Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


The Powell's Playlist | August 6, 2014

Graham Joyce: IMG The Powell’s Playlist: Graham Joyce



The Ghost in the Electric Blue Suit is set on the English coast in the hot summer of 1976, so the music in this playlist is pretty much all from the... Continue »
  1. $17.47 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

spacer

This item may be
out of stock.

Click on the button below to search for this title in other formats.


Check for Availability
Add to Wishlist

Warrior Women: The Amazons Of Dahomey And The Nature Of War

Warrior Women: The Amazons Of Dahomey And The Nature Of War
 Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Some prominent anthropologists have been joined by an eminent military historian in declaring that military combat - at all times and in all places - has been a male activity. They advance many reasons for this pattern, some more plausible than others. In fact, although warfare is typically conducted by men, in various places and at various times, women have fought bravely and well, and in the West African kingdom of Dahomey during the nineteenth century, they formed the elite corps of a successful army. Many European visitors to Dahomey commented favorably on their military bearing, finding them more impressive in discipline and maneuver than male Dahomean soldiers. When France invaded Dahomey in the early 1890s, their superior weapons won the war but all those French officers and men who wrote about their bloody battles against Dahomey declared not only that these women warriors were superior to male Dahomean soldiers, but that they were the equal of the French. Edgerton describes the history of these ”Amazon,” as they became known, their recruitment, training, and battle experience. Of particular interest to scholars interested in culture and gender today, these women believed that in order for them to carry out their martial roles, they had to transform themselves into men. How this was done, how the Amazons lived and fought, and what their experiences might mean for the understanding of women and warfare both in the past and present day are the subjects of this book.

Book News Annotation:

In the West African Kingdom of Dahomey large parts of the professional standing army was composed of women who were acknowledged by many to be better soldiers than their Dahomean male counterparts and at least the equals of their 19th century French foes. Edgerton (anthropology, U. of California) examines their rise to military prominence beginning with the founding of an exclusively female palace guard for the Dahomean King and explores the implications of this for theories of the existence of gender hierarchies.
Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

When looking for historical examples of women who have fought as soldiers, one can refer—with disappointment—to the words of John Keegan, one of the worlds most well-known military historians: “Women look to men to protect them from danger, and bitterly reproach them when they fail as defenders…Women do not fight.”In this book, anthropologist and historian Robert Edgerton disagrees, taking as his centerpiece the women warriors of Dahomey, a West African kingdom that reached its heyday during the height of the African slave trade. In this land (now the Republic of Benin), women eventually became the elite force of the kingdoms standing army, the prime fighting force faced by the French when they defeated and colonized the region in the 1890s. This book is both a narrative history of these women and their role in Dahomian society as well as a more far-ranging refutation of the argument that warfare has always been a club “for men only.”

About the Author

Author of over twenty books on sociology and anthropology, including The End of the Asante Empire and The Cloak of Competence, Robert B. Edgerton teaches at the UCLA School of Medicine.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780813337111
Subtitle:
The Amazons Of Dahomey And The Nature Of War
Author:
Edgerton, Robert B.
Author:
Edgerton, Robert
Publisher:
Basic Books
Location:
Boulder, Colo.
Subject:
Africa
Subject:
Military - General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Psychological aspects
Subject:
Women's Studies - History
Subject:
Women soldiers
Subject:
Benin
Subject:
Africa - General
Subject:
Women, Fon
Subject:
Military - Other
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series Volume:
00-R12
Publication Date:
20000622
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
216
Dimensions:
9.00 x 6.00 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Africa » West Africa
History and Social Science » Feminist Studies » History

Warrior Women: The Amazons Of Dahomey And The Nature Of War
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 216 pages Basic Books - English 9780813337111 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
When looking for historical examples of women who have fought as soldiers, one can refer—with disappointment—to the words of John Keegan, one of the worlds most well-known military historians: “Women look to men to protect them from danger, and bitterly reproach them when they fail as defenders…Women do not fight.”In this book, anthropologist and historian Robert Edgerton disagrees, taking as his centerpiece the women warriors of Dahomey, a West African kingdom that reached its heyday during the height of the African slave trade. In this land (now the Republic of Benin), women eventually became the elite force of the kingdoms standing army, the prime fighting force faced by the French when they defeated and colonized the region in the 1890s. This book is both a narrative history of these women and their role in Dahomian society as well as a more far-ranging refutation of the argument that warfare has always been a club “for men only.”
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.