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1 Local Warehouse Cooking and Food- Diet and Nutrition

Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think

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Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think Cover

ISBN13: 9780553804348
ISBN10: 0553804340
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In this illuminating and groundbreaking new book, food psychologist Brian Wansink shows why you may not realize how much you're eating, what you're eating — or why you're even eating at all.
  • Does food with a brand name really taste better?
  • Do you hate brussels sprouts because your mother did?
  • Does the size of your plate determine how hungry you feel?
  • How much would you eat if your soup bowl secretly refilled itself?
  • What does your favorite comfort food really say about you?
  • Why do you overeat so much at healthy restaurants?
Brian Wansink is a Stanford Ph.D. and the director of the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab. He's spent a lifetime studying what we don&'t notice: the hidden cues that determine how much and why people eat. Using ingenious, fun, and sometimes downright fiendishly clever experiments like the "bottomless soup bowl," Wansink takes us on a fascinating tour of the secret dynamics behind our dietary habits. How does packaging influence how much we eat? Which movies make us eat faster? How does music or the color of the room influence how much we eat? How can we recognize the "hidden persuaders" used by restaurants and supermarkets to get us to mindlessly eat? What are the real reasons most diets are doomed to fail? And how can we use the "mindless margin" to lose — instead of gain — ten to twenty pounds in the coming year?

Mindless Eating will change the way you look at food, and it will give you the facts you need to easily make smarter, healthier, more mindful and enjoyable choices at the dinner table, in the supermarket, in restaurants, at the office — even at a vending machine — wherever you decide to satisfy your appetite.

Review:

"According to Wansink, director of the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab, the mind makes food-related decisions, more than 200 a day, and many of them without pause for actual thought. This peppy, somewhat pop-psych book argues that we don't have to change what we eat as much as how, and that by making more mindful food-related decisions we can start to eat and live better. The author's approach isn't so much a diet book as a how-to on better facilitating the interaction between the feed-me messages of our stomachs and the controls in our heads. In their particulars, the research summaries are entertaining, like an experiment that measured how people ate when their plates were literally 'bottomless,' but the cumulative message and even the approach feels familiar and not especially fresh. Wansink examines popular diets like the South Beach and Atkins regimes, and offers a number of his own strategies to help focus on what you eat: at a dinner party, 'try to be the last person to start eating.' Whether readers take time to weigh their decisions and their fruits and vegetables remains to be seen." Publishers Weekly "(Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"According to Wansink, director of the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab, the mind makes food-related decisions, more than 200 a day, and many of them without pause for actual thought. This peppy, somewhat pop-psych book argues that we don't have to change what we eat as much as how, and that by making more mindful food-related decisions we can start to eat and live better. The author's approach isn't so much a diet book as a how-to on better facilitating the interaction between the feed-me messages of our stomachs and the controls in our heads. In their particulars, the research summaries are entertaining, like an experiment that measured how people ate when their plates were literally 'bottomless,' but the cumulative message and even the approach feels familiar and not especially fresh. Wansink examines popular diets like the South Beach and Atkins regimes, and offers a number of his own strategies to help focus on what you eat: at a dinner party, 'try to be the last person to start eating.' Whether readers take time to weigh their decisions and their fruits and vegetables remains to be seen." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Wansink's dual approach emphasizing food knowledge and self-knowledge offers a sensible route to permanent weight loss." Booklist

Review:

"[Mindless Eating] does more than just chastise those of us guilty of stuffing our faces. It also examines the effectiveness of such popular diets as South Beach or Atkins, and offers useful tips to consciously eat nutritiously." Boston Herald

Synopsis:

Brian Wansink, Ph.D., is an Iowa native and earned his doctorate at Stanford University. He is the John S. Dyson Professor of Marketing and of Nutritional Science at Cornell University, where he is Director of the Cornell Food and Brand Lab. The author of three profesional books on food and consumer behavior, he lives with his family in Ithaca, New York, where he enjoys both French food and French fries each week.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

