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Other titles in the Southern Dissent series:

I Tremble for My Country: Thomas Jefferson and the Virginia Gentry (Southern Dissent)

I Tremble for My Country: Thomas Jefferson and the Virginia Gentry (Southern Dissent) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Hatzenbuehler argues that Jefferson, though celebrated as a nationalist, is best understood as a member of the Virginia gentry who viewed the nation through the lens of his native country, the Commonwealth of Virginia. Throughout his life, Jefferson was torn between his participation in a privileged order and his periodic dissent from the order's ways. In taking Virginians to task for their failure to improve Virginia society, he masked his own reluctance to make fundamental changes in his life. The zenith of Jefferson's criticism came in Notes on the State of Virginia, where he chided his fellow Virginians for failing to take advantage of the opportunities that independence from Great Britain promised-including writing a new state constitution, establishing religious freedom, educating all of the state's youth, farming grains instead of planting tobacco, and abolishing slavery. The height of his withdrawal from the commitment to the change he advocated came after his presidency, when he allowed his gentry culture to ensnare him. The author also investigates specific issues of contention in the Jefferson literature, among them Jefferson's reliance on the writings of early Virginian writers and George Mason in drafting Summary View of the Rights of British America and the Declaration of Independence, the influence of the great French Encyclopedie on his composition of Notes on the State of Virginia, his authorship of the Kentucky Resolutions, his unfulfilled revolution as president, and the timing of the creation of the University of Virginia. Carefully drawing on Jefferson's voluminous correspondence, Hatzenbuehler does not shy away from the Founding Father's failings butfinds much to admire.

Synopsis:

andquot;A fine book and a worthy addition to the literature.andquot;--Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

and#160;

andquot;Casts fresh light on this Herculean American figure.andquot;--North Carolina Historical Review

and#160;

andquot;A welcome step away from the routine of Jefferson bashing. Hatzenbuehler does not hold back from exposing Jefferson's failure to live up to noble pronouncements found scattered throughout his life, but . . . seeks to place Jefferson's theory and actions in the more significant context of the political culture of the tobacco-growing, debt-ridden, slave-owning aristocracy of Virginia's gentry class.andquot;--Journal of American History

and#160;

andquot;Especially after his retirement from the presidency, Jefferson's identification with the Virginia elite grew deeper. He retreated from some of the nationalistic and idealistic positions he had earlier embraced and lost a burning desire to reform Virginia society. . . . This balanced and subtle study is a welcome addition to Jefferson scholarship.andquot;--American Historical Review

and#160;

andquot;Engaging and enjoyable, and many of its arguments are of special interest to Jefferson scholars. The book's literary style will likely appeal to general readers, who will learn much from this thought-provoking reexamination of Thomas Jefferson as person, not national founder.andquot;--Journal of Southern History

and#160;

and#160;

About the Author

Ronald L. Hatzenbuehler, professor of history at Idaho State University, is the author (with Robert L. Ivie) of Congress Declares War: Rhetoric, Leadership, and Partisanship in the Early Republic.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780813033839
Subtitle:
Thomas Jefferson and the Virginia Gentry
Publisher:
University Press of Florida
Author:
Hatzenbuehler, Ronald L.
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
United States - Revolutionary War
Subject:
Presidents & Heads of State
Subject:
US History-Revolution and Constitution Era
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
Southern Dissent
Publication Date:
20090315
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
6 bandw photos, 2 tables, notes, bibliog
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 0.76 lb

Related Subjects

Biography » Presidents and Heads of State
History and Social Science » American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » US History » Revolution and Constitution Era

I Tremble for My Country: Thomas Jefferson and the Virginia Gentry (Southern Dissent)
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 224 pages University Press of Florida - English 9780813033839 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

andquot;A fine book and a worthy addition to the literature.andquot;--Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

and#160;

andquot;Casts fresh light on this Herculean American figure.andquot;--North Carolina Historical Review

and#160;

andquot;A welcome step away from the routine of Jefferson bashing. Hatzenbuehler does not hold back from exposing Jefferson's failure to live up to noble pronouncements found scattered throughout his life, but . . . seeks to place Jefferson's theory and actions in the more significant context of the political culture of the tobacco-growing, debt-ridden, slave-owning aristocracy of Virginia's gentry class.andquot;--Journal of American History

and#160;

andquot;Especially after his retirement from the presidency, Jefferson's identification with the Virginia elite grew deeper. He retreated from some of the nationalistic and idealistic positions he had earlier embraced and lost a burning desire to reform Virginia society. . . . This balanced and subtle study is a welcome addition to Jefferson scholarship.andquot;--American Historical Review

and#160;

andquot;Engaging and enjoyable, and many of its arguments are of special interest to Jefferson scholars. The book's literary style will likely appeal to general readers, who will learn much from this thought-provoking reexamination of Thomas Jefferson as person, not national founder.andquot;--Journal of Southern History

and#160;

and#160;

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