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Ill Take You There: Pop Music and the Urge for Transcendence

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Ill Take You There: Pop Music and the Urge for Transcendence Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The urge to connect with that which transcends our experience, be it a higher power, another person or some artistic ideal or aspect of nature, is one of the things that makes us human. People view the object of this quest, as well as what it means to achieve it, differently. Yet regardless of how it is understood, the urge to participate in or belong to something greater and more lasting than ourselves—a feeling born of an awareness of our mortality—is what defines us as spiritual beings. Though often dismissed as ephemeral or, worse, demonic, popular music has given voice to this quest for transcendence since its beginnings. Pop singers are rarely as outwardly spiritual as, say, their gospel counterparts; they're forever pointing beyond themselves, though, be it to some better future, some higher ideal, or to some vision of deliverance. Fontella Bass's "Rescue Me," the Four Tops's "Reach Out (I'll Be There)," Jimmy Cliff's "Many Rivers to Cross," Afrika Bambaataa's "Looking for the Perfect Beat," and U2's "I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For" are but a handful of popular recordings from the past few decades that express a longing for something more. What, other than transcendence, is Jimi Hendrix talking about in "Purple Haze" when he shouts, "'scuse me, while I kiss the sky"? Or Van Morrison, in "Caravan," when he implores us to crank our radios and sail away with him into the mystic? Heard in the right light, secular and even carnal records have the power to speak to transcendental concerns, galvanizing their historical and cultural moments. Regardless of their spiritual leanings, all of the subjects discussed in this book (including Public Enemy, Madonna, Sleater-Kinney, Tricky, Johnny Cash, Nine Inch Nails, Moby, Marvin Gaye, Eminem, Polly Harvey, Bruce Springsteen and Sly and the Family Stone) make music that expresses a basic striving for transcendence. Artists' stories and personalities inform these discussions, but only in as much as they illuminate the struggles and concerns that run through their music. I'll Take You There is a beautifully written, wide-ranging and illuminating examination of some of the most potent popular music ever recorded.

Book News Annotation:

Friskics-Warren analyzes elements of transcendence in pop songs by approximately 30 artists, interpreting their songs and careers through many concepts, from empathy, sensuality, and antipathy to solidarity and resistance. He examines music by Van Morrison, P.M. Dawn, Al Green, Marvin Gaye, Madonna, PJ Harvey, Sinéad O'Connor, Moby, Nine Inch Nails, the Sex Pistols, Eminem, Johnny Cash, U2, Public Enemy, Sleater-Kinney, and Bikini Kill, among others. Friskics-Warren is a writer and editor.
Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Book News Annotation:

Friskics-Warren analyzes elements of transcendence in pop songs by approximately 30 artists, interpreting their songs and careers through many concepts, from empathy, sensuality, and antipathy to solidarity and resistance. He examines music by Van Morrison, P.M. Dawn, Al Green, Marvin Gaye, Madonna, PJ Harvey, Sinéad O'Connor, Moby, Nine Inch Nails, the Sex Pistols, Eminem, Johnny Cash, U2, Public Enemy, Sleater-Kinney, and Bikini Kill, among others. Friskics-Warren is a writer and editor. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

The urge to connect with that which transcends our experience, be it a higher power, another person or some aspect of nature, is one of the things that makes us human. People view the object of this quest differently, as well as what it means to achieve or experience it. Yet regardless of how its understood, the urge to participate in or belong to something greater and more lasting than ourselvesa feeling born of an awareness of our mortality is what defines us as spiritual beings. Though often dismissed as ephemeral or, worse, satanic, popular music has given voice to this quest for transcendence since its beginnings.

Synopsis:

The urge to connect with that which transcends our experience, be it a higher power, another person or some artistic ideal or aspect of nature, is one of the things that makes us human. People view the object of this quest, as well as what it means to achieve it, differently. Yet regardless of how it is understood, the urge to participate in or belong to something greater and more lasting than ourselves—a feeling born of an awareness of our mortality—is what defines us as spiritual beings.

Though often dismissed as ephemeral or, worse, demonic, popular music has given voice to this quest for transcendence since its beginnings. Pop singers are rarely as outwardly spiritual as, say, their gospel counterparts; they're forever pointing beyond themselves, though, be it to some better future, some higher ideal, or to some vision of deliverance. Fontella Bass's "Rescue Me," the Four Tops's "Reach Out (I'll Be There)," Jimmy Cliff's "Many Rivers to Cross," Afrika Bambaataa's "Looking for the Perfect Beat," and U2's "I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For" are but a handful of popular recordings from the past few decades that express a longing for something more. What, other than transcendence, is Jimi Hendrix talking about in "Purple Haze" when he shouts, "'scuse me, while I kiss the sky"? Or Van Morrison, in "Caravan," when he implores us to crank our radios and sail away with him into the mystic? Heard in the right light, secular and even carnal records have the power to speak to transcendental concerns, galvanizing their historical and cultural moments.

Regardless of their spiritual leanings, all of the subjects discussed in this book (including Public Enemy, Madonna, Sleater-Kinney, Tricky, Johnny Cash, Nine Inch Nails, Moby, Marvin Gaye, Eminem, Polly Harvey, Bruce Springsteen and Sly and the Family Stone) make music that expresses a basic striving for transcendence. Artists' stories and personalities inform these discussions, but only in as much as they illuminate the struggles and concerns that run through their music. I'll Take You There is a beautifully written, wide-ranging and illuminating examination of some of the most potent popular music ever recorded.

