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1 Local Warehouse Biology- Evolution

This title in other editions

Monad to Man: The Concept of Progress in Evolutionary Biology

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Monad to Man: The Concept of Progress in Evolutionary Biology Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The idea of evolution: it fascinates some of us, disturbs others, and leaves only a very few people indifferent. In a major new interpretation of evolutionary theory, Michael Ruse pinpoints the common source of this attraction and discomfort. A renowned writer on evolutionary theory and its history, Ruse has long been sensitive to the fact that many people--and not simply religious enthusiasts--find something deeply troubling about much of what passes for science in evolutionary circles. What causes this tension, he finds in his search of evolutionism's 250-year history, is the intimate relationship between evolution and the secular ideology of progress.

Ubiquitous in Darwin's time, the idea of an unceasing improvement in life insinuated its way into evolutionary theory from the first. In interviews with today's major figures in evolutionary biology--including Stephen Jay Gould, Edward O. Wilson, Ernst Mayr, and John Maynard Smith--and in an intimate look at the discoveries and advances in the history and philosophy of science, Ruse finds this belief just as prevalent today--however it might be denied or obscured. His book traces the delicate line between those who argue that science is and must be objective and those who deem science a "social construction" in the fashion of religion or the rest of culture. It offers an unparalleled account of evolutionary theory, from popular books to museums to the most complex theorizing, at a time when its status as science is under greater scrutiny than ever before.

Book News Annotation:

Ruse (philosophy and zoology, U. of Guelph, Ontario) provides an intimate look at the relationship between evolutionary theory and the secular ideology of progress, a notion of unceasing improvement in life which has insinuated its way into evolutionary theory since Darwin's time.
Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

The idea of evolution: it fascinates some of us, disturbs others, and leaves only a very few people indifferent. In a major new interpretation of evolutionary theory, Michael Ruse pinpoints the common source of this attraction and discomfort. A renowned writer on evolutionary theory and its history, Ruse has long been sensitive to the fact that many people--and not simply religious enthusiasts--find something deeply troubling about much of what passes for science in evolutionary circles. What causes this tension, he finds in his search of evolutionism's 250-year history, is the intimate relationship between evolution and the secular ideology of progress.

Ubiquitous in Darwin's time, the idea of an unceasing improvement in life insinuated its way into evolutionary theory from the first. In interviews with today's major figures in evolutionary biology--including Stephen Jay Gould, Edward O. Wilson, Ernst Mayr, and John Maynard Smith--and in an intimate look at the discoveries and advances in the history and philosophy of science, Ruse finds this belief just as prevalent today--however it might be denied or obscured. His book traces the delicate line between those who argue that science is and must be objective and those who deem science a "social construction" in the fashion of religion or the rest of culture. It offers an unparalleled account of evolutionary theory, from popular books to museums to the most complex theorizing, at a time when its status as science is under greater scrutiny than ever before.

About the Author

Michael Ruse is Lucyle T. Werkmeister Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Program in the History and Philosophy of Science, Florida State University. He is the founder and editor of the journal Biology and Philosophy, and has appeared on “Quirks and Quarks” and the Discovery Channel.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

1. Progress and Culture

2. The Birth of Evolutionism

3. The Nineteenth Century: From Cuvier to Owen

4. Charles Darwin and Progress

5. Evolution as World View

6. The Professional Biologist

7. Evolution Travels West

8. British Evolutionists and Mendelian Genetics

9. Discipline Building in Britain

10. The Genetics of Populations

11. The Synthesis

12. Professional Evolutionism

13. Contemporary Debates

14. Conclusion

Notes

Bibliography

Credits

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780674582200
Author:
Ruse, Michael
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Location:
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Subject:
Philosophy
Subject:
General science
Subject:
History
Subject:
Evolution
Subject:
Evolution (Biology) -- History.
Subject:
Life Sciences - Evolution
Copyright:
Series Volume:
SP-520
Publication Date:
19970101
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
57 halftones, 41 line illustrations, 1 t
Pages:
648
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.375 in 2.28 lb

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Related Subjects

Science and Mathematics » Biology » Evolution

Monad to Man: The Concept of Progress in Evolutionary Biology Used Hardcover
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Product details 648 pages Harvard University Press - English 9780674582200 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The idea of evolution: it fascinates some of us, disturbs others, and leaves only a very few people indifferent. In a major new interpretation of evolutionary theory, Michael Ruse pinpoints the common source of this attraction and discomfort. A renowned writer on evolutionary theory and its history, Ruse has long been sensitive to the fact that many people--and not simply religious enthusiasts--find something deeply troubling about much of what passes for science in evolutionary circles. What causes this tension, he finds in his search of evolutionism's 250-year history, is the intimate relationship between evolution and the secular ideology of progress.

Ubiquitous in Darwin's time, the idea of an unceasing improvement in life insinuated its way into evolutionary theory from the first. In interviews with today's major figures in evolutionary biology--including Stephen Jay Gould, Edward O. Wilson, Ernst Mayr, and John Maynard Smith--and in an intimate look at the discoveries and advances in the history and philosophy of science, Ruse finds this belief just as prevalent today--however it might be denied or obscured. His book traces the delicate line between those who argue that science is and must be objective and those who deem science a "social construction" in the fashion of religion or the rest of culture. It offers an unparalleled account of evolutionary theory, from popular books to museums to the most complex theorizing, at a time when its status as science is under greater scrutiny than ever before.

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