Poetry Madness
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Interviews | March 17, 2014

Shawn Donley: IMG Peter Stark: The Powells.com Interview



Peter StarkIt's hard to believe that 200 years ago, the Pacific Northwest was one of the most remote and isolated regions in the world. In 1810, four years... Continue »
  1. $19.59 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$5.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton Philosophy- Atheism and Humanism

More copies of this ISBN

Irreligion: A Mathematician Explains Why the Arguments for God Just Don't Add Up

by

Irreligion: A Mathematician Explains Why the Arguments for God Just Don't Add Up Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:


A Lifelong Unbeliever Finds No Reason to Change His Mind

Are there any logical reasons to believe in God? Mathematician and bestselling author John Allen Paulos thinks not. In Irreligion he presents the case for his own worldview, organizing his book into twelve chapters that refute the twelve arguments most often put forward for believing in God’s existence. The latter arguments, Paulos relates in his characteristically lighthearted style, “range from what might be called golden oldies to those with a more contemporary beat. On the playlist are the firstcause argument, the argument from design, the ontological argument, arguments from faith and biblical codes, the argument from the anthropic principle, the moral universality argument, and others.” Interspersed among his twelve counterarguments are remarks on a variety of irreligious themes, ranging from the nature of miracles and creationist probability to cognitive illusions and prudential wagers. Special attention is paid to topics, arguments, and questions that spring from his incredulity “not only about religion but also about others’ credulity.” Despite the strong influence of his day job, Paulos says, there isn’t a single mathematical formula in the book.

Review:

"Few of the recent books on atheism have been worth reading just for wit and style, but this is one of them: Paulos is truly funny. De-spite the title, the Temple University math professor doesn't actually discuss mathematics much, which will be a relief to any numerically challenged readers who felt intimidated by his previous book Innumeracy: Mathematical Illiteracy and Its Consequences. In this short primer ('just the gist with an occasional jest'), Paulos tackles 12 of the most common arguments for God, including the argument from design, the idea that a 'moral universality' points to a creator God, the notion of first causes and the argument from coincidence, among others. Along the way, he intersperses irreverent and entertaining little chapterlets that contain his musings on various subjects, including a rather hilarious imagined IM exchange with God that slyly parodies Neale Donald Walsch's Conversations with God. 'Why does solemnity tend to infect almost all discussions of religion?' Paulos asks, clearly bemoaning the dearth of humor. This little book goes a long way toward correcting the problem, and provides both atheists and religious apologists some digestible food for thought along the way." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Are there any logical reasons to believe in God? Mathematician and bestselling author Paulos thinks not. In "Irreligion" he presents the case for his own worldview, organizing his book into 12 chapters that refute the 12 arguments most often put forward for believing in Gods existence.

Synopsis:

A Lifelong Unbeliever Finds No Reason to Change His Mind

 

Are there any logical reasons to believe in God? Mathematician and bestselling author John Allen Paulos thinks not. In Irreligion he presents the case for his own worldview, organizing his book into twelve chapters that refute the twelve arguments most often put forward for believing in God's existence. The latter arguments, Paulos relates in his characteristically lighthearted style, "range from what might be called golden oldies to those with a more contemporary beat. On the playlist are the firstcause argument, the argument from design, the ontological argument, arguments from faith and biblical codes, the argument from the anthropic principle, the moral universality argument, and others." Interspersed among his twelve counterarguments are remarks on a variety of irreligious themes, ranging from the nature of miracles and creationist probability to cognitive illusions and prudential wagers. Special attention is paid to topics, arguments, and questions that spring from his incredulity "not only about religion but also about others' credulity." Despite the strong influence of his day job, Paulos says, there isn't a single mathematical formula in the book.

Synopsis:

Are there any logical reasons to believe in God? The mathematician and bestselling author John Allen Paulos thinks not. In Irreligion he presents the case for his own worldview, organizing his book into twelve chapters that refute the twelve arguments most often put forward for believing in Gods existence. Interspersed among these counterarguments are remarks on a variety of irreligious themes, ranging from the nature of miracles and creationist probability to cognitive illusions and prudential wagers. Despite the strong influence of his day job, Paulos says, there isnt a single mathematical formula in the book.

