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1776

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1776 Cover

ISBN13: 9780743226721
ISBN10: 0743226720
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In this stirring book, David McCullough tells the intensely human story of those who marched with General George Washington in the year of the Declaration of Independence — when the whole American cause was riding on their success, without which all hope for independence would have been dashed and the noble ideals of the Declaration would have amounted to little more than words on paper.

Based on extensive research in both American and British archives, 1776 is a powerful drama written with extraordinary narrative vitality. It is the story of Americans in the ranks, men of every shape, size, and color, farmers, schoolteachers, shoemakers, no-accounts, and mere boys turned soldiers. And it is the story of the King's men, the British commander, William Howe, and his highly disciplined redcoats who looked on their rebel foes with contempt and fought with a valor too little known.

Here also is the Revolution as experienced by American Loyalists, Hessian mercenaries, politicians, preachers, traitors, spies, men and women of all kinds caught in the paths of war.

At the center of the drama, with Washington, are two young American patriots, who, at first, knew no more of war than what they had read in books — Nathanael Greene, a Quaker who was made a general at thirty-three, and Henry Knox, a twenty-five-year-old bookseller who had the preposterous idea of hauling the guns of Fort Ticonderoga overland to Boston in the dead of winter.

But it is the American commander-in-chief who stands foremost — Washington, who had never before led an army in battle.

The book begins in London on October 26, 1775, when His Majesty King George III went before Parliament to declare America in rebellion and to affirm his resolve to crush it. From there the story moves to the Siege of Boston and its astonishing outcome, then to New York, where British ships and British troops appear in numbers never imagined and the newly proclaimed Continental Army confronts the enemy for the first time. David McCullough's vivid rendering of the Battle of Brooklyn and the daring American escape that followed is a part of the book few readers will ever forget.

As the crucial weeks pass, defeat follows defeat, and in the long retreat across New Jersey, all hope seems gone, until Washington launches the "brilliant stroke" that will change history.

The darkest hours of that tumultuous year were as dark as any Americans have known. Especially in our own tumultuous time, 1776 is powerful testimony to how much is owed to a rare few in that brave founding epoch, and what a miracle it was that things turned out as they did.

Written as a companion work to his celebrated biography of John Adams, David McCullough's 1776 is another landmark in the literature of American history.

Review:

"Bestselling historian and two-time Pulitzer winner McCullough follows up John Adams by staying with America's founding, focusing on a year rather than an individual: a momentous 12 months in the fight for independence. How did a group of ragtag farmers defeat the world's greatest empire? As McCullough vividly shows, they did it with a great deal of suffering, determination, ingenuity — and, the author notes, luck.Although brief by McCullough's standards, this is a narrative tour de force, exhibiting all the hallmarks the author is known for: fascinating subject matter, expert research and detailed, graceful prose. Throughout, McCullough deftly captures both sides of the conflict. The British commander, Lord General Howe, perhaps not fully accepting that the rebellion could succeed, underestimated the Americans' ingenuity. In turn, the outclassed Americans used the cover of night, surprise and an abiding hunger for victory to astonishing effect. Henry Knox, for example, trekked 300 miles each way over harsh winter terrain to bring 120,000 pounds of artillery from Fort Ticonderoga to Boston, enabling the Americans, in a stealthy nighttime advance, to seize Dorchester Heights, thus winning the whole city.Luck, McCullough writes, also played into the American cause — a vicious winter storm, for example, stalled a British counterattack at Boston, and twice Washington staged improbable, daring escapes when the war could have been lost. Similarly, McCullough says, the cruel northeaster in which Washington's troops famously crossed the Delaware was both 'a blessing and a curse.' McCullough keenly renders the harshness of the elements, the rampant disease and the constant supply shortfalls, from gunpowder to food, that affected morale on both sides — and it certainly didn't help the British that it took six weeks to relay news to and from London. Simply put, this is history writing at its best from one of its top practitioners. Agent, Morton Janklow. 1,250,000 first printing; BOMC and History Book Club main selections; Literary Guild and QPB featured alternates; 18-city author tour. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"[A] lucid and lively work that will engage both Revolutionary War bores and general readers who have avoided the subject since their school days." New York Times

Review:

"[A] gripping read: readable, even thrilling popular history, and a graphic reminder of the parlous circumstances that attended the birth of this nation." Michiko Kakutani, the New York Times

Review:

"[A] classic — brilliantly written, scrupulously researched, tremendously informative and endlessly entertaining....With 1776, David McCullough has added another masterwork to his collection, one that is both informative and inspiring." Philadelphia Inquirer

Review:

"Though there is nary a dull moment in this breezy book, 1776 amounts to a deeply unsatisfying account of both a fascinating man and a pivotal historical moment....[A] deliciously readable book that leaves you famished for philosophical context. (Grade: B-)" Entertainment Weekly

