Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | August 21, 2014

Richard Bausch: IMG Why Literature Can Save Us



Our title is, of course, a problem. "Why Literature Can Save Us." And of course the problem is one of definition: what those words mean. What is... Continue »
  1. $18.87 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Before, During, After

    Richard Bausch 9780307266262

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$5.50
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Local Warehouse Literature- A to Z

Noon

by

Noon Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Rehan Tabassum has grown up in a world of privilege in Delhi. His mother and her new husband embody the dazzling emergent India everyone is talking about. His real father, however, is a virtual stranger to him: a Pakistani Muslim who lives across the border and owns a vast telecommunications empire called Qasimic Call.

As Rehan contemplates his future, he finds himself becoming unmoored. Leaving the familiarity of home for Pakistan in an attempt to get closer to his father, he is drawn into events he barely understands. His half brother, Isffy, is being blackmailed; his powerful fathers entourage is tearing itself apart; and the city of Port Bin Qasim, where he finds himself, is filled with rioting protestors. Moral danger lurks in every corner of this dark, shifting, and unfamiliar world.

Set against the background of a turbulent Pakistan and a rapidly changing India, Noon is a startling and powerfully charged novel from a brilliant young writer. Aatish Taseer bears witness to some of the most urgent questions of our times, questions about nationhood and violence, family and identity.

Review:

"Readers of Taseer's memoir, Stranger to History: A Son's Journey Through Islamic Lands, or his previous novel, The Temple-Goers, may be disappointed to find a shocking amount of retread in his latest. It seems less a novel than four loose vignettes from a life split between India and Pakistan, with a postcolonial emphasis on how industrial modernization has isolated the Westernized bourgeoisie from a sometimes resentful underclass. The first episode offers a snapshot from the Delhi childhood of Rehan Tabassum; the second introduces his stepfather, the seething 'man of the times' industrialist Amit Sethia; while in the third section, Rehan narrates the investigation of a burglary at the Sethias' estate in which everyone is a suspect. The book's last and strongest part finds the privileged Rehan adjusting to life in the intrigue-ridden household of his estranged Pakistani birth father, powerless to control the ingrained scandalous class fissures in the aftermath of the 2005 earthquake in Kashmir. There are incisive depictions of believers entwined with moguls beholden to American interests, but overall, while the prose has a hypnotic old-fashioned fluidity, there is a distinctly deleted-scenes feel, leaving what ought to be the most stirring characters blank and the most revealing details unarticulated. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Rehan Tabassum has grown up in a world of privilege in Delhi. His mother is a successful lawyer and her new husband is a wealthy industrialist whose way of doing business is at the heart of the New India everyone is talking about. But there is a marked absence in Rehans life: his real father, a Pakistani Muslim who owns a telecommunications empire in Pakistan. Noon follows Rehans attempts to negotiate this loss as he journeys, both physically and emotionally, toward the heart of his fathers world. From the atavistic scenes of a childhood in Delhi to the citys boom and bust; from an earthquake in Pakistan to threats of violence in the sinister city of Port Bin Qasim; from the lives of servants at home in Delhi to blackmail and menace within Rehans fathers company- this extraordinary family saga interrogates the nature of power in two changing countries. Aatish Taseer tells the story of a man who comes of age as his country does, in an atmosphere of political quicksand and moral danger.

About the Author

Aatish Taseer was born in 1980. He has worked as a reporter for Time magazine and has written for The Sunday Times (London), the Financial Times, Prospect, TAR, and Esquire. He is the author of Stranger to History: A Sons Journey Through Islamic Lands (2009) and is the highly acclaimed translator of Manto: Selected Stories (2008). His novel The Temple-Goers was shortlisted for the 2010 Costa First Novel Award. He lives in Delhi and London.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780865478589
Subtitle:
A Novel
Author:
Taseer, Aatish
Author:
Aatish Taseer
Publisher:
Faber & Faber
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20121002
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in

Other books you might like

  1. Inside Scientology: The Story of...
    Sale Trade Paper $7.98
  2. Coming Back Used Mass Market $4.95
  3. Time for Outrage: Indignez-Vous!
    Used Hardcover $5.95
  4. Reamde
    Sale Hardcover $7.98

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Noon Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.50 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Faber & Faber - English 9780865478589 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Readers of Taseer's memoir, Stranger to History: A Son's Journey Through Islamic Lands, or his previous novel, The Temple-Goers, may be disappointed to find a shocking amount of retread in his latest. It seems less a novel than four loose vignettes from a life split between India and Pakistan, with a postcolonial emphasis on how industrial modernization has isolated the Westernized bourgeoisie from a sometimes resentful underclass. The first episode offers a snapshot from the Delhi childhood of Rehan Tabassum; the second introduces his stepfather, the seething 'man of the times' industrialist Amit Sethia; while in the third section, Rehan narrates the investigation of a burglary at the Sethias' estate in which everyone is a suspect. The book's last and strongest part finds the privileged Rehan adjusting to life in the intrigue-ridden household of his estranged Pakistani birth father, powerless to control the ingrained scandalous class fissures in the aftermath of the 2005 earthquake in Kashmir. There are incisive depictions of believers entwined with moguls beholden to American interests, but overall, while the prose has a hypnotic old-fashioned fluidity, there is a distinctly deleted-scenes feel, leaving what ought to be the most stirring characters blank and the most revealing details unarticulated. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
Rehan Tabassum has grown up in a world of privilege in Delhi. His mother is a successful lawyer and her new husband is a wealthy industrialist whose way of doing business is at the heart of the New India everyone is talking about. But there is a marked absence in Rehans life: his real father, a Pakistani Muslim who owns a telecommunications empire in Pakistan. Noon follows Rehans attempts to negotiate this loss as he journeys, both physically and emotionally, toward the heart of his fathers world. From the atavistic scenes of a childhood in Delhi to the citys boom and bust; from an earthquake in Pakistan to threats of violence in the sinister city of Port Bin Qasim; from the lives of servants at home in Delhi to blackmail and menace within Rehans fathers company- this extraordinary family saga interrogates the nature of power in two changing countries. Aatish Taseer tells the story of a man who comes of age as his country does, in an atmosphere of political quicksand and moral danger.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.