atlantic, Time, People, Slate, Self, Glamour, Elle, Salon, and the Los Angeles Times. She is also a frequent commentator for NPR’s All Things Considered.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

dapperdan, December 6, 2009 (view all comments by dapperdan)
To be fair I've not actually read this, but I DID read Ms. Gottlieb Atlantic article and this whole "settling" thing made me mad as hell. She's a good writer, witty, etc, but what is the deal with "good enough"? If you REALLY want to communicate how you feel just leave this book where he can see it or give him a box of dog poop for christmas. Nothing screams "I'm going to cheat on you the first chance I get!" quite like this.
Perhaps a better title would have been "Getting over yourself-you're not all that and a bag of chips"

I'm not sure what women this book is geared toward but I strongly advise you to read this book and consider what "settling" and "good enough" mean to you. Then you REALLY need to pass it on or get rid of it. (No offense intended toward Ms. Gottlieb-hey it could be the best thing you ever did and wind up with a great husband)
BUT
No guy I've ever known would want to be Mr. Barely adequate, Mr. Bottom-of-the-barrel, Mr. last chance.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780525951513
Subtitle:
The Case for Settling for Mr. Good Enough
Author:
Gottlieb, Lori
Publisher:
NAL Trade
Subject:
Marriage
Subject:
Personal Growth - General
Subject:
Women -- Psychology.
Subject:
Man-woman relationships -- United States.
Subject:
Love & Romance
Subject:
Interpersonal Relations
Subject:
Self-Help/Relationships
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20110201
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
10.00x6.50x1.00 in. 1.15 lbs.
Age Level:
17-17

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Relationships
History and Social Science » Sociology » General

Marry Him: The Case for Settling for Mr. Good Enough Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.50 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Dutton Books - English 9780525951513 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Building on her Atlantic article, 40-something single mom Gottlieb (Stick Figure) sought the advice of matchmakers, dating coaches, clergy, economists, and psychologists in her quest for a husband. She learned that women today bring a dangerous sense of entitlement to dating. Instead, Gottlieb says, women need to be more open-minded and realistic, and just choose the best available option when it comes to a mate and appreciate him. Although familiar, the advice doled out also makes good sense, and Gottlieb is personable and appealing." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , In an eye-opening, brutally honest, often funny, sometimes painful journey that culminates in a redefining of romance, Gottlieb expands on her 2008 article in "The Atlantic" that explores women's acceptance of Mr. Good-Enough rather than waiting for Prince Charming.
"Synopsis" by ,
The controversial national bestseller!

Nearly forty and single, Lori Gottlieb faced the unthinkable: she'd wasted her best years chasing an elusive Prince Charming who might not even exist. Meanwhile, her friends who'd "settled" for Mr. Good Enough ended up married to excellent husbands and fathers.

This is an eye-opening, funny, painful, and always truthful in-depth examination of modern relationships and a wake-up call about getting real about Mr. Right.

"Synopsis" by , When Lori Gottlieb found herself forty and still single, she came to an uncomfortable realization. If so many of her friends were very happily married to good enough guys, the type of men who might not make you weak in the knees but made great partners and fathers, maybe she had been approaching her dating life completely wrong. If she hadn't found Mr. Right, maybe she'd been focused on the wrong things. Could her Mr. Right have been, well, right in front of her all along?

In the March 2008 issue of The Atlantic, she asked, Would you rather hold out for Prince Charming and risk that he'll never show up, or be more realistic and share your life with a guy who'll make a good teammate in the trenches of family life? Lori Gottlieb argued for the latter. The furor that erupted was immediate, with coverage in media outlets as varied as Today, NPR, and The Wall Street Journal. Some accused her of setting feminism back decades; others spoke warmly of marriages in which love grew slowly over time. Men complained that women were too picky; women believed they were entitled to be picky. Clearly, she had touched a nerve.

The most common response came from women who said that they couldn't seem to meet the right guy, and just weren't feeling it with the nice guys they'd met. How important was it? How, they wondered, do you separate compromising from settling? In Marry Him, Lori decides to find out. Along the way, she talks to marital researchers, behavioral economists, neuropsychologists, sociologists, couples therapists, divorce lawyers, matchmakers, dating coaches, and clergy about the realities of the modern dating landscape. The result is an eye-opening, brutally honest, often funny, sometimes painful journey that culminates in a redefining of romance.

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