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No Time to Think: The Menace of Media Speed and the 24-Hour News Cycle

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No Time to Think: The Menace of Media Speed and the 24-Hour News Cycle Cover

ISBN13: 9780826429315
ISBN10: 0826429319
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

<strong>An eviscerating look at the state of journalism in the age of the 24 hour news cycle by a Pulitzer Prize-winning television critic and a veteran news correspondent.</strong> <br/><br/><em>No Time To Think</em> focuses on the insidious and increasing portion of the news media that, due to the dangerously extreme speed at which it is produced, is only half thought out, half true, and lazily repeated from anonymous sources interested in selling opinion and wild speculation as news.  These news item can easily gain exposure today, assuming a life of their own while making a mockery of journalism and creating casualties of cool deliberation and thoughtful discourse.  Much of it is picked up gratuitously and given resonance online or through CNN, Fox News, MSNBC and other networks, which must, in this age of the 24-hour news cycle, "feed the beast." <br/><br/><br/><div></div><br/><div>In dissecting this frantic news blur, <em>No Time to Think</em> breaks down a number of speed-driven blunders from the insider perspective of Charles Feldman, who spent 20 years as a CNN correspondent, as well as the outsider perspective of Howard Rosenberg, who covered the coverage for 25 years as TV critic for <em>The Los Angeles Times</em>. </div><br/><div><br/><em>No Time to Think</em> demonstrates how today's media blitz scrambles the public's perspective in ways that potentially shape how we think, act and react as a global society. The end result effects not only the media and the public, but also the government leaders we trust to make carefully considered decisions on our behalf.  Featuring interviews ranging from former NBC News anchor <strong>Tom Brokaw</strong> to internet doyenne <strong>Arianna Huffington</strong> to PBS stalwart <strong>Jim Lehrer</strong> to CNN chief <strong>Jonathan Klein</strong> to a host of former presidential press secretaries and other keen-eyed media watchers, this incisive work measures lasting fallout from the 24-hour news cycle beginning in 1980 with the arrival of CNN, right up to the present. </div>>

Review:

"Pulitzer Prize winner Rosenberg teams with veteran journalist Feldman to argue that the 24-hour news cycle has degraded the news media and failed consumers in this indignant, often reactionary examination. The authors' premise, that a demand for a constant flow of information via the Internet and cable news networks has led to inaccuracies in reporting, is a popular refrain and one with merit. The many quotes the authors have collected from media giants such as Jim Lehrer and Arianna Huffington present the challenges facing news outlets as changing technologies, most notably the Internet, interact with traditional media. However, the book's heavy-handed editorializing and unfocused gaze muddle the argument, and the many regressions into finger pointing and personal attacks seem out of place amongst such serious considerations. While the authors' ultimate conclusion-that consumer literacy is the best defense against biased and untrustworthy news-is well-taken, flippant dismissals of bloggers (referred to as 'nimble-fingered Crackerjacks'), multi-media reporting and alternative news sources undermine this larger point and don't provide any new answers." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Book News Annotation:

Rosenberg (a media columnist for the Los Angeles Times) and Feldman (a journalist and media consultant) critique contemporary news media. They examine newspapers, broadcast journalism, and new media (e.g. the blogs and other Internet resources). They are particularly concerned about how 24-hour cable news together with the blogs have contributed to an accelerated pace of news production and consumption that is pushing out nuance and accuracy. Annotation ©2009 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

This witty, incisiveand yes, angrywork measures lasting fallout from the 24-hour news cycle: that media mushroom cloud, released into our biosphere in 1980 with the arrival of CNN.

Synopsis:

An eviscerating look at the state of journalism in the age of the 24 hour news cycle by a Pulitzer Prize-winning television critic and a veteran news correspondent.

No Time To Think focuses on the insidious and increasing portion of the news media that, due to the dangerously extreme speed at which it is produced, is only half thought out, half true, and lazily repeated from anonymous sources interested in selling opinion and wild speculation as news.  These news item can easily gain exposure today, assuming a life of their own while making a mockery of journalism and creating casualties of cool deliberation and thoughtful discourse.  Much of it is picked up gratuitously and given resonance online or through CNN, Fox News, MSNBC and other networks, which must, in this age of the 24-hour news cycle, "feed the beast."

In dissecting this frantic news blur, No Time to Think breaks down a number of speed-driven blunders from the insider perspective of Charles Feldman, who spent 20 years as a CNN correspondent, as well as the outsider perspective of Howard Rosenberg, who covered the coverage for 25 years as TV critic for The Los Angeles Times.

