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1 Beaverton Self Help- Relationships

Committed: A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage

by

Committed: A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage Cover

ISBN13: 9780670021659
ISBN10: 0670021652
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Staff Pick

Elizabeth Gilbert has some explaining to do. After requiring a year-long sabbatical to recover from the tumultuous aftermath of her first marriage, she does the unthinkable: she gets married again. Don't panic! Gilbert can still write. Expect the voice and narrative style that made Eat, Pray, Love an international phenomenon.
Recommended by Martha, Powells.com

Review-A-Day

"Gilbert's new book, Committed: A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage, explores what happens after that, when the couple is faced with their worst nightmare. Cancer.

No, wait. I mean, marriage. (I knew it was something really bad.)" Chelsea Cain, The Oregonian (read the entire Oregonian review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

At the end of her bestselling memoir Eat, Pray, Love, Elizabeth Gilbert fell in love with Felipe, a Brazilian-born man of Australian citizenship who'd been living in Indonesia when they met. Resettling in America, the couple swore eternal fidelity to each other, but also swore to never, ever, under any circumstances get legally married. (Both were survivors of previous horrific divorces. Enough said.) But providence intervened one day in the form of the United States government, which — after unexpectedly detaining Felipe at an American border crossing — gave the couple a choice: they could either get married, or Felipe would never be allowed to enter the country again.

Having been effectively sentenced to wed, Gilbert tackled her fears of marriage by delving into this topic completely, trying with all her might to discover through historical research, interviews, and much personal reflection what this stubbornly enduring old institution actually is.

Told with Gilbert's trademark wit, intelligence and compassion, Committed attempts to "turn on all the lights" when it comes to matrimony, frankly examining questions of compatibility, infatuation, fidelity, family tradition, social expectations, divorce risks and humbling responsibilities. Gilbert's memoir is ultimately a clear-eyed celebration of love with all the complexity and consequence that real love, in the real world, actually entails.

Review:

"[Signature]Reviewed by Amy Sohn "How does an author follow up a smash international bestseller that has catapulted her from obscurity into fame and riches she never dreamed of? Very carefully. Committed: A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage, Elizabeth Gilbert's first book since the multimillion-selling Eat, Pray, Love, was written so carefully that it's actually her second attempt (she scrapped the first one after she decided the voice was wrong). The good news is her voice is clear and winning. The bad news is the structure doesn't work. Part history, part travelogue, Committed often makes for a jumpy read. Still, Gilbert remains the spirited storyteller she was in EPL, and her central question is a good one — how can a divorce-scarred feminist make a case for marriage?EPL ended in Bali with Gilbert falling in love with Felipe, a hot, older Brazilian divorcé. Book clubs across the country passionately debated her message: 'Is Gilbert saying I need a man to be happy?'; 'What if I go to Bali and don't meet the love of my life?'; and 'How did a woman who didn't want children land the only Latino hottie with a vasectomy in all of Indonesia?' In the year following their meeting, Felipe and Gilbert cobbled together a long-distance relationship; he would stay with her in the U.S. for 90-day jaunts, and the rest of the time they'd live apart or travel the world. One day in the spring of 2006, they returned to the Dallas Airport and Felipe was detained at the border. A customs agent said he could not enter the country again unless he married Gilbert.Gilbert spent the next year in exile with Felipe — straining the relationship — and did a lot of reading about marriage. In jaunty, ever-curious prose she tells us that today's Hmong women in Vietnam don't expect their husbands to be their best friends; that in modern Iran young couples can marry for a day; and that early Christians were actually against marriage, seeing it as antireligious. It's all fascinating stuff, but ultimately Gilbert is more interested in the history of divorce than marriage. The reader can feel both her excitement when she tells us that in medieval Germany there were two kinds of marriages, one more casual than the other, and her rage when she recounts the ill effects of the Church on divorce as it 'turned marriage into a life sentence.'For all of its academic ambition, the juiciest bits of Committed are the personal ones, when she tells us stories about her family. There's a great scene involving the way her grandfather scattered her grandmother's ashes, and a painfully funny story of a fight Gilbert and Felipe had on a 12-hour bus ride in Laos. The bus is bumpy, the travelers exhausted, and both feel the frustration of not being able to make a home together. They bicker, and she tries and fails at a couples-therapy technique, and a 'heated silence went on for a long time.' Later in the story, when she is hemming and hawing about the Meaning of It All, he says, 'When are you going to understand? As soon as we secure this bloody visa and get ourselves safely married back in America, we can do whatever the hell we want.' I am happy for Gilbert that she did a lot of research before tying the knot again, but she already did the most important thing a gun-shy bride can do: choose the right mate." Amy Sohn is the author of the novelProspect Park West: Hits and misses in the burgeoning genre of personal finance books targeting women. Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Presented in the author's easy-going, conversational style, the material is intriguing and often insightful....A vaguely depressing account of how intimate relationships are complicated by marriage, divorce and expectations about both." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"...[A]an irresistibly romantic tale spiked with unusual and resonant insights into love and marriage." Booklist

Synopsis:

Picking up where her bestselling memoir Eat, Pray, Love left off, Gilbert details the extraordinary circumstances that surround her love with Felipe, the man she swore never to marry. Told with Gilbert's trademark wit, Committed is a celebration of love with all the complexity and consequence that real love, in the real world, actually entails.

