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This title in other editions

My Name Is Iran

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My Name Is Iran Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A century of family tales from two beloved but divided homelands, Iran and America.

Drawing on her remarkable personal history, NPR producer Davar Ardalan brings us the lives of three generations of women and their ordeals with love, rejection, and revolution. Her American grandmother's love affair with an Iranian physician took her from New York to Iran in 1931. Ardalan herself moved from San Francsico to rural Iran in 1964 with her Iranian American parents who barely spoke Farsi. After her parents' divorce, Ardalan joined her father in Brookline, Massachusetts, where he had gone to make a new life; however improbably, after high school, Ardalan decided to move back to an Islamic Iran. When she arrived, she discovered a world she hardly recognized, and one which demands a near-complete renunciation of the freedoms she experienced in the West. In time, she and her young family make the opposite migration and discover the difficulties, however paradoxical, inherent in living a free life in America.

Review:

"Ardalan, senior producer at NPR's 'Morning Edition,' records in wooden bits and pieces the history of her Iranian family, both into and out of America. Ardalan (her given first name is Iran) is the granddaughter of an enterprising Bakhtiari tribesman who attended the American mission school in Tehran and graduated from Syracuse Medical School in 1926 at age 54; together with Ardalan's grandmother, an adventurous American nurse from Idaho, they moved to Iran to start both a hospital and a family of seven children. Ardalan, born in San Francisco in 1964, grew up largely in Iran (her father was a Kurdish architect, and her mother a writer and translator). In 1980 she returned to America, where she adopted her middle name to avoid censure, but three years later, in the most arresting segment of the memoir, Ardalan recounts her return to Tehran at age 18 to accept an arranged marriage and become a Shiite Muslim. Eventually she attended journalism school in New Mexico, endured two divorces and had four children over the years of building her career. While her prose is plain, Ardalan's testimony to the feminist spirit of the pioneering women in her family, and in the face of centuries-long strictures against the advancement of women, is a supreme achievement." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Ardalan, senior producer at NPR's Morning Edition, records in wooden bits and pieces the history of her Iranian family, both into and out of America. Ardalan (her given first name is Iran) is the granddaughter of an enterprising Bakhtiari tribesman who attended the American mission school in Tehran and graduated from Syracuse Medical School in 1926 at age 54; together with Ardalan's grandmother, an adventurous American nurse from Idaho, they moved to Iran to start both a hospital and a family of seven children. Ardalan, born in San Francisco in 1964, grew up largely in Iran (her father was a Kurdish architect, and her mother a writer and translator). In 1980 she returned to America, where she adopted her middle name to avoid censure, but three years later, in the most arresting segment of the memoir, Ardalan recounts her return to Tehran at age 18 to accept an arranged marriage and become a Shiite Muslim. Eventually she attended journalism school in New Mexico, endured two divorces and had four children over the years of building her career. While her prose is plain, Ardalan's testimony to the feminist spirit of the pioneering women in her family, and in the face of centuries-long strictures against the advancement of women, is a supreme achievement." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"By turns fascinating and frustrating, Ms. Ardalan's memoir is a case study of a book in desperate need of an editor....What keeps the reader reading My Name Is Iran is the remarkable trajectory traced by members of three generations of Ms. Ardalan's family." Michiko Kakutani, New York Times

Review:

"In telling the story of three generations of women who circled back and forth between Iran and America, Ardalan perceptively draws parallels between 'the dichotomy of free will versus destiny' in her family with that in Iran itself." Booklist

Review:

"[An] intimate, readable and revealing tale of a maverick daughter of modern Iran and a rare glimpse into the many layers of life in that nation and the aspirations and frustrations that have shaped its recent history." Vali Nasr, author of The Shia Revival: How Conflicts within Islam Will Shape the Future

Synopsis:

"Ardalan's testimony to the feminist spirit of the pioneering women in her family, and in the face of centuries-long strictures against the advancement of women, is a supreme achievement."--Publishers Weekly
 
Drawing on her remarkable personal history, Davar Ardalan brings us the lives of three generations of women and their ordeals with love, rejection, and revolution. Ardalan's Iranian American parents, who barely spoke Farsi, moved from San Francisco to rural Iran in 1964. After her parents' divorce, Ardalan briefly joined her father in Brookline, Massachusetts, then, however improbably, decided to move back to an Islamic Iran. When she arrived, she discovered a world she hardly recognized, and one which demanded a near-complete renunciation of the freedoms she experienced in the West. In time, she and her young family make the opposite migration and discover the difficulties, however paradoxical, inherent in living a free life in America.

Synopsis:

Drawing on her remarkable personal history, a National Public Radio producer brings readers the lives of three generations of women and their ordeals with love, rejection, and revolution in America and Iran.