About the Author

John Allen Paulos  is a professor of mathematics at Temple University. His books include the bestseller Innumeracy: Mathematical Illiteracy and Its Consequences (H&W, 1988), A Mathematician Plays the Stock Market, and A Mathematician Reads the Newspapers.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780809059195
Subtitle:
A Mathematician Explains Why the Arguments for God Just Don't Add Up
Author:
Paulos, John Allen
Publisher:
Hill and Wang
Subject:
General Religion
Subject:
God
Subject:
Atheism
Subject:
General science
Subject:
General
Subject:
Religion & Science
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
December 2007
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Index
Pages:
176
Dimensions:
7.31 x 5.5 x 0.87 in

Other books you might like

  1. The Little Book of Atheist Spirituality Used Hardcover $4.50
  2. The Dangerous Book for Boys
    Used Hardcover $8.50
  3. Kant: Religion Within the Boundaries... New Trade Paper $32.75
  4. Nothing: Something to Believe in Used Trade Paper $2.50
  5. Cambridge Companions to Philosophy:... Used Trade Paper $17.50
  6. How to Read Nietzsche (How to Read) Used Trade Paper $3.95

Related Subjects


Humanities » Philosophy » Atheism and Humanism
Reference » Science Reference » General

Irreligion: A Mathematician Explains Why the Arguments for God Just Don't Add Up Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.95 In Stock
Product details 176 pages Hill and Wang - English 9780809059195 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Few of the recent books on atheism have been worth reading just for wit and style, but this is one of them: Paulos is truly funny. De-spite the title, the Temple University math professor doesn't actually discuss mathematics much, which will be a relief to any numerically challenged readers who felt intimidated by his previous book Innumeracy: Mathematical Illiteracy and Its Consequences. In this short primer ('just the gist with an occasional jest'), Paulos tackles 12 of the most common arguments for God, including the argument from design, the idea that a 'moral universality' points to a creator God, the notion of first causes and the argument from coincidence, among others. Along the way, he intersperses irreverent and entertaining little chapterlets that contain his musings on various subjects, including a rather hilarious imagined IM exchange with God that slyly parodies Neale Donald Walsch's Conversations with God. 'Why does solemnity tend to infect almost all discussions of religion?' Paulos asks, clearly bemoaning the dearth of humor. This little book goes a long way toward correcting the problem, and provides both atheists and religious apologists some digestible food for thought along the way." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Are there any logical reasons to believe in God? Mathematician and bestselling author Paulos thinks not. In "Irreligion" he presents the case for his own worldview, organizing his book into 12 chapters that refute the 12 arguments most often put forward for believing in Gods existence.
"Synopsis" by ,
A Lifelong Unbeliever Finds No Reason to Change His Mind

 

Are there any logical reasons to believe in God? Mathematician and bestselling author John Allen Paulos thinks not. In Irreligion he presents the case for his own worldview, organizing his book into twelve chapters that refute the twelve arguments most often put forward for believing in God's existence. The latter arguments, Paulos relates in his characteristically lighthearted style, "range from what might be called golden oldies to those with a more contemporary beat. On the playlist are the firstcause argument, the argument from design, the ontological argument, arguments from faith and biblical codes, the argument from the anthropic principle, the moral universality argument, and others." Interspersed among his twelve counterarguments are remarks on a variety of irreligious themes, ranging from the nature of miracles and creationist probability to cognitive illusions and prudential wagers. Special attention is paid to topics, arguments, and questions that spring from his incredulity "not only about religion but also about others' credulity." Despite the strong influence of his day job, Paulos says, there isn't a single mathematical formula in the book.

"Synopsis" by ,
Are there any logical reasons to believe in God? The mathematician and bestselling author John Allen Paulos thinks not. In Irreligion he presents the case for his own worldview, organizing his book into twelve chapters that refute the twelve arguments most often put forward for believing in Gods existence. Interspersed among these counterarguments are remarks on a variety of irreligious themes, ranging from the nature of miracles and creationist probability to cognitive illusions and prudential wagers. Despite the strong influence of his day job, Paulos says, there isnt a single mathematical formula in the book.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.