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The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears (Library of American Indian History)

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The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears (Library of American Indian History) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Today, a fraction of the Cherokee people remains in their traditional homeland in the southern Appalachians. Most Cherokees were forcibly relocated to eastern Oklahoma in the early nineteenth century. In 1830 the U.S. government shifted its policy from one of trying to assimilate American Indians to one of relocating them and proceeded to drive seventeen thousand Cherokee people west of the Mississippi.

The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears recounts this moment in American history and considers its impact on the Cherokee, on U.S.-Indian relations, and on contemporary society. Guggenheim Fellowship-winning historian Theda Perdue and coauthor Michael D. Green explain the various and sometimes competing interests that resulted in the Cherokee?s expulsion, follow the exiles along the Trail of Tears, and chronicle their difficult years in the West after removal.

Review:

"'This compact book by eminent historians Perdue and Green moves from the time when all Cherokees 'lived in the southern Appalachians' to their forced expulsion to the Indian Territory, as American policy morphed from 'civilizing' Native Americans to what might today be deemed ethnic cleansing. The Indian Removal Act (1830) fixed in law 'a revolutionary program of political and social engineering that caused unimaginable suffering, deaths in the thousands, and emotional pain that lingers to this day.' It's a tangled tale of partisan politics and Cherokee power struggles, of juridical argument and economic motive, of bitter personal disputes and changing public policy. Perdue (Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southeast) and Green (The Cherokee Removal) have written a lucid, readable account of the legal complexities of the 18th-century 'right of conquest doctrine' and the 19th-century 'emerging doctrine of state rights'; the treaties, alliances, obligations and assurances involved; and the landmark cases Cherokee v. Georgia and Worcester v. Georgia (one effectively denying Cherokee self-government, one ineffectively affirming Cherokee sovereignty). Over it all hangs the disquieting knowledge that in the history of interaction between Euro-Americans and Indians, Cherokee removal '[exemplifies] a larger history that no one should forget.' (July)' Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

In the early nineteenth century, the U.S. government shifted its policy from trying to assimilate American Indians to relocating them, and proceeded to forcibly drive seventeen thousand Cherokees from their homelands. This journey of exile became known as the Trail of Tears.

Historians Perdue and Green reveal the government?s betrayals and the divisions within the Cherokee Nation, follow the exiles along the Trail of Tears, and chronicle the hardships found in the West. In its trauma and tragedy, the Cherokee diaspora has come to represent the irreparable injustice done to Native Americans in the name of nation building?and in their determined survival, it represents the resilience of the Native American spirit.

Synopsis:

In the 1830s, the U.S. government proceeded to drive the Cherokee people west of the Mississippi. Recounting this moment in American history, the authors consider its impact on the Cherokee, on U.S.-Indian relations, and on contemporary society.

About the Author

Theda Perdue, Ph.D. is a professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and recent winner of a Guggenheim Fellowship. Her previous books include Cherokee Women and Sifters.

Michael D. Green, Ph.D. is a professor of history and American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and author of The Politics of Indian Removal.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780670031504
Subtitle:
The Penguin Library of American Indian History series
Author:
Perdue, Theda
Editor:
Calloway, Colin
Author:
Calloway, Colin G.
Author:
Green, Michael
Author:
Calloway, Colin
Publisher:
Viking Adult
Subject:
Native American
Subject:
United States - Antebellum Era
Subject:
History
Subject:
Cherokee Indians
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - Native American Studies - Tribes
Subject:
Cherokee Indians -- Relocation.
Subject:
Trail of Tears, 1838-1839
Subject:
Native American-General Native American Studies
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardback
Series:
Penguin's Library of American Indian History
Publication Date:
20070705
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
b/w illustrations throughout; b/w map
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
7.58x5.52x.78 in. .62 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Native American » General Native American Studies
History and Social Science » Native American » Southeast
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century

The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears (Library of American Indian History) Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 208 pages Viking Books - English 9780670031504 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "'This compact book by eminent historians Perdue and Green moves from the time when all Cherokees 'lived in the southern Appalachians' to their forced expulsion to the Indian Territory, as American policy morphed from 'civilizing' Native Americans to what might today be deemed ethnic cleansing. The Indian Removal Act (1830) fixed in law 'a revolutionary program of political and social engineering that caused unimaginable suffering, deaths in the thousands, and emotional pain that lingers to this day.' It's a tangled tale of partisan politics and Cherokee power struggles, of juridical argument and economic motive, of bitter personal disputes and changing public policy. Perdue (Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southeast) and Green (The Cherokee Removal) have written a lucid, readable account of the legal complexities of the 18th-century 'right of conquest doctrine' and the 19th-century 'emerging doctrine of state rights'; the treaties, alliances, obligations and assurances involved; and the landmark cases Cherokee v. Georgia and Worcester v. Georgia (one effectively denying Cherokee self-government, one ineffectively affirming Cherokee sovereignty). Over it all hangs the disquieting knowledge that in the history of interaction between Euro-Americans and Indians, Cherokee removal '[exemplifies] a larger history that no one should forget.' (July)' Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
In the early nineteenth century, the U.S. government shifted its policy from trying to assimilate American Indians to relocating them, and proceeded to forcibly drive seventeen thousand Cherokees from their homelands. This journey of exile became known as the Trail of Tears.

Historians Perdue and Green reveal the government?s betrayals and the divisions within the Cherokee Nation, follow the exiles along the Trail of Tears, and chronicle the hardships found in the West. In its trauma and tragedy, the Cherokee diaspora has come to represent the irreparable injustice done to Native Americans in the name of nation building?and in their determined survival, it represents the resilience of the Native American spirit.

"Synopsis" by , In the 1830s, the U.S. government proceeded to drive the Cherokee people west of the Mississippi. Recounting this moment in American history, the authors consider its impact on the Cherokee, on U.S.-Indian relations, and on contemporary society.
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