Synopsis:

The urge to participate in or belong to something greater and more lasting than oneself is what defines humans as spiritual beings. Though often dismissed as ephemeral or, worse, satanic, popular music has given voice to this quest for transcendence since its beginnings.

Table of Contents

CONTENTSAuthor's Note and AcknowledgmentsPrologue...I Want to Take You HigherIntroduction...Cleaning Windows: Restlessness, Records, and TranscendenceSection I...Mystics: Contemplatives, Sensualists, and EmpathsChapter 1...Dwellers on the Threshold: Van Morrison, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, and P.M. DawnChapter 2...Sexual Healing, or Something Like Sanctified: Marvin Gaye, Al Green, Madonna, and PJ HarveyChapter 3...My Love I Bring: Sinead O'Connor, Buddy and Julie Miller, and MobySection II...Naysayers: Dystopians and "Idiots"Chapter 4...The Great Wrong Place in Which We Live: Nine Inch Nails, Tricky, Joy Division, and New OrderChapter 5...License to Ill: The Stooges, the Sex Pistols, PiL, and EminemSection III...Prophets: Voices of Uplift, Resistance, and PossibilityChapter 6...Keep on Pushing: Curtis Mayfield, Johnny Cash, and U2Chapter 7...Fight the Power: Spearhead, the Mekons, and Public EnemyChapter 8...Dance to the Music: Sly and the Family Stone, Bikini Kill, Liberation Rock, Sleater-Kinney, and Le TigreEpilogue...Hungry Heart Bruce SpringsteenNotesBibliographySelected DiscographyIndex

Product Details

ISBN:
9780826417008
Subtitle:
Pop Music and the Urge for Transcendence
Author:
Friskics Warren, Bil
Author:
Friskics-Warren, Bill
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Academic
Subject:
General
Subject:
Philosophy
Subject:
Music
Subject:
Popular music
Subject:
Genres & Styles - Pop Vocal
Subject:
Instruction & Study - Theory
Subject:
Music -- Philosophy and aesthetics.
Subject:
Popular music -- History and criticism.
Subject:
Music-Popular Performers
Subject:
General Music
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20050912
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
9.22 x 6.36 x 1.09 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » General
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Pop Vocal
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Rock » History
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Rock » Reference and Criticism
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Instruction and Study » Theory
Religion » Eastern Religions » Philosophy General

Ill Take You There: Pop Music and the Urge for Transcendence Used Hardcover
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Product details 272 pages Continuum International Publishing Group - English 9780826417008 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The urge to connect with that which transcends our experience, be it a higher power, another person or some aspect of nature, is one of the things that makes us human. People view the object of this quest differently, as well as what it means to achieve or experience it. Yet regardless of how its understood, the urge to participate in or belong to something greater and more lasting than ourselvesa feeling born of an awareness of our mortality is what defines us as spiritual beings. Though often dismissed as ephemeral or, worse, satanic, popular music has given voice to this quest for transcendence since its beginnings.
"Synopsis" by ,
The urge to connect with that which transcends our experience, be it a higher power, another person or some artistic ideal or aspect of nature, is one of the things that makes us human. People view the object of this quest, as well as what it means to achieve it, differently. Yet regardless of how it is understood, the urge to participate in or belong to something greater and more lasting than ourselves—a feeling born of an awareness of our mortality—is what defines us as spiritual beings.

Though often dismissed as ephemeral or, worse, demonic, popular music has given voice to this quest for transcendence since its beginnings. Pop singers are rarely as outwardly spiritual as, say, their gospel counterparts; they're forever pointing beyond themselves, though, be it to some better future, some higher ideal, or to some vision of deliverance. Fontella Bass's "Rescue Me," the Four Tops's "Reach Out (I'll Be There)," Jimmy Cliff's "Many Rivers to Cross," Afrika Bambaataa's "Looking for the Perfect Beat," and U2's "I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For" are but a handful of popular recordings from the past few decades that express a longing for something more. What, other than transcendence, is Jimi Hendrix talking about in "Purple Haze" when he shouts, "'scuse me, while I kiss the sky"? Or Van Morrison, in "Caravan," when he implores us to crank our radios and sail away with him into the mystic? Heard in the right light, secular and even carnal records have the power to speak to transcendental concerns, galvanizing their historical and cultural moments.

Regardless of their spiritual leanings, all of the subjects discussed in this book (including Public Enemy, Madonna, Sleater-Kinney, Tricky, Johnny Cash, Nine Inch Nails, Moby, Marvin Gaye, Eminem, Polly Harvey, Bruce Springsteen and Sly and the Family Stone) make music that expresses a basic striving for transcendence. Artists' stories and personalities inform these discussions, but only in as much as they illuminate the struggles and concerns that run through their music. I'll Take You There is a beautifully written, wide-ranging and illuminating examination of some of the most potent popular music ever recorded.

"Synopsis" by , The urge to participate in or belong to something greater and more lasting than oneself is what defines humans as spiritual beings. Though often dismissed as ephemeral or, worse, satanic, popular music has given voice to this quest for transcendence since its beginnings.
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