Star Wars Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN!

Weekly drawing for $100 credit. Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

More at Powell's


Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | June 20, 2014

Lisa Howorth: IMG So Many Books, So Many Writers



I'm not a bookseller, but I'm married to one, and Square Books is a family. And we all know about families and how hard it is to disassociate... Continue »
  1. $18.20 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Flying Shoes

    Lisa Howorth 9781620403013

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$5.95
List price: $31.25
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Russia- Soviet States Post 1985
1 Local Warehouse Russia- Soviet States Post 1985

More copies of this ISBN

This title in other editions

Changing Channels: Television and the Struggle for Power in Russia

by

Changing Channels: Television and the Struggle for Power in Russia Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

New in paperback

Revised and expanded

During the tumultuous 1990s, as Russia struggled to shed the trappings of the Soviet empire, television viewing emerged as an enormous influence on Russian life. The number of viewers who routinely watch the nightly news in Russia matches the number of Americans who tune in to the Super Bowl, thus making TV coverage the prized asset for which political leaders intensely—and sometimes violently—compete. In this revised and expanded edition of Changing Channels, Ellen Mickiewicz provides many fascinating insights, describing the knowing ways in which ordinary Russians watch the news, skeptically analyze information, and develop strategies for dealing with news bias.

Covering the period from the state-controlled television broadcasts at the end of the Soviet Union through the attempted coup against Gorbachev, the war in Chechnya, the presidential election of 1996, and the economic collapse of 1998, Mickiewicz draws on firsthand research, public opinion surveys, and many interviews with key players, including Gorbachev himself. By examining the role that television has played in the struggle to create political pluralism in Russia, she reveals how this struggle is both helped and hindered by the barrage of information, advertisements, and media-created personalities that populate the airwaves. Perhaps most significantly, she shows how television has emerged as the sole emblem of legitimate authority and has provided a rare and much-needed connection from one area of this huge, crisis-laden country to the next.

This new edition of Changing Channels will be valued by those interested in Russian studies, politics, media and communications, and cultural studies, as well as general readers who desire an up-to-date view of crucial developments in Russia at the end of the twentieth century.

Synopsis:

"From the days when Leonid Brezhnev clung to power through the tumult of Mikhail Gorbachev and the election victories of Boris Yeltsin, Russian leaders have struggled over the control of television. In this fine and penetrating book, Ellen Mickiewicz traces those struggles and examines the larger question still ahead: whether a free and independent television can emerge that will bolster prospects for a stable, democratic nation. No one else has better captured this important saga."--David Gergen, Editor at Large, "U.S. News & World Report

"

Synopsis:

"It is difficult to imagine a more fair and thorough chronicle of television's role in Russia's ongoing evolution."--Phil Kloer, tv critic, "The Atlanta Journal-Constitution"

Synopsis:

The role television has played, and continues to play, in Russia’s transition to democracy.

Synopsis:

By examining the role that television has played in the struggle to create political pluralism in Russia, she reveals how this struggle is both helped and hindered by the barrage of information, advertisements, and media-created personalities that populate the airwaves. Perhaps most significantly, she shows how television has emerged as the sole emblem of legitimate authority and has provided a rare and much-needed connection from one area of this huge, crisis-laden country to the next. This new edition of "Changing Channels" will be valued by those interested in Russian studies, politics, media and communications, and cultural studies, as well as general readers who desire an up-to-date view of crucial developments in Russia at the end of the twentieth century.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [305]-349) and index.

