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Republic.com

Republic.com Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

See only what you want to see, hear only what you want to hear, read only what you want to read. In cyberspace, we already have the ability to filter out everything but what we wish to see, hear, and read. Tomorrow, our power to filter promises to increase exponentially. With the advent of the Daily Me, you see only the sports highlights that concern your teams, read about only the issues that interest you, encounter in the op-ed pages only the opinions with which you agree. In all of the applause for this remarkable ascendance of personalized information, Cass Sunstein asks the questions, Is it good for democracy? Is it healthy for the republic? What does this mean for freedom of speech?

Republic.com exposes the drawbacks of egocentric Internet use, while showing us how to approach the Internet as responsible citizens, not just concerned consumers. Democracy, Sunstein maintains, depends on shared experiences and requires citizens to be exposed to topics and ideas that they would not have chosen in advance. Newspapers and broadcasters helped create a shared culture, but as their role diminishes and the customization of our communications universe increases, society is in danger of fragmenting, shared communities in danger of dissolving. In their place will arise only louder and ever more extreme echoes of our own voices, our own opinions.

In evaluating the consequences of new communications technologies for democracy and free speech, Sunstein argues the question is not whether to regulate the Net (it's already regulated), but how; proves that freedom of speech is not an absolute; and underscores the enormous potential of the Internet to promote freedom as well as its potential to promote "cybercascades" of like-minded opinions that foster and enflame hate groups. The book ends by suggesting a range of potential reforms to correct current misconceptions and to improve deliberative democracy and the health of the American republic.

Chat with Cass Sunstein in a Message Forum hosted beginning April 1, 2001.

Synopsis:

"Cass Sunstein is one of the nation's preeminent legal minds and constitutional scholars. In Republic.com, he presents insightful and far-reaching perspectives on the Internet and its impact on free speech, the marketplace of ideas, and our democracy itself. He offers a lesson worth heeding by us all. The Internet is an effective means for preserving and promoting these cherished principles. But it also has the potential to undermine them--and we must not let that happen."--Senator Edward M. Kennedy

About the Author

Cass Sunstein has written extensively on constitutional law, the First Amendment, and jurisprudence. He is the Karl N. Llewellyn Professor of Jurisprudence at the University of Chicago Law School and Department of Political Science and is the author of numerous books, including Democracy and the Problem of Free Speech, The Partial Constitution, After the Rights Revolution, Free Markets and Social Justice, One Case at a Time: Judicial Minimalism on the Supreme Court, and, with Stephen Holmes, The Cost of Rights.

Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1 The Daily Me 3

CHAPTER 2 An Analogy and an Ideal 23

CHAPTER 3 Fragmentation and Cybercascades 51

CHAPTER 4 Social Glue and Spreading Information 89

CHAPTER 5 Citizens 105

CHAPTER 6 What's Regulation? A Plea 125

CHAPTER 7 Freedom of Speech 141

CHAPTER 8 Policies and Proposals 167

CHAPTER 9 Conclusion: Republic.com 191

Bibliographical Note 203

Notes 205

Acknowledgments 213

Index 215

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691070254
Author:
Sunstein, Cass R.
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Author:
Sunstein, Cass
Location:
Princeton, N.J.
Subject:
General
Subject:
U.S. Government
Subject:
Democracy
Subject:
Information technology
Subject:
Control (psychology)
Subject:
Internet
Subject:
Control
Subject:
Information society
Subject:
Constitutional - First Amendment
Subject:
Government - U.S. Government
Subject:
Political Ideologies - Democracy
Subject:
Philosophy
Subject:
Political philosophy
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Sociology
Series Volume:
ERDC/CRREL TR-00-7
Publication Date:
20010218
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
7 x 5 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General

Republic.com
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Product details 224 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691070254 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Cass Sunstein is one of the nation's preeminent legal minds and constitutional scholars. In Republic.com, he presents insightful and far-reaching perspectives on the Internet and its impact on free speech, the marketplace of ideas, and our democracy itself. He offers a lesson worth heeding by us all. The Internet is an effective means for preserving and promoting these cherished principles. But it also has the potential to undermine them--and we must not let that happen."--Senator Edward M. Kennedy
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