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Him Her Him Again the End of Him

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Him Her Him Again the End of Him Cover

ISBN13: 9780743296236
ISBN10: 0743296230
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Patricia Marx is one of the finest comic writers of her time, as readers of the New Yorker and fans of Saturday Night Live already know. Her fiction debut is an endlessly entertaining comic novel about one woman's romantic fixation on her first boyfriend.

Marx's unabashedly neurotic heroine falls for philosopher Eugene Obello during her graduate school days in Cambridge, England. Why would anyone fall for a man who receives a grant to pursue Ego Studies? Why would that person remain obsessed, even after this guy marries and becomes a father? By "obsessed," we mean, well...sex and lusting and longing and hoping and waiting for this cad who is spread too thin. Her friends loathe him. Why can't she drop him? Is it because she was the only virgin on campus before she bumped into Eugene (a man who was hardly a virgin)? Is it because he kept a copy of the Magna Carta in his pocket? "You know what I think it really was?" she reflects. "He was a narcissist. I love narcissists...you don't have to buoy them up." When things get unbearable, our girl gives up trying to write her thesis — and tries to give up on Eugene. She says good-bye to her dormitory room, decorated in a color she calls veal, and becomes a TV writer in New York on the hit sketch-comedy show Taped But Proud. Coincidentally, Eugene moves to New York as well — to teach a seminar called "Toward a Philosophy of the Number Two" ("And if that goes well," he says, "they might let me have a go at the number three"). More years of lusting and longing, hoping and waiting. Until a spectacular event changes everything.

Review:

"Marx's unnamed protagonist, a Baltimore native turned Cambridge University graduate student, is struggling with her thesis on West Indian immigration when she meets Eugene Obello, fresh from Princeton and at Cambridge on a philosophy teaching fellowship. Though he's self-absorbed, distracted and cheesy ('I will always feel a great deal of agape toward you, O my everlasting,' he tells the narrator) she falls for him. But he soon leaves her for the frequently ill Margaret, and the narrator is once again alone with her incomplete thesis. She quits school, returns to the states and lands a writing gig at a Saturday Night Live — type show, but Eugene lingers in her mind. He, of course, resurfaces in New York, and the two embark on an affair. (He has since married Margaret.) Marx, a former SNL writer and current New Yorker contributor, undermines her main source of tension — the narrator's obsession with Eugene — by failing to present Eugene as anything more than a brainy fop, and though his demise is fitting, it'll have E.M. Forster fans crying foul." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"There are college boyfriends. There are caddishly bad college boyfriends. And there are caddishly bad college boyfriends you somehow can't quit. And now, thanks to Patricia Marx's 'Him Her Him Again the End of Him,' there's Eugene.

Encountered while her 21-year-old narrator is studying abroad at Cambridge University, Eugene is a budding philosopher, fresh out of Princeton and AmeriCorps... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"This humorous novel, filled with wacky and slightly off-kilter characters, is recommended for hip, urban readers who enjoy comedies of manners." Library Journal

Review:

"A sprawling but very funny tale; if insecurity is the source of great humor, Marx has hit the mother lode." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Marx's novel made me laugh so hard that I kept trying to read lines aloud to my boyfriend....[T]here's much to like and admire here, and, no doubt, there are many romantically obsessed friends to whom it can be recommended." Bliss Broyard, New York Times

Review:

"I laughed at its audacity, and cried that I didn't write it." Steve Martin, author of Shopgirl

Review:

"Despite improbable plot twists, minor plot inconsistencies, and a definitively uncatchy title, there are some laugh-out-loud moments." Booklist

Synopsis:

From a celebrated humor writer for the New Yorker comes a brilliantly observed debut novel about the neurosis of romance and one single woman's hilariously unhealthy obsession with her first boyfriend.

About the Author

Marx is Saturday Night Live writer, screenwriter, TV writer, and author of many books. She teaches humor writing at the New School in New York City.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Janet Hamilton, February 21, 2007 (view all comments by Janet Hamilton)
Like a Saturday Night Live sketch, this book is not flawless, but it is very funny and almost perfectly embodies obsession and dysfunction in the cynically conceived get a life delusion that passes for the “heroine’s” existence. It’s one of those stay up all night to see how she gets over him reads. The quote that best describes the sarcastic style and tone is: “Once you do something against your better judgment, it gets easier to do something else against your better judgment and pretty soon, you’re doing things against everyone’s better judgment.” Actually, I was so sick of hearing about that obnoxious Eugene Obello that I could hardly bear to go back and search through the book for the name of the neurotic narrator who is so fixated on whatever it is he means to her that she seems to have lost not only her senses but her name. The ending is even harder to believe than all that precedes. Patricia Marx, go directly to Saturday Night Live. On the way, pass GO and collect $$$ to buy more baked potatoes to take out of the oven with your bare hand.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780743296236
Author:
Marx, Patricia
Publisher:
Scribner
Subject:
Humorous
Subject:
Single women
Copyright:
Publication Date:
January 2007
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.48x6.64x.96 in. .87 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Humor » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Him Her Him Again the End of Him Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$2.95 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Scribner Book Company - English 9780743296236 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Marx's unnamed protagonist, a Baltimore native turned Cambridge University graduate student, is struggling with her thesis on West Indian immigration when she meets Eugene Obello, fresh from Princeton and at Cambridge on a philosophy teaching fellowship. Though he's self-absorbed, distracted and cheesy ('I will always feel a great deal of agape toward you, O my everlasting,' he tells the narrator) she falls for him. But he soon leaves her for the frequently ill Margaret, and the narrator is once again alone with her incomplete thesis. She quits school, returns to the states and lands a writing gig at a Saturday Night Live — type show, but Eugene lingers in her mind. He, of course, resurfaces in New York, and the two embark on an affair. (He has since married Margaret.) Marx, a former SNL writer and current New Yorker contributor, undermines her main source of tension — the narrator's obsession with Eugene — by failing to present Eugene as anything more than a brainy fop, and though his demise is fitting, it'll have E.M. Forster fans crying foul." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "This humorous novel, filled with wacky and slightly off-kilter characters, is recommended for hip, urban readers who enjoy comedies of manners."
"Review" by , "A sprawling but very funny tale; if insecurity is the source of great humor, Marx has hit the mother lode."
"Review" by , "Marx's novel made me laugh so hard that I kept trying to read lines aloud to my boyfriend....[T]here's much to like and admire here, and, no doubt, there are many romantically obsessed friends to whom it can be recommended."
"Review" by , "I laughed at its audacity, and cried that I didn't write it."
"Review" by , "Despite improbable plot twists, minor plot inconsistencies, and a definitively uncatchy title, there are some laugh-out-loud moments."
"Synopsis" by , From a celebrated humor writer for the New Yorker comes a brilliantly observed debut novel about the neurosis of romance and one single woman's hilariously unhealthy obsession with her first boyfriend.
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