No Time to Think demonstrates how today's media blitz scrambles the public's perspective in ways that potentially shape how we think, act and react as a global society. The end result effects not only the media and the public, but also the government leaders we trust to make carefully considered decisions on our behalf.  Featuring interviews ranging from former NBC News anchor Tom Brokaw to internet doyenne Arianna Huffington to PBS stalwart Jim Lehrer to CNN chief Jonathan Klein to a host of former presidential press secretaries and other keen-eyed media watchers, this incisive work measures lasting fallout from the 24-hour news cycle beginning in 1980 with the arrival of CNN, right up to the present.

Synopsis:

An eviscerating look at the state of journalism in the age of the 24 hour news cycle by a Pulitzer Prize-winning television critic and a veteran news correspondent. No Time To Think focuses on the insidious and increasing portion of the news media that, due to the dangerously extreme speed at which it is produced, is only half thought out, half true, and lazily repeated from anonymous sources interested in selling opinion and wild speculation as news.  These news item can easily gain exposure today, assuming a life of their own while making a mockery of journalism and creating casualties of cool deliberation and thoughtful discourse.  Much of it is picked up gratuitously and given resonance online or through CNN, Fox News, MSNBC and other networks, which must, in this age of the 24-hour news cycle, "feed the beast."
In dissecting this frantic news blur, No Time to Think breaks down a number of speed-driven blunders from the insider perspective of Charles Feldman, who spent 20 years as a CNN correspondent, as well as the outsider perspective of Howard Rosenberg, who covered the coverage for 25 years as TV critic for The Los Angeles Times.
No Time to Think demonstrates how today's media blitz scrambles the public's perspective in ways that potentially shape how we think, act and react as a global society. The end result effects not only the media and the public, but also the government leaders we trust to make carefully considered decisions on our behalf.  Featuring interviews ranging from former NBC News anchor Tom Brokaw to internet doyenne Arianna Huffington to PBS stalwart Jim Lehrer to CNN chief Jonathan Klein to a host of former presidential press secretaries and other keen-eyed media watchers, this incisive work measures lasting fallout from the 24-hour news cycle beginning in 1980 with the arrival of CNN, right up to the present.

Table of Contents

Prologue

1. Why Is Speed So Bad?

2. Two Revolutions: French and Mexican

3. All the News Before It Happens

4. Blog On!

5. A New Protestant Reformation: Citizen Journalists to the Rescue

6. In-depth Instant Results

7. Desperate Newspapers Play Catch-up

8. Mr. Inside and Mr. Outside: A Conversation

9. What If? Scenarios, Dark and Darker

10. 5 Grams News, 10 Grams Speculation

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

JohnnyC, November 19, 2008 (view all comments by JohnnyC)
The strength of any argument is directly related to the articulation of that argument. I'm afraid that Rosenberg and Feldman's 211 page rant fails to make a convincing argument because it is so poorly written. The book is an angry diatribe against the News industry for being seduced by speed rather than facts, predicated by the 24/7 news cycle best exemplified by CNN. This is certainly a worthy topic, but the book's narrative style, which is cross between the rhetoric of Jerry Seinfeld and the logic of Bill O'Reilly, fails to present itself in a serious way. It's full of jargon, pseudo-street talk and anger. As a result, the book offers some good examples of bad reportage and the increasing use of opinion as factual information, but if fails to connect our changing technology to the larger picture, offering at the end only a "dose of hope". Our addiction to speed is clearly related to our access and hunger for faster technologies. This book does nothing to enlighten or inform the reader beyond the superficial. A Pulizer prize winner should have done a better job.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780826429315
Author:
Rosenberg, Howard
Publisher:
Continuum
Author:
Feldman, Charles
Author:
Feldman, Charles S.
Author:
Rosenberg, Howard
Subject:
Media Studies
Subject:
Television - History & Criticism
Subject:
Journalism
Subject:
Television broadcasting of news
Subject:
Media Studies - Electronic Media
Subject:
Journalism -- Objectivity -- United States.
Subject:
Sociology-Media
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20081031
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
9.17 x 6.36 x 0.89 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Media Studies
Arts and Entertainment » Music » General
Business » Communication
Business » General
History and Social Science » Journalism » General
History and Social Science » Journalism » Media Studies
History and Social Science » Journalism » Reference
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History and Social Science » Literary History » Literary Interviews
History and Social Science » Sociology » Media

