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Where Have All the Soldiers Gone?: The Transformation of Modern Europe

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Where Have All the Soldiers Gone?: The Transformation of Modern Europe Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

An eminent historian offers a sweeping look at Europe's tumultuous twentieth century, showing how the rejection of violence after World War II transformed a continent

In the last decade we've seen an ever-widening rift between the United States and Europe, most visibly over Iraq. But as James J. Sheehan reminds us in his timely book, it wasn't always thus. How did America and Europe come to take such different paths?

In Where Have All the Soldiers Gone? Stanford historian Sheehan charts what is perhaps the most radical shift in Europe's history. For centuries, nations defined themselves by their willingness and ability to wage war. But after World War II, Europe began to redefine statehood, rejecting ballooning defense budgets in favor of material well-being, social stability, and economic growth. Sheehan reveals how and why this happened, and what it means for America as well as the rest of the world.

Succinct yet broad in scope, Sheehan's authoritative history provides much-needed context for understanding the fractured era in which we live.

Review:

"After two cataclysmic wars, argues Stanford historian Sheehan, Europe has been transformed from a place where the state was defined by its capacity to make war into a group of 'civilian states' that have 'lost all interest' in making war. Rather, they are marked by a focus on economic growth, prosperity and personal security. To explore this transformation, Sheehan examines the changes in modern warfare and in its infrastructure and the mobilization of national economies for war. Sheehan looks at the impact in the early 20th century of universal conscription, including its social consequences (such as bringing together different social classes), and its eventual decline; the peace movements marked by the 1899 and 1907 Hague conferences; the effects of the Cold War; the growth of the European Union; and the Euro-American split over the Iraq war. Sheehan's style is clear and fluid, and his work is just the right length. Perhaps his only failing is to scant Europe's 'fitful and ineffective' interventions in the Balkans and more distant strife-torn countries, but this pales besides the information offered by this fine contribution to European studies." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"A strong case can be made that the salient fact about Western Europe today is not that it has overcome centuries of bitter animosity to reach near-unification or that it is moving steadily toward bringing Eastern Europe into its embrace, but that for more than six decades it has been at peace. In the first half of the 20th century it was torn nearly to extinction by the two most calamitous wars the... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopsis:

In this lively and ambitious book, James Sheehan charts what is perhaps the most radical shift in Europes history: its transformation from war-torn battlefield to peaceful, prosperous society. For centuries, war was Europes defining narrative, affecting every aspect of political, social, and cultural life. But afterWorldWar II, Europe began to reimagine statehood, rejecting ballooning defense budgets in favor of material well-being, social stability, and economic growth.

Where Have All the Soldiers Gone? reveals how and why this happened, and what it means for America and the rest of the world.

With remarkable insight and clarity, Sheehan covers the major intellectual and political events in Europe over the past one hundred years, from the pacifist and militarist movements of the early twentieth century and two catastrophic world wars to the fall of the BerlinWall and the heated debate over Iraq.This authoritative history provides much-needed context for understanding the fractured era in which we live.we live.

About the Author

'James Sheehan is a professor of history at Stanford University, and the author of several books on German history.'

Table of Contents

Prologue: War and Peace in the Twentieth Century xiii

Part I : Living in Peace, Preparing for War, 1900–1914 1. “Without War, There Would Be No State” 3 2. Pacifism and Militarism 22 3. Europeans in a Violent World 42

Part II: A World Made by War, 1914–1945 4. War and Revolution 69 5. The Twenty-Year Truce 92 6. The Last European War 119

Part III : States Without War 7. The Foundations of the Postwar World 147 8. The Rise of the Civilian State 172 9. Why Europe Will Not Become a Superpower 198

Epilogue: The Future of the Civilian State 222 Notes 231 Bibliography 245 Index 261

Product Details

ISBN:
9780618353965
Subtitle:
The Transformation of Modern Europe
Author:
Sheehan, James
Author:
Sheehan, James J.
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Location:
Boston
Subject:
History
Subject:
Europe - General
Subject:
Politics and war
Subject:
Modern - 20th Century
Subject:
Europe Economic conditions 1945-
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20080110
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
8 halftones
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8 x 5.31 in 0.62 lb

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Western Civilization » 20th Century

Where Have All the Soldiers Gone?: The Transformation of Modern Europe Used Hardcover
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Product details 304 pages Houghton Mifflin Company - English 9780618353965 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "After two cataclysmic wars, argues Stanford historian Sheehan, Europe has been transformed from a place where the state was defined by its capacity to make war into a group of 'civilian states' that have 'lost all interest' in making war. Rather, they are marked by a focus on economic growth, prosperity and personal security. To explore this transformation, Sheehan examines the changes in modern warfare and in its infrastructure and the mobilization of national economies for war. Sheehan looks at the impact in the early 20th century of universal conscription, including its social consequences (such as bringing together different social classes), and its eventual decline; the peace movements marked by the 1899 and 1907 Hague conferences; the effects of the Cold War; the growth of the European Union; and the Euro-American split over the Iraq war. Sheehan's style is clear and fluid, and his work is just the right length. Perhaps his only failing is to scant Europe's 'fitful and ineffective' interventions in the Balkans and more distant strife-torn countries, but this pales besides the information offered by this fine contribution to European studies." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
In this lively and ambitious book, James Sheehan charts what is perhaps the most radical shift in Europes history: its transformation from war-torn battlefield to peaceful, prosperous society. For centuries, war was Europes defining narrative, affecting every aspect of political, social, and cultural life. But afterWorldWar II, Europe began to reimagine statehood, rejecting ballooning defense budgets in favor of material well-being, social stability, and economic growth.

Where Have All the Soldiers Gone? reveals how and why this happened, and what it means for America and the rest of the world.

With remarkable insight and clarity, Sheehan covers the major intellectual and political events in Europe over the past one hundred years, from the pacifist and militarist movements of the early twentieth century and two catastrophic world wars to the fall of the BerlinWall and the heated debate over Iraq.This authoritative history provides much-needed context for understanding the fractured era in which we live.we live.

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