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We Shall Be No More: Suicide and Self-Government in the Newly United States

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We Shall Be No More: Suicide and Self-Government in the Newly United States Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Suicide is a quintessentially individual act, yet one with unexpectedly broad social implications. Though seen today as a private phenomenon, in the uncertain aftermath of the American Revolution this personal act seemed to many to be a public threat that held no less than the fate of the fledgling Republic in its grip.

Salacious novelists and eager newspapermen broadcast images of a young nation rapidly destroying itself. Parents, physicians, ministers, and magistrates debated the meaning of self-destruction and whether it could (or should) be prevented. Jailers and justice officials rushed to thwart condemned prisoners who made halters from bedsheets, while abolitionists used slave suicides as testimony to both the ravages of the peculiar institution and the humanity of its victims. Struggling to create a viable political community out of extraordinary national turmoil, these interest groups invoked self-murder as a means to confront the most consequential questions facing the newly united states: What is the appropriate balance between individual liberty and social order? Who owns the self? And how far should the control of the state (or the church, or a husband, or a master) extend over the individual?

With visceral prose and an abundance of evocative primary sources, Richard Bell lays bare the ways in which self-destruction in early America was perceived as a transgressive challenge to embodied authority, a portent of both danger and possibility. His unique study of suicide between the Revolution and Reconstruction uncovers what was at stake--personally and politically--in the nation's fraught first decades.

Book News Annotation:

The subject of suicide is more often treated by psychologists, sociologists, and philosophers; but Bell is a historian (U. of Maryland), and this intriguing study explores suicide in the context of the early republic. In clear and engaging prose, the author examines public and media attention to suicide occurrences, the rhetoric of self destruction and its infusion into national debate, and how perceptions of suicide reflected fears and struggles in the new nation. Annotation ©2012 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Though suicide is an individual act, Richard Bell reveals its broad social implications in early America. From Revolution to Reconstruction, everyone--parents, newspapermen, ministers and abolitionists alike--debated the meaning of suicide as a portent of danger or of possibility in a new nation struggling to define itself and its power.

Synopsis:

and#147;Suicide,and#8221; writes Terri Snyder, and#147;is central to the history of slavery in early America,and#8221; and slave suicide is itself central to the history of suicide. Snyder digs deep into horrifying contemporary accounts, exploring when and why captured Africans chose suicide, how their captors chose to respond, and the roles of class and status in early American suicides more generally. Over the course of the slavery era, Snyder finds, American society developed a new ambivalence about suicide. The harsh treatment of suicides lessened in the white populationand#151;bodies were no longer desecrated, forfeiture was not enforcedand#151;while on plantations the question of whether dead slaves were primarily property or people heightened awareness of slaveryand#8217;s contradictions and cruelties. Snyder shows how slave suicide pressured slave society to change not only its attitudes toward slaves but its approach toward suicide in all its forms.

About the Author

Richard Bell is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Maryland.

University of Maryland

Product Details

ISBN:
9780674063723
Author:
Bell, Richard
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Author:
Bell
Author:
Richard
Author:
Snyder, Terri L.
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
Sociology-Suicide
Subject:
History - United States/19th Century
Subject:
Psychology-Suicide
Subject:
HISTORY / Social History
Subject:
United States / Colonial Period(1600-1775)
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20120320
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
20 halftones
Pages:
344
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Suicide
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century
History and Social Science » US History » General
History and Social Science » US History » Revolution and Constitution Era
History and Social Science » World History » General
Humanities » Philosophy » General

We Shall Be No More: Suicide and Self-Government in the Newly United States New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$47.95 In Stock
Product details 344 pages Harvard University Press - English 9780674063723 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Though suicide is an individual act, Richard Bell reveals its broad social implications in early America. From Revolution to Reconstruction, everyone--parents, newspapermen, ministers and abolitionists alike--debated the meaning of suicide as a portent of danger or of possibility in a new nation struggling to define itself and its power.
"Synopsis" by ,
and#147;Suicide,and#8221; writes Terri Snyder, and#147;is central to the history of slavery in early America,and#8221; and slave suicide is itself central to the history of suicide. Snyder digs deep into horrifying contemporary accounts, exploring when and why captured Africans chose suicide, how their captors chose to respond, and the roles of class and status in early American suicides more generally. Over the course of the slavery era, Snyder finds, American society developed a new ambivalence about suicide. The harsh treatment of suicides lessened in the white populationand#151;bodies were no longer desecrated, forfeiture was not enforcedand#151;while on plantations the question of whether dead slaves were primarily property or people heightened awareness of slaveryand#8217;s contradictions and cruelties. Snyder shows how slave suicide pressured slave society to change not only its attitudes toward slaves but its approach toward suicide in all its forms.
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