About the Author

“A riveting look at the political struggle for control of television [in] the Soviet Union. . . . The policy debates detailed in Changing Channels have universal application to our digital communications future. They are explained with skill and competence by an author who is intimately acquainted with both the issues and the people involved.”—Bruce Christensen, former President and CEO of PBS
“An important and fascinating story, elegantly told by Ellen Mickiewicz.”—Stephen Hess, author of International News & Foreign Correspondents
“For those who care about Russia’s stormy evolution from dictatorship to democracy, here is an important story—the first extensive account of the crucially important revolution in Moscow television since 1985.”—Hedrick Smith, author of The New Russians
“From the days when Leonid Brezhnev clung to power through the tumult of Mikhail Gorbachev and the election victories of Boris Yeltsin, Russian leaders have struggled over the control of television. In this fine and penetrating book, Ellen Mickiewicz traces those struggles and examines the larger question still ahead: whether a free and independent television can emerge that will bolster prospects for a stable, democratic nation. No one else has better captured this important saga.”—David Gergen, Editor at Large, U.S. News & World Report
“It is difficult to imagine a more fair and thorough chronicle of television’s role in Russia’s ongoing evolution.”—Phil Kloer, tv critic, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
“This book will enthrall and enlighten its readers with its vivid revelations of political stratagems by politicians and journalists. . . . This is a definitive study, based on lengthy interviews with the movers and shakers in the world of politics and television by a brilliant participant/observer of the momentous changes-in-the-making.”—Doris A. Graber, University of Illinois at Chicago
“When Ellen Mickiewicz combines her years of on-scene experience, range of contacts, academic credentials, and writing skill to address the subject of media power in Russia, the result makes must reading for anyone interested in today’s Russian power struggle—or the central role of media control in every society.”—Nicholas Johnson, former Commissioner, U.S. Federal Communications Commission
“[A] deep and detailed look at a long and occasionally fatal obsession with television’s power on the part of Russia’s political leaders.”—Ron Aldridge, Publisher & Editorial Director, Electronic Media

Product Details

ISBN:
9780822324638
Author:
Mickiewicz, Ellen Propper
Publisher:
Duke University Press
Author:
Mickiewicz
Author:
Mickiewicz, Ellen Propper
Location:
Durham, N.C. :
Subject:
Sociology - Social Theory
Subject:
Russia (pre & post Soviet Union)
Subject:
Soviet Union
Subject:
Television - History & Criticism
Subject:
Television broadcasting
Subject:
Television and politics
Subject:
Europe - Russia & the Former Soviet Union
Subject:
Television and politics -- Russia (Federation)
Subject:
Television and politics -- Soviet Union.
Subject:
Film and Television-Media Studies
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series Volume:
22
Publication Date:
19990931
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
33 b&w photographs, 8 tables
Pages:
408
Dimensions:
9.23x6.18x1.21 in. 1.53 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. How the Soviet Union Is Governed New Hardcover $83.25
  2. The Rise and Fall of Athens: Nine... Used Trade Paper $3.95
  3. The Epic of Gilgamesh Used Trade Paper $7.95
  4. Split Signals: Television and... New Trade Paper $38.50
  5. Stalin's Successors: Leadership,... New Trade Paper $73.50

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Media Studies
History and Social Science » Russia » General Russian History
History and Social Science » Russia » Soviet States Post 1985
History and Social Science » Sociology » General

Changing Channels: Television and the Struggle for Power in Russia Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.95 In Stock
Product details 408 pages Duke University Press - English 9780822324638 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "From the days when Leonid Brezhnev clung to power through the tumult of Mikhail Gorbachev and the election victories of Boris Yeltsin, Russian leaders have struggled over the control of television. In this fine and penetrating book, Ellen Mickiewicz traces those struggles and examines the larger question still ahead: whether a free and independent television can emerge that will bolster prospects for a stable, democratic nation. No one else has better captured this important saga."--David Gergen, Editor at Large, "U.S. News & World Report

"

"Synopsis" by , "It is difficult to imagine a more fair and thorough chronicle of television's role in Russia's ongoing evolution."--Phil Kloer, tv critic, "The Atlanta Journal-Constitution"
"Synopsis" by ,
The role television has played, and continues to play, in Russia’s transition to democracy.
"Synopsis" by , By examining the role that television has played in the struggle to create political pluralism in Russia, she reveals how this struggle is both helped and hindered by the barrage of information, advertisements, and media-created personalities that populate the airwaves. Perhaps most significantly, she shows how television has emerged as the sole emblem of legitimate authority and has provided a rare and much-needed connection from one area of this huge, crisis-laden country to the next. This new edition of "Changing Channels" will be valued by those interested in Russian studies, politics, media and communications, and cultural studies, as well as general readers who desire an up-to-date view of crucial developments in Russia at the end of the twentieth century.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.