Signed Edition Sweepstakes
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Interviews | September 2, 2014

Jill Owens: IMG David Mitchell: The Powells.com Interview



David MitchellDavid Mitchell's newest mind-bending, time-skipping novel may be his most accomplished work yet. Written in six sections, one per decade, The Bone... Continue »
  1. $21.00 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The Bone Clocks

    David Mitchell 9781400065677

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$7.50
List price: $14.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
3 Burnside Sustainable Living- General
1 Home & Garden Home Construction- Sustainable Living

Sugarhouse: Turning the Neighborhood Crack House Into Our Home Sweet Home

by

Sugarhouse: Turning the Neighborhood Crack House Into Our Home Sweet Home Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"You're married, you're getting older, and your parents are looking more and more like the grandparents they are pestering you to make them. It's getting embarrassing. Your pathetic renter's mailbox — the one with three former tenants names crossed out — is stuffed with your friends baby shower invitations. Just a few months ago, right after my grandmother died, five different people mentioned the word Ultrasound to me on the same day. It was both onomatopoetic and devastating."

In the cruel, cruel summer of a recent year, this was the condition in which Matt Batt and his young wife, Jenae, found themselves. Transient residents of higher-education-inspired locations like Columbus, OH, Madison, WI, Boston, MA, and eventually St. Paul, MN, they were, quite unexpectedly, living, working and renting in Salt Lake City, UT. And when a vicious series of deaths in their respective, immediate families set their anxious sights on some semblance of stability, they landed upon a flamboyantly dilapidated house in the Sugarhouse section of Salt Lake. With a shaky young marriage and a full-blown ¼ life crisis on their hands, these perpetual grad-students/waiters/non-profiteers with no homesteading experience whatsoever, decided they would turn this yellow former crack house into a home. Dizzy with despair, doubt and the side effects of using the rough equivalent of napalm to detoxify their house, Matt and Jenae found themselves fighting for their marriage, alternately dodging and accepting the burdens and joys of becoming fully committed adults, while trying to figure out how the hell a rented power sander works.

Review:

"A fixer-upper is just the thing to usher a young couple into adulthood, in this winsome memoir. Writing professor Batt and his wife, in the midst of the housing bubble, found their dream home — and when that deal fell through, settled for a Salt Lake City crack house that came complete with an eye-watering stench, tacky wood paneling, and hidden structural defects. The ensuing renovation gave the neophyte handyman an epic test of masculine resolve, a new appreciation for the aesthetics of slate flooring and poured-concrete countertops, and insight into the foundation of a successful marriage — namely, complete submission to female authority over decor. Meanwhile, Batt weathers upheavals among his extended relations — deaths, tensions, his cantankerous grandfather's embarrassing fling with a younger gold digger — that form an alternately antic and glum commentary on the ricketiness of the home-building enterprise. Batt's home-rehab picaresque is hilarious, engrossing, and stocked with a cast of squirrely tradesmen and manic realtors. At times the use of real estate as a metaphor for marital commitment is overdone, especially given the glibness with which he and his wife sell their castle. Still, his is a charming take on domesticity. Agent, Jim Rutman. (June 19)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

"Whether the focus is on the installation of a hand-cut slate floor tile or Grandpa's new floozy girlfriend, Batts retelling is fast-paced. Everyone has a crazy family, but who has a crazy family and a crack house to renovate into a first home at the same time? That takes guts or insanity, and the fun of this book in finding out how it all ends up. VERDICT His description of 'I don't belong here' aisles in Home Depot feels so familiar. While it's no how-to, this book makes it fun to follow Batts how-we-did-it, warts and all." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"It's hard to write funny, especially when your world is crumbling around you, but in this utterly compelling memoir, Matt Batt makes it look easy. This is a sweet and deeply memorable debut by a writer who's clearly the real thing." Library Journal

Review:

"Sugarhouse is hilarious. It's also sad. And uplifting. Ultimately it's a story about the most quotidian and most important thing any of us will do: make a home. Anyone who has ever argued over floor tile, loved a willful grandparent, or wondered what an orbital sander is, will enjoy this charming book." Andre Dubus III, author of Townie

Review:

"Matt Batt proves himself an oddball cousin to Thoreau and Tracy Kidder in Sugarhouse, a charming and compelling memoir in which a professor of writing decides to renovate a disaster of a house. Read the first two chapters, and you are likely to sign on eagerly for the rest of the telling, which shuttles easily back and forth from theory to practice, from humorous narrative to deepening meditation." Billy Collins, poet laureate of the United States, 2001-2003

Synopsis:

This witty and affecting memoir relays the misadventures of a commitment-phobic couple who, on the heels of a heartbreaking year, try to catapult themselves into adulthood by purchasing a dilapidated former crack house and attempting to turn it into a home.

Synopsis:

An improbably funny account of how the purchase and restoration of a disaster of a fixer-upper saves a young marriage

When a season of ludicrous loss tests the mettle of their marriage, Matthew Batt and his wife decide not to call it quits. They set their sights instead on the purchase of a dilapidated house in the Sugarhouse section of Salt Lake City. With no homesteading experience and a full-blown quarter-life crisis on their hands, these perpetual grad students/waiters/nonprofiteers decide to seek salvation through renovation, and do all they can to turn a former crack house into a home. Dizzy with despair, doubt, and the side effects of using the rough equivalent of napalm to detoxify their house, they enter into full-fledged adulthood with power tools in hand.