Review:

"In 1776, his dramatic recounting of the critical year in the American Revolution, historian David McCullough has found a way to tell American history's untellable story....1776 will surely be, and deservedly, one of this year's best-selling books." Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Review:

"McCullough employs his formidable talent for narrative without unnecessarily repeating what has already been said many times." Providence Journal

Review:

"David McCullough, America's most celebrated popular historian, has done it again — written another engaging work of narrative history." Washington Post

Review:

"[A] short but highly engaging study." Wall Street Journal

Review:

"One of the most compelling nonfiction works McCullough has written and should be required reading in living rooms from coast to coast." Denver Post

Review:

"What McCullough has done here...is to take not just a piece of history but a well-traveled piece of history and render it anew." Newsday

Review:

"[F]luent and engaging....McCullough's brilliant work is a model for us all. In his unrivaled mastery of one part of the historian's task, we are all his students." Boston Globe

Synopsis:

Twice winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Truman and John Adams, David McCullough returns with the story of the Revolutionary War — a book certain to be another landmark in the literature of American history.

Synopsis:

From #1 New York Times bestselling author A. Scott Berg comes the definitive—and revelatory—biography of one of the great American figures of modern times.

One hundred years after his inauguration, Woodrow Wilson still stands as one of the most influential figures of the twentieth century, and one of the most enigmatic. And now, after more than a decade of research and writing, Pulitzer Prize–winning author A. Scott Berg has completed Wilson—the most personal and penetrating biography ever written about the twenty-eighth President.

In addition to the hundreds of thousands of documents in the Wilson Archives, Berg was the first biographer to gain access to two recently discovered caches of papers belonging to those close to Wilson. From this material, Berg was able to add countless details—even several unknown events—that fill in missing pieces of Wilsons character, and cast new light on his entire life.

From the visionary Princeton professor who constructed a model for higher education in America to the architect of the ill-fated League of Nations, from the devout Commander in Chief who ushered the country through its first great World War to the widower of intense passion and turbulence who wooed a second wife with hundreds of astonishing love letters, from the idealist determined to make the world “safe for democracy” to the stroke-crippled leader whose incapacity—and the subterfuges around it—were among the centurys greatest secrets, from the trailblazer whose ideas paved the way for the New Deal and the Progressive administrations that followed to the politician whose partisan battles with his opponents left him a broken man, and ultimately, a tragic figure—this is a book at once magisterial and deeply emotional about the whole of Wilsons life, accomplishments, and failings. This is not just Wilson the icon—but Wilson the man.

INCLUDES PHOTOGRAPHS

 

Synopsis:

Americaand#8217;s beloved and distinguished historian presents, in a book of breathtaking excitement, drama, and narrative force, the stirring story of the year of our nationand#8217;s birth, 1776, interweaving, on both sides of the Atlantic, the actions and decisions that led Great Britain to undertake a war against her rebellious colonial subjects and that placed Americaand#8217;s survival in the hands of George Washington.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;In this masterful book, David McCullough tells the intensely human story of those who marched with General George Washington in the year of the Declaration of Independenceand#8212;when the whole American cause was riding on their success, without which all hope for independence would have been dashed and the noble ideals of the Declaration would have amounted to little more than words on paper. andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;Based on extensive research in both American and British archives, andlt;I andgt;1776andlt;/Iandgt; is a powerful drama written with extraordinary narrative vitality. It is the story of Americans in the ranks, men of every shape, size, and color, farmers, schoolteachers, shoemakers, no-accounts, and mere boys turned soldiers. And it is the story of the Kingand#8217;s men, the British commander, William Howe, and his highly disciplined redcoats who looked on their rebel foes with contempt and fought with a valor too little known. andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;Written as a companion work to his celebrated biography of John Adams, David McCulloughand#8217;s andlt;I andgt;1776andlt;/Iandgt; is another landmark in the literature of American history.

About the Author

David McCullough has been called a "master of the art of narrative history." His books have been praised for their exceptional narrative sweep, their scholarship and insight into American life, and for their literary distinction.

In the words of the citation accompanying his honorary degree from Yale, "As an historian, he paints with words, giving us pictures of the American people that live, breath, and above all, confront the fundamental issues of courage, achievement, and moral character."

Author of 1776, John Adams, Truman, The Johnstown Flood, The Great Bridge, The Path Between the Seas, Mornings on Horseback, and Brave Companions, he has received the Pulitzer Prize twice (in 1993, for Truman, and in 2001, for John Adams), the Francis Parkman Prize, and the Los Angeles Times Book Award, and has twice won the National Book Award.