Synopsis:

At the end of her bestselling memoir Eat, Pray, Love, Elizabeth Gilbert fell in love with Felipe, a Brazilian-born man of Australian citizenship who'd been living in Indonesia when they met. Resettling in America, the couple swore eternal fidelity to each other, but also swore to never, ever, under any circumstances get legally married. (Both were survivors of previous bad divorces. Enough said.) But providence intervened one day in the form of the United States government, which-after unexpectedly detaining Felipe at an American border crossing-gave the couple a choice: they could either get married, or Felipe would never be allowed to enter the country again. Having been effectively sentenced to wed, Gilbert tackled her fears of marriage by delving into this topic completely, trying with all her might to discover through historical research, interviews, and much personal reflection what this stubbornly enduring old institution actually is. Told with Gilbert's trademark wit, intelligence and compassion, Committed attempts to "turn on all the lights" when it comes to matrimony, frankly examining questions of compatibility, infatuation, fidelity, family tradition, social expectations, divorce risks and humbling responsibilities. Gilbert's memoir is ultimately a clear-eyed celebration of love with all the complexity and consequence that real love, in the real world, actually entails.

Synopsis:

The #1 New York Times bestselling follow-up to Eat, Pray, Love--an intimate and erudite celebration of love.

At the end of her memoir Eat, Pray, Love, Elizabeth Gilbert fell in love with Felipe, a Brazilian living in Indonesia. The couple swore eternal love, but also swore (as skittish divorce survivors) never to marry. However, providence intervened in the form of a U.S. government ultimatum: get married, or Felipe could never enter America again. Told with Gilbert's trademark humor and intelligence, this fascinating meditation on compatibility and fidelity chronicles Gilbert's complex and sometimes frightening journey into second marriage, and will enthrall the millions of readers who made Eat, Pray, Love a number one bestseller.

About the Author

Elizabeth Gilbert is an award-winning writer of both fiction and non-fiction. Her short story collection Pilgrims was a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway award, and her novel Stern Men was a New York Times notable book. In 2002, she published The Last American Man, which was a finalist for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critic's Circle Award. She is best known for her 2006 memoir Eat, Pray, Love, which was published in more than thirty languages.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 4 comments:

BlossomingContradiction, January 3, 2011 (view all comments by BlossomingContradiction)
A truly compassionate, honest, witty and informative exploration of our western institution of marriage. Told with a sharp, critical eye toward herself and the dedicated investigative questioning of her journalistic background, Gilbert out does herself here in exploring the question of what makes us choose to be together and how can we remain happy. I laughed regularly, screamed at the historical context of some of the shocking truths of our legal system, and took a deeper look at my own relationship, as well as myself, to see how better to love each other. A thoroughly enjoyable story that invites you to take responsibility for your own values and align your life choices accordingly. LOVED IT.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Kelly A, May 25, 2010 (view all comments by Kelly A)
This is NOT "Eat, Pray, Love the Sequel" Thank God. I would be honored to be added to the list of 27 women Gilbert considered her readers for this book. After finishing it, much quicker than "Eat, Pray" I feel I just had a great conversation with a well-educated friend who is working on a really interesting research project. The tidbits of data are sprinkled throughout the main tale that served as the main thread of the book: the path to a life together with "the Brazillian."
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
gotopatsy, January 19, 2010 (view all comments by gotopatsy)
Elizabeth Gilbert is a true scholar. To read this book (and Eat Pray Love) is to learn so much; about history, about this brilliant women, about yourself. Her writing is a joy.
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(1 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 4 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780670021659
Author:
Gilbert, Elizabeth
Publisher:
Viking Books
Subject:
Marriage
Subject:
Wives -- United States.
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Biography - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
CD-Audio
Publication Date:
20100231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9.3 x 6.3 x 1.05 in 1.11 lb
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Biography » Women
Featured Titles » Staff Favorites
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Biographies
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Memoirs
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Relationships

Committed: A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Viking Books - English 9780670021659 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Elizabeth Gilbert has some explaining to do. After requiring a year-long sabbatical to recover from the tumultuous aftermath of her first marriage, she does the unthinkable: she gets married again. Don't panic! Gilbert can still write. Expect the voice and narrative style that made Eat, Pray, Love an international phenomenon.