Heartfelt and joyous, Sugarhouse is the story of how one couple conquers adversity and creates an addition to their family, as well as their home.

About the Author

Matt Batt's work has appeared in Tin House and on The Huffington Post and elsewhere. The Missouri Review recently called him a "heavy hitter" of nonfiction, and he's been nominated six times for the Pushcart Prize and is the recipient of an individual Artist Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Table of Contents

  1

What Well Call Home 3

The Scene and the Scenery 9

Economy 20

The Cuts and Clarities of Diamonds 36

Chuck Norris Time 48

South of Bountifu 61

On Moving On 70

  2

Gathering Jacks 85

The Mandoor 94

This Little Knife of Mine 103

Fast Dancing 117

Lesser Acts of Transubstantiation 126

Remnants of an Ancient Sea 143

Getting Out of Sand Traps 160

In Defense of Dilettantes 175

Behind the Confectionary 187

Finish, Carpenter! 207

  3

Watershed 225

Homecoming 251

  Acknowledgments 255

Product Details

ISBN:
9780547634531
Author:
Batt, Matthew
Publisher:
Mariner Books
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Construction-Do It Yourself
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20120631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8 x 5.31 in 1 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Invisible Monsters Remix Sale Trade Paper $7.98

Related Subjects


Biography » Literary
Engineering » Construction » Do It Yourself
Engineering » Construction » Sustainable Housing
Engineering » Home Construction » General
Engineering » Home Construction » Sustainable Living
Featured Titles » Cooking and Gardening
Featured Titles » General
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Biographies
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » General
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Memoirs
Home and Garden » Sustainable Living » General
Home and Garden » Sustainable Living » Housing
Science and Mathematics » Agriculture » Sustainable Living
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Sustainable Living
Sugarhouse: Turning the Neighborhood Crack House Into Our Home Sweet Home Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.50 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Mariner Books - English 9780547634531 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A fixer-upper is just the thing to usher a young couple into adulthood, in this winsome memoir. Writing professor Batt and his wife, in the midst of the housing bubble, found their dream home — and when that deal fell through, settled for a Salt Lake City crack house that came complete with an eye-watering stench, tacky wood paneling, and hidden structural defects. The ensuing renovation gave the neophyte handyman an epic test of masculine resolve, a new appreciation for the aesthetics of slate flooring and poured-concrete countertops, and insight into the foundation of a successful marriage — namely, complete submission to female authority over decor. Meanwhile, Batt weathers upheavals among his extended relations — deaths, tensions, his cantankerous grandfather's embarrassing fling with a younger gold digger — that form an alternately antic and glum commentary on the ricketiness of the home-building enterprise. Batt's home-rehab picaresque is hilarious, engrossing, and stocked with a cast of squirrely tradesmen and manic realtors. At times the use of real estate as a metaphor for marital commitment is overdone, especially given the glibness with which he and his wife sell their castle. Still, his is a charming take on domesticity. Agent, Jim Rutman. (June 19)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , "Whether the focus is on the installation of a hand-cut slate floor tile or Grandpa's new floozy girlfriend, Batts retelling is fast-paced. Everyone has a crazy family, but who has a crazy family and a crack house to renovate into a first home at the same time? That takes guts or insanity, and the fun of this book in finding out how it all ends up. VERDICT His description of 'I don't belong here' aisles in Home Depot feels so familiar. While it's no how-to, this book makes it fun to follow Batts how-we-did-it, warts and all."
"Review" by , "It's hard to write funny, especially when your world is crumbling around you, but in this utterly compelling memoir, Matt Batt makes it look easy. This is a sweet and deeply memorable debut by a writer who's clearly the real thing."
"Review" by , "Sugarhouse is hilarious. It's also sad. And uplifting. Ultimately it's a story about the most quotidian and most important thing any of us will do: make a home. Anyone who has ever argued over floor tile, loved a willful grandparent, or wondered what an orbital sander is, will enjoy this charming book."
"Review" by , "Matt Batt proves himself an oddball cousin to Thoreau and Tracy Kidder in Sugarhouse, a charming and compelling memoir in which a professor of writing decides to renovate a disaster of a house. Read the first two chapters, and you are likely to sign on eagerly for the rest of the telling, which shuttles easily back and forth from theory to practice, from humorous narrative to deepening meditation."
"Synopsis" by , This witty and affecting memoir relays the misadventures of a commitment-phobic couple who, on the heels of a heartbreaking year, try to catapult themselves into adulthood by purchasing a dilapidated former crack house and attempting to turn it into a home.
"Synopsis" by ,

An improbably funny account of how the purchase and restoration of a disaster of a fixer-upper saves a young marriage

When a season of ludicrous loss tests the mettle of their marriage, Matthew Batt and his wife decide not to call it quits. They set their sights instead on the purchase of a dilapidated house in the Sugarhouse section of Salt Lake City. With no homesteading experience and a full-blown quarter-life crisis on their hands, these perpetual grad students/waiters/nonprofiteers decide to seek salvation through renovation, and do all they can to turn a former crack house into a home. Dizzy with despair, doubt, and the side effects of using the rough equivalent of napalm to detoxify their house, they enter into full-fledged adulthood with power tools in hand.

Heartfelt and joyous, Sugarhouse is the story of how one couple conquers adversity and creates an addition to their family, as well as their home.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.