About the Author

Davar Ardalan is an award-winning producer for NPR's "Morning Edition." In a three-part "Morning Edition" series produced with American RadioWorks that aired in February 2004, she traced her personal journey as well as Iran's struggle for a lawful society, twenty-five years after the 1979 Islamic Revolution.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780805079203
Subtitle:
A Memoir
Author:
Ardalan, Davar
Publisher:
Holt Paperbacks
Subject:
Women
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Radio producers and directors
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Editors, Journalists, Publishers
Subject:
BIO026000
Publication Date:
20080108
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
20-25 bandw illustrations
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 x 0.75 in

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Related Subjects


History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Middle Eastern American
History and Social Science » Middle East » General History
History and Social Science » World History » Middle East

My Name Is Iran Used Hardcover
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Product details 336 pages Henry Holt & Company - English 9780805079203 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Ardalan, senior producer at NPR's 'Morning Edition,' records in wooden bits and pieces the history of her Iranian family, both into and out of America. Ardalan (her given first name is Iran) is the granddaughter of an enterprising Bakhtiari tribesman who attended the American mission school in Tehran and graduated from Syracuse Medical School in 1926 at age 54; together with Ardalan's grandmother, an adventurous American nurse from Idaho, they moved to Iran to start both a hospital and a family of seven children. Ardalan, born in San Francisco in 1964, grew up largely in Iran (her father was a Kurdish architect, and her mother a writer and translator). In 1980 she returned to America, where she adopted her middle name to avoid censure, but three years later, in the most arresting segment of the memoir, Ardalan recounts her return to Tehran at age 18 to accept an arranged marriage and become a Shiite Muslim. Eventually she attended journalism school in New Mexico, endured two divorces and had four children over the years of building her career. While her prose is plain, Ardalan's testimony to the feminist spirit of the pioneering women in her family, and in the face of centuries-long strictures against the advancement of women, is a supreme achievement." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Ardalan, senior producer at NPR's Morning Edition, records in wooden bits and pieces the history of her Iranian family, both into and out of America. Ardalan (her given first name is Iran) is the granddaughter of an enterprising Bakhtiari tribesman who attended the American mission school in Tehran and graduated from Syracuse Medical School in 1926 at age 54; together with Ardalan's grandmother, an adventurous American nurse from Idaho, they moved to Iran to start both a hospital and a family of seven children. Ardalan, born in San Francisco in 1964, grew up largely in Iran (her father was a Kurdish architect, and her mother a writer and translator). In 1980 she returned to America, where she adopted her middle name to avoid censure, but three years later, in the most arresting segment of the memoir, Ardalan recounts her return to Tehran at age 18 to accept an arranged marriage and become a Shiite Muslim. Eventually she attended journalism school in New Mexico, endured two divorces and had four children over the years of building her career. While her prose is plain, Ardalan's testimony to the feminist spirit of the pioneering women in her family, and in the face of centuries-long strictures against the advancement of women, is a supreme achievement." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "By turns fascinating and frustrating, Ms. Ardalan's memoir is a case study of a book in desperate need of an editor....What keeps the reader reading My Name Is Iran is the remarkable trajectory traced by members of three generations of Ms. Ardalan's family."
"Review" by , "In telling the story of three generations of women who circled back and forth between Iran and America, Ardalan perceptively draws parallels between 'the dichotomy of free will versus destiny' in her family with that in Iran itself."
"Review" by , "[An] intimate, readable and revealing tale of a maverick daughter of modern Iran and a rare glimpse into the many layers of life in that nation and the aspirations and frustrations that have shaped its recent history."
"Synopsis" by ,
"Ardalan's testimony to the feminist spirit of the pioneering women in her family, and in the face of centuries-long strictures against the advancement of women, is a supreme achievement."--Publishers Weekly
 
Drawing on her remarkable personal history, Davar Ardalan brings us the lives of three generations of women and their ordeals with love, rejection, and revolution. Ardalan's Iranian American parents, who barely spoke Farsi, moved from San Francisco to rural Iran in 1964. After her parents' divorce, Ardalan briefly joined her father in Brookline, Massachusetts, then, however improbably, decided to move back to an Islamic Iran. When she arrived, she discovered a world she hardly recognized, and one which demanded a near-complete renunciation of the freedoms she experienced in the West. In time, she and her young family make the opposite migration and discover the difficulties, however paradoxical, inherent in living a free life in America.
"Synopsis" by , Drawing on her remarkable personal history, a National Public Radio producer brings readers the lives of three generations of women and their ordeals with love, rejection, and revolution in America and Iran.

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