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1 Local Warehouse Ethnic Studies- Chinese American

This title in other editions

Other titles in the Politics, History, and Culture series:

Paper Families: Identity, Immigration Administration, and Chinese Exclusion (Politics, History, and Culture)

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Paper Families: Identity, Immigration Administration, and Chinese Exclusion (Politics, History, and Culture) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 made the Chinese the first immigrant group officially excluded from the United States. In Paper Families, Estelle T. Lau demonstrates how exclusion affected Chinese American communities and initiated the development of restrictive U.S. immigration policies and practices. Through the enforcement of the Exclusion Act and subsequent legislation, the U.S. immigration service developed new forms of record keeping and identification practices. Meanwhile, Chinese Americans took advantage of the systemandrsquo;s loophole: children of U.S. citizens were granted automatic eligibility for immigration. The result was an elaborate system of andldquo;paper families,andrdquo; in which U.S. citizens of Chinese descent claimed fictive, or andldquo;paper,andrdquo; children who could then use their kinship status as a basis for entry into the United States. This subterfuge necessitated the creation of andldquo;crib sheetsandrdquo; outlining genealogies and providing village maps and other information that could be used during immigration processing.

Drawing on these documents as well as immigration case files, legislative materials, and transcripts of interviews and court proceedings, Lau reveals immigration as an interactive process. Chinese immigrants and their U.S. families were subject to regulation and surveillance, but they also manipulated and thwarted those regulations, forcing the U.S. government to adapt its practices and policies. Lau points out that the Exclusion Acts and the pseudo-familial structures that emerged in response have had lasting effects on Chinese American identity. She concludes with a look at exclusionandrsquo;s legacy, including the Confession Program of the 1960s that coerced people into divulging the names of paper family members and efforts made by Chinese American communities to recover their lost family histories.

Synopsis:

"This is a wonderfully nuanced case study of the formative period in U.S. immigration policy between the Civil War and the end of World War II. Estelle T. Lau highlights how immigrant identity formation was a two-way process involving both the immigrants and the relentless efforts of immigration officials to exclude them. She deftly and incisively uses her case study to illuminate the evolution of U.S. immigration policy overall."--Edward O. Laumann, George Herbert Mead Distinguished Service Professor of Sociology, University of Chicago

Synopsis:

Cultural and legal study of the Chinese Exclusion Acts, which restrictedChinese immigration into the U.S., and the efforts of immigrants to circumvent these policies through the creation of fictive families.

Synopsis:

A look at how the Chinese Exclusion Act and later legislation affected Chinese American communities, who created fictitious "paper families" to subvert immigration policies.

About the Author

Estelle T. Lau is a practicing attorney and an independent scholar. She has a doctorate in sociology from the University of Chicago and a law degree from Harvard University.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780822337478
Author:
Lau, Estelle T
Publisher:
Duke University Press
Author:
Lau, Estelle T.
Author:
Steinmetz, George
Author:
Adams, Julia
Subject:
General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Immigrants
Subject:
Immigrants -- United States -- History.
Subject:
United States Race relations.
Subject:
General History
Subject:
World History-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
Politics, History, and Culture
Publication Date:
20070331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
6 illustrations, 1 table
Pages:
232
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Asian American
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Chinese American
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Paper Families: Identity, Immigration Administration, and Chinese Exclusion (Politics, History, and Culture) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 232 pages Duke University Press - English 9780822337478 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "This is a wonderfully nuanced case study of the formative period in U.S. immigration policy between the Civil War and the end of World War II. Estelle T. Lau highlights how immigrant identity formation was a two-way process involving both the immigrants and the relentless efforts of immigration officials to exclude them. She deftly and incisively uses her case study to illuminate the evolution of U.S. immigration policy overall."--Edward O. Laumann, George Herbert Mead Distinguished Service Professor of Sociology, University of Chicago
"Synopsis" by ,
Cultural and legal study of the Chinese Exclusion Acts, which restrictedChinese immigration into the U.S., and the efforts of immigrants to circumvent these policies through the creation of fictive families.
"Synopsis" by ,
A look at how the Chinese Exclusion Act and later legislation affected Chinese American communities, who created fictitious "paper families" to subvert immigration policies.
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