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Other titles in the Modern War Studies series:

Sharing Secrets with Stalin: How the Allies Traded Intelligence, 1941-1945 (Modern War Studies)

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Sharing Secrets with Stalin: How the Allies Traded Intelligence, 1941-1945 (Modern War Studies) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Bestselling author Bradley Smith reveals the surprisingly rich exchange of wartime intelligence between the Anglo-American allies and the Soviet Union, as well as the procedures and politics that made such an exchange possible.

Between the late 1930s and 1945, allied intelligence organizations expanded at an enormous rate in order to acquire the secret information their governments needed to win the war. But, as Smith demonstrates, the demand for intelligence far outpaced the ability of any one ally to produce it. For that reason, Washington, London, and Moscow were compelled to share some of their most sensitive secrets.

Historians have long known about the close Anglo-American intelligence collaboration, but until now the Soviet connection has been largely unexplored. Smith contends that Cold War animosities helped keep this story from a public that might have found it hard to believe that such cooperation was ever possible. In fact, official denials—from such illustrious Cold Warriors as Supreme Court Justice Lewis Powell and the CIA's Sherman Kent—continued well into the late 1980s.

Smith argues that, contrary to the official story, Soviet-American intelligence exchanges were both extensive and successful. He shows that East and West were not as hostile to each other during the war or as determined to march right off into the Cold War as many have suggested. Among other things, he provides convincing evidence that the U.S. Army gave the Soviets its highest-grade ULTRA intelligence in August 1945 to speed up the Soviet advances in the Far East.

Based on interviews and enormous research in Anglo-American archives and despite limited access to tenaciously guarded Soviet documents, Smith's book persuasively demonstrates how reluctant and suspicious allies, driven by the harsh realities of total war, finally set aside their ideological differences to work closely with people they neither trusted nor particularly liked.

Book News Annotation:

A study of the surprisingly rich exchange of wartime intelligence between the Anglo-American Allies and the Soviet Union, as well as the procedures and politics that made such an exchange possible. Drawing on interviews and research in Anglo-American archives (Soviet documents are still tenaciously guarded and allowed only limited access), the author demonstrates how reluctant and suspicious allies finally set aside their ideological differences to work closely with people they neither trusted nor particularly liked.
Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Bradley Smith reveals the surprisingly rich exchange of wartime intelligence between the Anglo-American Allies and the Soviet Union, as well as the procedures and politics that made such an exchange possible. Between the late 1930s and 1945, Allied intelligence organizations expanded at an enormous rate in order to acquire the secret information their governments needed to win the war. But, as Smith demonstrates, the demand for intelligence far outpaced the ability of any one ally to produce it. For that reason, Washington, London, and Moscow were compelled to share some of their most sensitive secrets. Based on interviews and extensive research in Anglo-American archives and despite limited access to tenaciously guarded Soviet documents, Smith's book persuasively demonstrates how reluctant and suspicious allies, driven by the harsh realities of total war, finally set aside their ideological differences to work closely with people they neither trusted nor particularly liked.

Synopsis:

"As engaging as it is astonishing, this book provides extremely important revelations and striking pen-portraits etched in acid of the main actors. Certainly the sources are fabulous". — John Erickson, author of The Road to stalingrad. "A well-written account filled with original material and documentation. Good reading for anyone interested in the history of WWII intelligence". — Publishers Weekly (starred review.)

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [291]-295) and index.

Table of Contents

Preface

List of Abbreviations

1. Overture

2. Searching for an Intelligence Partnership

3. Moaning and Dealing

4. The Turning Points of Late 1941

5. Difficult Times

6. Converging and Dividing Paths

7. The First Victorious Summer

8. A Winter of More Contentment

9. The D-Day Era

10. The Penultimate Phase Begins

11. Victory on One Front

12. An End to War?

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780700608003
Author:
Smith, Bradley F.
Publisher:
University Press of Kansas
Author:
Smith, Bradley F.
Location:
Lawrence, Kan. :
Subject:
Military - General
Subject:
Military - World War II
Subject:
World war, 1939-1945
Subject:
History
Subject:
Secret service
Subject:
Military intelligence
Subject:
Military intelligence -- History -- 20th century.
Subject:
World War, 19
Subject:
Military intelligence -- History.
Subject:
World War, 1939-1945 -- Secret service.
Subject:
Military-World War II General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Modern War Studies Hardcover
Series Volume:
43
Publication Date:
19961031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
328
Dimensions:
9.34x6.36x1.17 in. 1.54 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Military » World War II » Europe » General
History and Social Science » Military » World War II » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy

Sharing Secrets with Stalin: How the Allies Traded Intelligence, 1941-1945 (Modern War Studies) Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.50 In Stock
Product details 328 pages University Press of Kansas - English 9780700608003 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Bradley Smith reveals the surprisingly rich exchange of wartime intelligence between the Anglo-American Allies and the Soviet Union, as well as the procedures and politics that made such an exchange possible. Between the late 1930s and 1945, Allied intelligence organizations expanded at an enormous rate in order to acquire the secret information their governments needed to win the war. But, as Smith demonstrates, the demand for intelligence far outpaced the ability of any one ally to produce it. For that reason, Washington, London, and Moscow were compelled to share some of their most sensitive secrets. Based on interviews and extensive research in Anglo-American archives and despite limited access to tenaciously guarded Soviet documents, Smith's book persuasively demonstrates how reluctant and suspicious allies, driven by the harsh realities of total war, finally set aside their ideological differences to work closely with people they neither trusted nor particularly liked.
"Synopsis" by , "As engaging as it is astonishing, this book provides extremely important revelations and striking pen-portraits etched in acid of the main actors. Certainly the sources are fabulous". — John Erickson, author of The Road to stalingrad. "A well-written account filled with original material and documentation. Good reading for anyone interested in the history of WWII intelligence". — Publishers Weekly (starred review.)
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