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "[Signature]Reviewed by Amy Sohn "How does an author follow up a smash international bestseller that has catapulted her from obscurity into fame and riches she never dreamed of? Very carefully. Committed: A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage, Elizabeth Gilbert's first book since the multimillion-selling Eat, Pray, Love, was written so carefully that it's actually her second attempt (she scrapped the first one after she decided the voice was wrong). The good news is her voice is clear and winning. The bad news is the structure doesn't work. Part history, part travelogue, Committed often makes for a jumpy read. Still, Gilbert remains the spirited storyteller she was in EPL, and her central question is a good one — how can a divorce-scarred feminist make a case for marriage?EPL ended in Bali with Gilbert falling in love with Felipe, a hot, older Brazilian divorcé. Book clubs across the country passionately debated her message: 'Is Gilbert saying I need a man to be happy?'; 'What if I go to Bali and don't meet the love of my life?'; and 'How did a woman who didn't want children land the only Latino hottie with a vasectomy in all of Indonesia?' In the year following their meeting, Felipe and Gilbert cobbled together a long-distance relationship; he would stay with her in the U.S. for 90-day jaunts, and the rest of the time they'd live apart or travel the world. One day in the spring of 2006, they returned to the Dallas Airport and Felipe was detained at the border. A customs agent said he could not enter the country again unless he married Gilbert.Gilbert spent the next year in exile with Felipe — straining the relationship — and did a lot of reading about marriage. In jaunty, ever-curious prose she tells us that today's Hmong women in Vietnam don't expect their husbands to be their best friends; that in modern Iran young couples can marry for a day; and that early Christians were actually against marriage, seeing it as antireligious. It's all fascinating stuff, but ultimately Gilbert is more interested in the history of divorce than marriage. The reader can feel both her excitement when she tells us that in medieval Germany there were two kinds of marriages, one more casual than the other, and her rage when she recounts the ill effects of the Church on divorce as it 'turned marriage into a life sentence.'For all of its academic ambition, the juiciest bits of Committed are the personal ones, when she tells us stories about her family. There's a great scene involving the way her grandfather scattered her grandmother's ashes, and a painfully funny story of a fight Gilbert and Felipe had on a 12-hour bus ride in Laos. The bus is bumpy, the travelers exhausted, and both feel the frustration of not being able to make a home together. They bicker, and she tries and fails at a couples-therapy technique, and a 'heated silence went on for a long time.' Later in the story, when she is hemming and hawing about the Meaning of It All, he says, 'When are you going to understand? As soon as we secure this bloody visa and get ourselves safely married back in America, we can do whatever the hell we want.' I am happy for Gilbert that she did a lot of research before tying the knot again, but she already did the most important thing a gun-shy bride can do: choose the right mate." Amy Sohn is the author of the novelProspect Park West: Hits and misses in the burgeoning genre of personal finance books targeting women. Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "Gilbert's new book, Committed: A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage, explores what happens after that, when the couple is faced with their worst nightmare. Cancer.

No, wait. I mean, marriage. (I knew it was something really bad.)" Chelsea Cain, The Oregonian (read the entire Oregonian review)

"Review" by , "Presented in the author's easy-going, conversational style, the material is intriguing and often insightful....A vaguely depressing account of how intimate relationships are complicated by marriage, divorce and expectations about both."
"Review" by , "...[A]an irresistibly romantic tale spiked with unusual and resonant insights into love and marriage."
"Synopsis" by , Picking up where her bestselling memoir Eat, Pray, Love left off, Gilbert details the extraordinary circumstances that surround her love with Felipe, the man she swore never to marry. Told with Gilbert's trademark wit, Committed is a celebration of love with all the complexity and consequence that real love, in the real world, actually entails.
"Synopsis" by ,

At the end of her bestselling memoir Eat, Pray, Love, Elizabeth Gilbert fell in love with Felipe, a Brazilian-born man of Australian citizenship who'd been living in Indonesia when they met. Resettling in America, the couple swore eternal fidelity to each other, but also swore to never, ever, under any circumstances get legally married. (Both were survivors of previous bad divorces. Enough said.) But providence intervened one day in the form of the United States government, which-after unexpectedly detaining Felipe at an American border crossing-gave the couple a choice: they could either get married, or Felipe would never be allowed to enter the country again. Having been effectively sentenced to wed, Gilbert tackled her fears of marriage by delving into this topic completely, trying with all her might to discover through historical research, interviews, and much personal reflection what this stubbornly enduring old institution actually is. Told with Gilbert's trademark wit, intelligence and compassion, Committed attempts to "turn on all the lights" when it comes to matrimony, frankly examining questions of compatibility, infatuation, fidelity, family tradition, social expectations, divorce risks and humbling responsibilities. Gilbert's memoir is ultimately a clear-eyed celebration of love with all the complexity and consequence that real love, in the real world, actually entails.

"Synopsis" by ,
The #1 New York Times bestselling follow-up to Eat, Pray, Love--an intimate and erudite celebration of love.

At the end of her memoir Eat, Pray, Love, Elizabeth Gilbert fell in love with Felipe, a Brazilian living in Indonesia. The couple swore eternal love, but also swore (as skittish divorce survivors) never to marry. However, providence intervened in the form of a U.S. government ultimatum: get married, or Felipe could never enter America again. Told with Gilbert's trademark humor and intelligence, this fascinating meditation on compatibility and fidelity chronicles Gilbert's complex and sometimes frightening journey into second marriage, and will enthrall the millions of readers who made Eat, Pray, Love a number one bestseller.

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