For his work overall he has been honored by the National Book Foundation Distinguished Contribution to American Letters Award, the National Humanities Medal, the St. Louis Literary Award, the Carl Sandburg Award, and the New York Public Library's Literary Lion Award. None of his books has ever been out of print.

In a crowded, productive career, Mr. McCullough has been an editor, essayist, teacher, lecturer, and familiar presence on public television — as host of Smithsonian World, The American Experience, and narrator of numerous documentaries including The Civil War and Napoleon. He is a past president of the Society of American Historians. He has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and has received 31 honorary degrees.

A gifted speaker, Mr. McCullough has lectured in all parts of the country and abroad, as well as at the White House, as part of the White House presidential lecture series. He is also one of the few private citizens to be asked to speak before a joint session of Congress.

Born in Pittsburgh in 1933, Mr. McCullough was educated there and at Yale, where he was graduated with honors in English literature. An avid reader, traveler, and landscape painter, he lives in West Tisbury, Massachusetts with his wife Rosalee Barnes McCullough. They have five children and fifteen grandchildren.

Table of Contents

Contents

Part I: The Siege

Chapter One: Sovereign Duty

Chapter Two: Rabble in Arms

Chapter Three: Dorchester Heights

Part II: Fateful Summer

Chapter Four: The Lines Are Drawn

Chapter Five: Field of Battle

Part III: The Long Retreat

Chapter Six: Fortune Frowns

Chapter Seven: Darkest Hour

Acknowledgments

Source Notes

Bibliography

Index

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

BABY GIRL, March 25, 2010 (view all comments by BABY GIRL)
My grandpa loves this book and so do i!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)
Lucy Little, August 29, 2009 (view all comments by Lucy Little)
An excellent book to bring to life the real people involved in the American Revolution. The way we learn history in school is such a disservice to us as citizens of our own country and the world. So much more was involved than what we learned. I appreciate authors such as David McCullough who provide this information in an interesting and meaningful manner.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
ogreene, January 29, 2009 (view all comments by ogreene)
exelet book i dont like war but i like this book
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(3 of 5 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780743226721
Author:
McCullough, David
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Author:
Berg, A. Scott
Subject:
History
Subject:
United states
Subject:
United States - Revolutionary War
Subject:
United States / Revolutionary Period (1775-1800)
Subject:
United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-
Subject:
US History-Revolution and Constitution Era
Subject:
David McCullough, 1776, American Revolution, Revolutionary War, Declaration of Independence, British, King George III, colonies, colonialism, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, Founding Fathers, General
Subject:
David McCullough, 1776, American Revolution, Revolutionary War, Declaration of Independence, British, King George III, colonies, colonialism, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, Founding Fathers, General
Subject:
David McCullough, 1776, American Revolution, Revolutionary War, Declaration of Independence, British, King George III, colonies, colonialism, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, Founding Fathers, General
Subject:
Presidents
Subject:
David McCullough, 1776, American Revolution, Revolutionary War, Declaration of Independence, British, King George III, colonies, colonialism, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, Founding Fathers, General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
B102
Publication Date:
June 2006
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
2-8 pp b/w inserts, 1-16 4/c insert
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 18