No Time to Think: The Menace of Media Speed and the 24-Hour News Cycle Used Hardcover
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$6.95 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Continuum - English 9780826429315 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Pulitzer Prize winner Rosenberg teams with veteran journalist Feldman to argue that the 24-hour news cycle has degraded the news media and failed consumers in this indignant, often reactionary examination. The authors' premise, that a demand for a constant flow of information via the Internet and cable news networks has led to inaccuracies in reporting, is a popular refrain and one with merit. The many quotes the authors have collected from media giants such as Jim Lehrer and Arianna Huffington present the challenges facing news outlets as changing technologies, most notably the Internet, interact with traditional media. However, the book's heavy-handed editorializing and unfocused gaze muddle the argument, and the many regressions into finger pointing and personal attacks seem out of place amongst such serious considerations. While the authors' ultimate conclusion-that consumer literacy is the best defense against biased and untrustworthy news-is well-taken, flippant dismissals of bloggers (referred to as 'nimble-fingered Crackerjacks'), multi-media reporting and alternative news sources undermine this larger point and don't provide any new answers." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , This witty, incisiveand yes, angrywork measures lasting fallout from the 24-hour news cycle: that media mushroom cloud, released into our biosphere in 1980 with the arrival of CNN.
"Synopsis" by ,
An eviscerating look at the state of journalism in the age of the 24 hour news cycle by a Pulitzer Prize-winning television critic and a veteran news correspondent.

No Time To Think focuses on the insidious and increasing portion of the news media that, due to the dangerously extreme speed at which it is produced, is only half thought out, half true, and lazily repeated from anonymous sources interested in selling opinion and wild speculation as news.  These news item can easily gain exposure today, assuming a life of their own while making a mockery of journalism and creating casualties of cool deliberation and thoughtful discourse.  Much of it is picked up gratuitously and given resonance online or through CNN, Fox News, MSNBC and other networks, which must, in this age of the 24-hour news cycle, "feed the beast."

In dissecting this frantic news blur, No Time to Think breaks down a number of speed-driven blunders from the insider perspective of Charles Feldman, who spent 20 years as a CNN correspondent, as well as the outsider perspective of Howard Rosenberg, who covered the coverage for 25 years as TV critic for The Los Angeles Times.

No Time to Think demonstrates how today's media blitz scrambles the public's perspective in ways that potentially shape how we think, act and react as a global society. The end result effects not only the media and the public, but also the government leaders we trust to make carefully considered decisions on our behalf.  Featuring interviews ranging from former NBC News anchor Tom Brokaw to internet doyenne Arianna Huffington to PBS stalwart Jim Lehrer to CNN chief Jonathan Klein to a host of former presidential press secretaries and other keen-eyed media watchers, this incisive work measures lasting fallout from the 24-hour news cycle beginning in 1980 with the arrival of CNN, right up to the present.

"Synopsis" by ,
An eviscerating look at the state of journalism in the age of the 24 hour news cycle by a Pulitzer Prize-winning television critic and a veteran news correspondent. No Time To Think focuses on the insidious and increasing portion of the news media that, due to the dangerously extreme speed at which it is produced, is only half thought out, half true, and lazily repeated from anonymous sources interested in selling opinion and wild speculation as news.  These news item can easily gain exposure today, assuming a life of their own while making a mockery of journalism and creating casualties of cool deliberation and thoughtful discourse.  Much of it is picked up gratuitously and given resonance online or through CNN, Fox News, MSNBC and other networks, which must, in this age of the 24-hour news cycle, "feed the beast."
In dissecting this frantic news blur, No Time to Think breaks down a number of speed-driven blunders from the insider perspective of Charles Feldman, who spent 20 years as a CNN correspondent, as well as the outsider perspective of Howard Rosenberg, who covered the coverage for 25 years as TV critic for The Los Angeles Times.
No Time to Think demonstrates how today's media blitz scrambles the public's perspective in ways that potentially shape how we think, act and react as a global society. The end result effects not only the media and the public, but also the government leaders we trust to make carefully considered decisions on our behalf.  Featuring interviews ranging from former NBC News anchor Tom Brokaw to internet doyenne Arianna Huffington to PBS stalwart Jim Lehrer to CNN chief Jonathan Klein to a host of former presidential press secretaries and other keen-eyed media watchers, this incisive work measures lasting fallout from the 24-hour news cycle beginning in 1980 with the arrival of CNN, right up to the present.
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