Denise8, January 1, 2011 (view all comments by Denise8)
An easily-digested book related to what and how we humans eat, often without thought or plan. The author is a scientist with a sense of humor who explains concepts clearly, with wit and wisdom. Brian Wansink shows us not only our mindless actions and their effects, but how to modify them painlessly to lose weight and gain health without the rules of a weight-loss diet.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Janelle, May 31, 2007 (view all comments by Janelle)
This is simply a great book. As a nutritionist of more than 20 years, I have read many of the studies the author Brian Wansink reviews. These studies are sometimes hard to believe because they tell us (and Brian Wansink tells us) that despite our best intentions, despite our intelligence and caring deeply about eating well and eating "appropriately" "normally"that we *all* are manipulated into eating much more than we think. I gained a new insight into these now well known studies-reading about them again in a new context that expands their meaning and usefulness. I did appreciate his mention of Barbara Rolls' book (Volumetrics)-in fact I discuss that routinely in the group and individual classes I teach each month on weight control. The American Dietetic Association also agrees that her books that, rather than pointing to specific foods that can "cure" the reader's weight struggles, encourages a well balanced approach that can help gradually bring about slow weight loss and in general, healthful eating. How radical is that? What Mom said, what those women in white coats (Dietitians!) say that we have been avoiding all our lives, may have some validity. I know that "Mindless Eating" will only help those who are willing to let go of their disbelief that science knows a part of them better than they know themselves. This book is about human nature. This book is about how our lives many not really be our own, that forces around us(who have done their marketing research homework) manipulate us daily into doing their bidding. And we don't notice it. Everyone should read this book.
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(8 of 13 readers found this comment helpful)
Currer1013, March 22, 2007 (view all comments by Currer1013)
This book is nothing new. It focuses on "the obesity epidemic," a fear-mongering term that's frequently bandied about (and usually accompanied by photographs of fat bellied, headless torsos). Mostly, it's bad social science. It confuses correlation with causality, a freshman sociological mistake. Yes, there is a correlation between heart disease and obesity, but there's also a correlation between heart disease and living in an industrialized nation, your race, gender, etc. In fact, there is a higher correlation between heart disease and being UNDERweight than being overweight.

Wansink's book is another pseudo-sociology that Puritanizes food and weight and labels fat people as lazy, food obsessed, stupid slobs, just like every other stereotypical portrayal. For a better analysis, see Barry Glassner's The Gospel of Food or Paul Campos's The Obesity Myth.
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(20 of 48 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780553804348
Subtitle:
Why We Eat More Than We Think
Author:
Wansink, Brian
Author:
Brian Wansink, PhD
Author:
Wansink, Brian Phd
Publisher:
Bantam
Subject:
Nutrition
Subject:
Food habits
Subject:
Compulsive eating
Subject:
Food habits -- Psychological aspects.
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20061017
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.62x5.80x.91 in. .94 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Cooking and Food » Diet and Nutrition » General
Cooking and Food » Diet and Nutrition » Nutrition
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Nutrition
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Medicine Nutrition and Psychology

Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think Used Hardcover
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$5.95 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Bantam Books - English 9780553804348 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "According to Wansink, director of the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab, the mind makes food-related decisions, more than 200 a day, and many of them without pause for actual thought. This peppy, somewhat pop-psych book argues that we don't have to change what we eat as much as how, and that by making more mindful food-related decisions we can start to eat and live better. The author's approach isn't so much a diet book as a how-to on better facilitating the interaction between the feed-me messages of our stomachs and the controls in our heads. In their particulars, the research summaries are entertaining, like an experiment that measured how people ate when their plates were literally 'bottomless,' but the cumulative message and even the approach feels familiar and not especially fresh. Wansink examines popular diets like the South Beach and Atkins regimes, and offers a number of his own strategies to help focus on what you eat: at a dinner party, 'try to be the last person to start eating.' Whether readers take time to weigh their decisions and their fruits and vegetables remains to be seen." Publishers Weekly "(Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "According to Wansink, director of the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab, the mind makes food-related decisions, more than 200 a day, and many of them without pause for actual thought. This peppy, somewhat pop-psych book argues that we don't have to change what we eat as much as how, and that by making more mindful food-related decisions we can start to eat and live better. The author's approach isn't so much a diet book as a how-to on better facilitating the interaction between the feed-me messages of our stomachs and the controls in our heads. In their particulars, the research summaries are entertaining, like an experiment that measured how people ate when their plates were literally 'bottomless,' but the cumulative message and even the approach feels familiar and not especially fresh. Wansink examines popular diets like the South Beach and Atkins regimes, and offers a number of his own strategies to help focus on what you eat: at a dinner party, 'try to be the last person to start eating.' Whether readers take time to weigh their decisions and their fruits and vegetables remains to be seen." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Wansink's dual approach emphasizing food knowledge and self-knowledge offers a sensible route to permanent weight loss."
"Review" by , "[Mindless Eating] does more than just chastise those of us guilty of stuffing our faces. It also examines the effectiveness of such popular diets as South Beach or Atkins, and offers useful tips to consciously eat nutritiously."
"Synopsis" by , Brian Wansink, Ph.D., is an Iowa native and earned his doctorate at Stanford University. He is the John S. Dyson Professor of Marketing and of Nutritional Science at Cornell University, where he is Director of the Cornell Food and Brand Lab. The author of three profesional books on food and consumer behavior, he lives with his family in Ithaca, New York, where he enjoys both French food and French fries each week.
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