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Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How It Changed America

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Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How It Changed America Cover

ISBN13: 9780684840024
ISBN10: 0684840022
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

 

Staff Pick

"An account of the Mississippi flood of 1927 and how it changed America. When the river flooded, it was possible to travel in a boat, east to west in the South, two hundred miles. The book is an account of how engineers had tried to control the Mississippi for the preceding hundred years and the conflicting theories about how to do that, the attempts and relative success prior to 1927, and how those attempts failed ultimately in '27. The subsequent flooding produced the worst national disaster in American history, resulting in an unknown number of deaths, assumed to be in the thousands. Barry explains how it affected the economic, social, and political environment of the Deep South, predominantly the Delta area. The novelist Walker Percy's family was a dominant force in the Delta at the time, and that's another storyline here — how that powerful family dealt with the flood and the rising power of the Ku Klux Klan. So the book, by talking about the flood, also deals with the politics of the region, immigration, race, its impact on the cotton industry, and ultimately how it made Herbert Hoover President and Huey Long Governor of Louisiana."
Recommended by Michael P, Powells.com

"An account of the Mississippi flood of 1927 and how it changed America. When the river flooded, it was possible to travel in a boat, east to west in the South, two hundred miles. The book is an account of how engineers had tried to control the Mississippi for the preceding hundred years and the conflicting theories about how to do that, the attempts and relative success prior to 1927, and how those attempts failed ultimately in '27. The subsequent flooding produced the worst national disaster in American history, resulting in an unknown number of deaths, assumed to be in the thousands. Barry explains how it affected the economic, social, and political environment of the Deep South, predominantly the Delta area. The novelist Walker Percy's family was a dominant force in the Delta at the time, and that's another storyline here — how that powerful family dealt with the flood and the rising power of the Ku Klux Klan. So the book, by talking about the flood, also deals with the politics of the region, immigration, race, its impact on the cotton industry, and ultimately how it made Herbert Hoover President and Huey Long Governor of Louisiana."
Recommended by Malia, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

From Powells.com:

In Rising Tide, John Barry chronicles the events that precipitated and resulted from the Mississippi flood of 1927, starting with the engineers and committees who battled greedily — and ultimately foolishly — to master North America's mightiest river. The flood represented the greatest natural disaster America had ever known; water claimed the lives of over 1,000 people and the homes of nearly one million, exposing racism, greed, power politics, and bureaucratic incompetence at every turn while simultaneously creating national heroes and lasting social change throughout the Deep South. Hundreds of thousands of African Americans were packed into squalid refugee camps and many more migrated north and west as the myths of friendly feudal plantation and sharecropping dissolved behind them. Southern plantation aristocracy was wiped out and a new elite was created. The Ku Klux Klan rose in power.

Barry's account of the 1927 flood provides a widely-acclaimed exploration of the reshaping of American culture, economy and politics. Powell's own Michael Powell calls Rising Tide his favorite among his Staff Picks. The book is also the winner of the Francis Parkman Prize, the Southern Book Critics Circle Award, the Lilian Smith Award, and has been named a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. Malia, Powells.com

Publisher Comments:

An American epic of science, politics, race, honor, high society, and the Mississippi River, Rising Tide tells the riveting and nearly forgotten story of the greatest natural disaster this country has ever known — the Mississippi flood of 1927. The river inundated the homes of nearly one million people, helped elect Huey Long governor and made Herbert Hoover president, drove hundreds of thousands of blacks north, and transformed American society and politics forever.

A New York Times Notable Book of the Year, winner of the Southern Book Critics Circle Award and the Lillian Smith Award.

Review:

"A gripping account of the mammoth flooding of 1927 that devastated Mississippi and Louisiana and sent political shock waves to Washington...Rising Tide is a brilliant match of scholarship and investigative journalism." Jason Berry, Chicago Tribune

Review:

"Barry clearly traces and analyzes how the changes produced by the flood in the lower South came into conflict and ultimately destroyed the old planter aristocracy...and foreshadowed federal government intervention in the region's social and economic life during the New Deal." Library Journal

Review:

"[I]mplicates both the Mississippi River and the South in a deeper, darker side of the American experience....[The book reminds] us that Americans are just beginning to comprehend the power of their geography." John Opie, Mississippi Quarterly

About the Author

John M. Barry is the author of The Great Influenza and The Ambition and the Power: A True Story of Washington, and co-author of The Transformed Cell, which has been published in twelve languages. As Washington editor of Dunn's Review, he covered national politics, and he has also written for The New York Times Magazine, Esquire, Newsweek, The Washington Post, and Sports Illustrated. He lives in New Orleans and Washington, D.C.

