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1 Local Warehouse International Studies- Human Rights

Bed for the Night Humanitarianism in Cri

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Bed for the Night Humanitarianism in Cri Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Timely and controversial, A Bed for the Night reveals how humanitarian organizations trying to bring relief in an ever more violent and dangerous world are often betrayed and misused, and have increasingly lost sight of their purpose.

Humanitarian relief workers, writes David Rieff, are the last of the just. And in the Bosnias, the Rwandas, and the Afghanistans of this world, humanitarianism remains the vocation of helping people when they most desperately need help, when they have lost or stand at risk of losing everything they have, including their lives.

Although humanitarianism's accomplishments have been tremendous, including saving countless lives, the lesson of the past ten years of civil wars and ethnic cleansing is that it can do only so much to alleviate suffering. Aid workers have discovered that while trying to do good, their efforts may also cause harm.

Drawing on firsthand reporting from hot war zones around the world — Bosnia, Rwanda, Congo, Kosovo, Sudan, and most recently Afghanistan — Rieff describes how the International Committee of the Red Cross, Doctors Without Borders, the International Rescue Committee, CARE, Oxfam, and other humanitarian organizations have moved from their founding principle of political neutrality, which gave them access to victims of wars, to encouraging the international community to take action to stop civil wars and ethnic cleansing.

This advocacy has come at a high price. By calling for intervention — whether by the United Nations or by "coalitions of the willing" — humanitarian organizations risk being seen as taking sides in a conflict and thus jeopardizing their access to victims. And by overreaching, the humanitarian movement has allowed itself to be hijacked by the major powers, at times becoming a fig leaf for actions those powers wish to take for their own interests, or for the major powers' inaction. Rieff concludes that if humanitarian organizations are to do what they do best — alleviate suffering — they must reclaim their independence.

Except for relief workers themselves, no one has looked at humanitarian action as seriously or as unflinchingly, or has had such unparalleled access to its inner workings, as Rieff, who has traveled and lived with aid workers over many years and four continents.

A cogent, hard-hitting report from the front lines, A Bed for the Night shows what international aid organizations must do if they are to continue to care for the victims of humanitarian disasters.

Review:

"Getting to the crux of his disheartening argument, Rieff contends that too often both the donors to many of the organizations he cites and those who carry out their missions respond viscerally and emotionally with hardly a clue to what is really going on. He uses Rwanda as a prime example. There, he notes, thousands of Rwandan murderers crossed the border and became refugees and the beneficiaries of all sorts of aid. He draws a harsh analogy in indicating that former Nazis were also accorded refugee status and given assistance in Paraguay and Argentina after World War II. Rieff devotes entire chapters to three other recent cases: Bosnia, Kosovo, and Afghanistan.

Throughout the pages of A Bed for a Night, David Rieff echoes the sentiments of the former UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Sadako Ogata, who, after years of trying to provide protection and assistance to refugees, concluded: 'There are no humanitarian solutions to humanitarian problems." There are only political ones.'" Peter I. Rose, The Christian Science Monitor (read the entire CSM review)

About the Author

David Rieff is the author of five books, including the acclaimed Slaughterhouse: Bosnia and the Failure of the West. He continues to cover wars and humanitarian emergencies in many parts of the world. He lives in New York City.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780684809779
Subtitle:
Humanitarianism in Crisis
Author:
Rieff, David
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Location:
New York, N.Y.
Subject:
General
Subject:
History
Subject:
International
Subject:
Social Services & Welfare
Subject:
International agencies
Subject:
Philanthropy & Charity
Subject:
Humanitarianism
Subject:
International relief
Subject:
War relief.
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
General Current Events
Copyright:
Series Volume:
88-752.
Publication Date:
20021001
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.125 in 21.520 oz

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » Human Rights

Bed for the Night Humanitarianism in Cri Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$2.95 In Stock
Product details 384 pages SIMON & SCHUSTER TRADE - English 9780684809779 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Getting to the crux of his disheartening argument, Rieff contends that too often both the donors to many of the organizations he cites and those who carry out their missions respond viscerally and emotionally with hardly a clue to what is really going on. He uses Rwanda as a prime example. There, he notes, thousands of Rwandan murderers crossed the border and became refugees and the beneficiaries of all sorts of aid. He draws a harsh analogy in indicating that former Nazis were also accorded refugee status and given assistance in Paraguay and Argentina after World War II. Rieff devotes entire chapters to three other recent cases: Bosnia, Kosovo, and Afghanistan.

Throughout the pages of A Bed for a Night, David Rieff echoes the sentiments of the former UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Sadako Ogata, who, after years of trying to provide protection and assistance to refugees, concluded: 'There are no humanitarian solutions to humanitarian problems." There are only political ones.'" Peter I. Rose, The Christian Science Monitor (read the entire CSM review)

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