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1776 Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.95 In Stock
Product details 400 pages Simon & Schuster - English 9780743226721 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Bestselling historian and two-time Pulitzer winner McCullough follows up John Adams by staying with America's founding, focusing on a year rather than an individual: a momentous 12 months in the fight for independence. How did a group of ragtag farmers defeat the world's greatest empire? As McCullough vividly shows, they did it with a great deal of suffering, determination, ingenuity — and, the author notes, luck.Although brief by McCullough's standards, this is a narrative tour de force, exhibiting all the hallmarks the author is known for: fascinating subject matter, expert research and detailed, graceful prose. Throughout, McCullough deftly captures both sides of the conflict. The British commander, Lord General Howe, perhaps not fully accepting that the rebellion could succeed, underestimated the Americans' ingenuity. In turn, the outclassed Americans used the cover of night, surprise and an abiding hunger for victory to astonishing effect. Henry Knox, for example, trekked 300 miles each way over harsh winter terrain to bring 120,000 pounds of artillery from Fort Ticonderoga to Boston, enabling the Americans, in a stealthy nighttime advance, to seize Dorchester Heights, thus winning the whole city.Luck, McCullough writes, also played into the American cause — a vicious winter storm, for example, stalled a British counterattack at Boston, and twice Washington staged improbable, daring escapes when the war could have been lost. Similarly, McCullough says, the cruel northeaster in which Washington's troops famously crossed the Delaware was both 'a blessing and a curse.' McCullough keenly renders the harshness of the elements, the rampant disease and the constant supply shortfalls, from gunpowder to food, that affected morale on both sides — and it certainly didn't help the British that it took six weeks to relay news to and from London. Simply put, this is history writing at its best from one of its top practitioners. Agent, Morton Janklow. 1,250,000 first printing; BOMC and History Book Club main selections; Literary Guild and QPB featured alternates; 18-city author tour. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "[A] lucid and lively work that will engage both Revolutionary War bores and general readers who have avoided the subject since their school days."
"Review" by , "[A] gripping read: readable, even thrilling popular history, and a graphic reminder of the parlous circumstances that attended the birth of this nation."
"Review" by , "[A] classic — brilliantly written, scrupulously researched, tremendously informative and endlessly entertaining....With 1776, David McCullough has added another masterwork to his collection, one that is both informative and inspiring."
"Review" by , "Though there is nary a dull moment in this breezy book, 1776 amounts to a deeply unsatisfying account of both a fascinating man and a pivotal historical moment....[A] deliciously readable book that leaves you famished for philosophical context. (Grade: B-)"
"Review" by , "In 1776, his dramatic recounting of the critical year in the American Revolution, historian David McCullough has found a way to tell American history's untellable story....1776 will surely be, and deservedly, one of this year's best-selling books."
"Review" by , "McCullough employs his formidable talent for narrative without unnecessarily repeating what has already been said many times."
"Review" by , "David McCullough, America's most celebrated popular historian, has done it again — written another engaging work of narrative history."
"Review" by , "[A] short but highly engaging study."
"Review" by , "One of the most compelling nonfiction works McCullough has written and should be required reading in living rooms from coast to coast."
"Review" by , "What McCullough has done here...is to take not just a piece of history but a well-traveled piece of history and render it anew."
"Review" by , "[F]luent and engaging....McCullough's brilliant work is a model for us all. In his unrivaled mastery of one part of the historian's task, we are all his students."
"Synopsis" by , Twice winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Truman and John Adams, David McCullough returns with the story of the Revolutionary War — a book certain to be another landmark in the literature of American history.
"Synopsis" by ,
From #1 New York Times bestselling author A. Scott Berg comes the definitive—and revelatory—biography of one of the great American figures of modern times.

One hundred years after his inauguration, Woodrow Wilson still stands as one of the most influential figures of the twentieth century, and one of the most enigmatic. And now, after more than a decade of research and writing, Pulitzer Prize–winning author A. Scott Berg has completed Wilson—the most personal and penetrating biography ever written about the twenty-eighth President.

In addition to the hundreds of thousands of documents in the Wilson Archives, Berg was the first biographer to gain access to two recently discovered caches of papers belonging to those close to Wilson. From this material, Berg was able to add countless details—even several unknown events—that fill in missing pieces of Wilsons character, and cast new light on his entire life.

From the visionary Princeton professor who constructed a model for higher education in America to the architect of the ill-fated League of Nations, from the devout Commander in Chief who ushered the country through its first great World War to the widower of intense passion and turbulence who wooed a second wife with hundreds of astonishing love letters, from the idealist determined to make the world “safe for democracy” to the stroke-crippled leader whose incapacity—and the subterfuges around it—were among the centurys greatest secrets, from the trailblazer whose ideas paved the way for the New Deal and the Progressive administrations that followed to the politician whose partisan battles with his opponents left him a broken man, and ultimately, a tragic figure—this is a book at once magisterial and deeply emotional about the whole of Wilsons life, accomplishments, and failings. This is not just Wilson the icon—but Wilson the man.

INCLUDES PHOTOGRAPHS

 

"Synopsis" by , Americaand#8217;s beloved and distinguished historian presents, in a book of breathtaking excitement, drama, and narrative force, the stirring story of the year of our nationand#8217;s birth, 1776, interweaving, on both sides of the Atlantic, the actions and decisions that led Great Britain to undertake a war against her rebellious colonial subjects and that placed Americaand#8217;s survival in the hands of George Washington.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;In this masterful book, David McCullough tells the intensely human story of those who marched with General George Washington in the year of the Declaration of Independenceand#8212;when the whole American cause was riding on their success, without which all hope for independence would have been dashed and the noble ideals of the Declaration would have amounted to little more than words on paper. andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;Based on extensive research in both American and British archives, andlt;I andgt;1776andlt;/Iandgt; is a powerful drama written with extraordinary narrative vitality. It is the story of Americans in the ranks, men of every shape, size, and color, farmers, schoolteachers, shoemakers, no-accounts, and mere boys turned soldiers. And it is the story of the Kingand#8217;s men, the British commander, William Howe, and his highly disciplined redcoats who looked on their rebel foes with contempt and fought with a valor too little known. andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;Written as a companion work to his celebrated biography of John Adams, David McCulloughand#8217;s andlt;I andgt;1776andlt;/Iandgt; is another landmark in the literature of American history.
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