Table of Contents

Contents

Prologue 13

Part One: THE ENGINEERS 19

Chapter One 21

Chapter Two 32

Chapter Three 46

Chapter Four 55

Chapter Five 67

Chapter Six 78

Part Two: SENATOR PERCY 93

Chapter Seven 95

Chapter Eight 107

Chapter Nine 122

Chapter Ten 132

Chapter Eleven 143

Chapter Twelve 156

Part Three: THE RIVER 169

Chapter Thirteen 173

Chapter Fourteen 179

Chapter Fifteen 190

Chapter Sixteen 202

Part Four: THE CLUB 211

Chapter Seventeen 213

Chapter Eighteen 222

Chapter Nineteen 234

Chapter Twenty 245

Part Five: THE GREAT HUMANITARIAN 259

Chapter Twenty-One 261

Chapter Twenty-Two 272

Chapter Twenty-Three 282

Part Six: THE SON 291

Chapter Twenty-Four 293

Chapter Twenty-Five 303

Chapter Twenty-Six 318

Chapter Twenty-Seven 324

Part Seven: THE CLUB 337

Chapter Twenty-Eight 339

Chapter Twenty-Nine 344

Chapter Thirty 352

Part Eight: THE GREAT HUMANITARIAN 361

Chapter Thirty-One 363

Chapter Thirty-TwO 378

Chapter Thirty-Three 387

Part Nine: THE LEAVING OF THE WATERS 397

Chapter Thirty-Four 399

Chapter Thirty-Five 412

Appendix:

The River Today 423

Notes 427

Bibliography 481

Acknowledgments and Methodology 497

Index 501

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

saintangelfire, March 12, 2008 (view all comments by saintangelfire)
Have not yet read the book, was looking it up on the internet when I found this sight. After watching "How weather changed History" on t.v., which documented the Great Flood of the Mississippi (1927) I have become intrigued by the similarities of Huricane Katrina disaster relief and that of how this disaster of the past was handled.

Look forward to reading this book. Thanks!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(5 of 7 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780684840024
Author:
Barry, John M.
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Author:
Barry, John M.
Subject:
History
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
United States - State & Local
Subject:
African American Studies
Subject:
Natural Disasters
Subject:
United States - 20th Century/20s
Subject:
Floods
Subject:
Mississippi river valley
Subject:
United States - State & Local - General
Subject:
United States - State & Local - South
Subject:
Percy family
Subject:
Eads, James Buchanan
Subject:
US History - 20th Century
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1
Edition Description:
B102
Publication Date:
April 1998
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
528
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.12 in 20.3 oz

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Related Subjects


Featured Titles » History and Social Science
History and Social Science » Americana » Southern States
History and Social Science » US History » 1800 to 1945
History and Social Science » US History » 1920 to 1960
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
Science and Mathematics » Physics » Meteorology

Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How It Changed America Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.95 In Stock
Product details 528 pages Simon & Schuster - English 9780684840024 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

"An account of the Mississippi flood of 1927 and how it changed America. When the river flooded, it was possible to travel in a boat, east to west in the South, two hundred miles. The book is an account of how engineers had tried to control the Mississippi for the preceding hundred years and the conflicting theories about how to do that, the attempts and relative success prior to 1927, and how those attempts failed ultimately in '27. The subsequent flooding produced the worst national disaster in American history, resulting in an unknown number of deaths, assumed to be in the thousands. Barry explains how it affected the economic, social, and political environment of the Deep South, predominantly the Delta area. The novelist Walker Percy's family was a dominant force in the Delta at the time, and that's another storyline here — how that powerful family dealt with the flood and the rising power of the Ku Klux Klan. So the book, by talking about the flood, also deals with the politics of the region, immigration, race, its impact on the cotton industry, and ultimately how it made Herbert Hoover President and Huey Long Governor of Louisiana."

"Staff Pick" by ,

"An account of the Mississippi flood of 1927 and how it changed America. When the river flooded, it was possible to travel in a boat, east to west in the South, two hundred miles. The book is an account of how engineers had tried to control the Mississippi for the preceding hundred years and the conflicting theories about how to do that, the attempts and relative success prior to 1927, and how those attempts failed ultimately in '27. The subsequent flooding produced the worst national disaster in American history, resulting in an unknown number of deaths, assumed to be in the thousands. Barry explains how it affected the economic, social, and political environment of the Deep South, predominantly the Delta area. The novelist Walker Percy's family was a dominant force in the Delta at the time, and that's another storyline here — how that powerful family dealt with the flood and the rising power of the Ku Klux Klan. So the book, by talking about the flood, also deals with the politics of the region, immigration, race, its impact on the cotton industry, and ultimately how it made Herbert Hoover President and Huey Long Governor of Louisiana."

"Review" by , "A gripping account of the mammoth flooding of 1927 that devastated Mississippi and Louisiana and sent political shock waves to Washington...Rising Tide is a brilliant match of scholarship and investigative journalism."
"Review" by , "Barry clearly traces and analyzes how the changes produced by the flood in the lower South came into conflict and ultimately destroyed the old planter aristocracy...and foreshadowed federal government intervention in the region's social and economic life during the New Deal."
"Review" by , "[I]mplicates both the Mississippi River and the South in a deeper, darker side of the American experience....[The book reminds] us that Americans are just beginning to comprehend the power of their geography."
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